U.S. Aid from Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority, Entire Region, 2010-2015

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Grant military and police aid from Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority, Entire Region, 2010-2015

Country2011201220132014Country Total
Honduras35,08235,08235,08235,082140,328
TOTAL35,08235,08235,08235,082140,328

All amounts in U.S. dollars. Numbers in italics are estimates, usually based on the closest year for which data are available.

All Grant Aid from Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority, Entire Region, 2010-2015

2011201220132014TOTAL
TOTAL035,08235,08235,08235,0820140,328

Military and police trainees from Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority, Entire Region, 2010-2015

Country2011Country Total
Honduras3030
TOTAL3030

Official Descriptions of Aid from Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority

U.S. Department of Defense, 2012

Document: Section 1209 and Section 1203(b) Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Years 2008, 2009, and 2010

Country: Western Hemisphere Regional

Section 1206 of the National Defense Authorization Act for FY2006 provides authority to build the capacity of foreign military forces. Specifically, it establishes the authority for the DoD, with the concurrence of the Secretary of State, to conduct or support programs to help build the capacity of a foreign country's national military forces in order for that country to conduct counterterrorism (CT) operations or participate in or support military and stability operations in which the U.S. armed forces are a participant. It also provides the authority to build the capacity of a foreign country’s maritime security forces to conduct counterterrorism operations.

Department of Defense, 2008

Document: Report to Congress on use of 1206 funds

Country: Suriname

Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname
CT Unit Train and Equip for OEF-CCA

The Department of Defense (DoD) plans to undertake activities pursuant to Section 1206 to build the capacity of national military forces in Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname to conduct counterterrorism operations. This Section 1206 program will help build, sustain and network partner counterterrorism force capabilities to detect, deter, disrupt and defeat violent extremist organizations (VEOs), supporting infrastructure and deny access to illicit transit mechanisms. The Department of State has verified that Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname are eligible to receive the type of assistance authorized by this legislation, and supports the use of Section 1206 authority.

This program will contain the required elements to promote the observance of and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and respect for legitimate civilian authority.

The cost associated with the human rights elements program is $1,673.00 and is being notified under a separate Congressional notification letter. The Defense Institute of International Legal Studies (DIILS) was tasked to take on a two-phased implementation approach for incorporating human rights elements and respect for civilian authority into Section 1206 programs. The first phase is a survey that will address the following topics: the identification of participants, facility location, and assistance in identifying and scheduling translators, meal logistics, and the time frame for the follow-on seminar.

DIILS has developed appropriate curriculum for the seminars, and will work with the U.S. Embassy in each 1206 recipient country to identify any additional specific human rights or international humanitarian law (law of war) topics that should be incorporated into the seminar. Relevant regional human rights international agreements will be incorporated as will specific legal topics identified by the country team, and/or the Partner Nation, as appropriate. The training audience will be unit commanders, key staff, and non-commissioned officers, as appropriate. Current human rights vetting (Leahy) is required for all participants on an individual basis.

This $13,799,502 program was coordinated through a joint DoD-Department of State review, approved by the Secretary of Defense, and concurred in by the Deputy Secretary of State. We intend to provide the following articles and services:

(Figures in parenthesis reflect estimated quantity. These figures may change based on the final price and availability of individual items.)

Suriname ($3,039,303)

• M4A1 Rifle (52) 5.56mm; and M9 Pistol 9mm (50); M24mm 7.62mm Rifle (2);

• Organization Clothing and Individual Equipment (OCIE);

• Vehicles 4x4 All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) (12); Ford F-350 Crew Cab Pickup Trucks (10);

• Contractor furnished operator, maintenance, and repair parts;

• Non-standard Communications Equipment spares parts, components, and accessories: UHF 4watt, 128 channels radio (30); 20watt HF Manpack Radio (6); 150watt Transit Case System (2).

• Basic Medical Equipment and Supplies

All items will be on-contract or ordered from stock no later than September 30, 2008. The period of performance for severable contracted services will not exceed 12 calendar months. It is estimated that deliveries in country will commence no earlier than May 1, 2009, and will be completed within 12 months.

Department of Defense, 2008

Document: Report to Congress on use of 1206 funds

Country: Honduras

Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname
CT Unit Train and Equip for OEF-CCA

The Department of Defense (DoD) plans to undertake activities pursuant to Section 1206 to build the capacity of national military forces in Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname to conduct counterterrorism operations. This Section 1206 program will help build, sustain and network partner counterterrorism force capabilities to detect, deter, disrupt and defeat violent extremist organizations (VEOs), supporting infrastructure and deny access to illicit transit mechanisms. The Department of State has verified that Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname are eligible to receive the type of assistance authorized by this legislation, and supports the use of Section 1206 authority.

This program will contain the required elements to promote the observance of and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and respect for legitimate civilian authority.

The cost associated with the human rights elements program is $1,673.00 and is being notified under a separate Congressional notification letter. The Defense Institute of International Legal Studies (DIILS) was tasked to take on a two-phased implementation approach for incorporating human rights elements and respect for civilian authority into Section 1206 programs. The first phase is a survey that will address the following topics: the identification of participants, facility location, and assistance in identifying and scheduling translators, meal logistics, and the time frame for the follow-on seminar.

DIILS has developed appropriate curriculum for the seminars, and will work with the U.S. Embassy in each 1206 recipient country to identify any additional specific human rights or international humanitarian law (law of war) topics that should be incorporated into the seminar. Relevant regional human rights international agreements will be incorporated as will specific legal topics identified by the country team, and/or the Partner Nation, as appropriate. The training audience will be unit commanders, key staff, and non-commissioned officers, as appropriate. Current human rights vetting (Leahy) is required for all participants on an individual basis.

This $13,799,502 program was coordinated through a joint DoD-Department of State review, approved by the Secretary of Defense, and concurred in by the Deputy Secretary of State. We intend to provide the following articles and services:

(Figures in parenthesis reflect estimated quantity. These figures may change based on the final price and availability of individual items.)

Honduras ($5,305,343)

• M4A1 Rifle (112) 5.56mm; and M9 Pistol 9mm (100); M24mm 7.62mm Rifle (12);

• Organization Clothing and Individual Equipment (OCIE);

• Vehicles 4x4 All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) (12); Ford F-350 Crew Cab Pickup Trucks (25);

• Contractor furnished operator, maintenance, and repair parts;

• Non-standard Communications Equipment spares parts, components, and accessories: UHF 4watt, 128 channels radio (75); 20watt HF Manpack Radio (12); 150watt Transit Case System (6).

• Basic Medical Equipment and Supplies

All items will be on-contract or ordered from stock no later than September 30, 2008. The period of performance for severable contracted services will not exceed 12 calendar months. It is estimated that deliveries in country will commence no earlier than May 1, 2009, and will be completed within 12 months.

Department of Defense, 2008

Document: Report to Congress on use of 1206 funds

Country: Guyana

Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname
CT Unit Train and Equip for OEF-CCA

The Department of Defense (DoD) plans to undertake activities pursuant to Section 1206 to build the capacity of national military forces in Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname to conduct counterterrorism operations. This Section 1206 program will help build, sustain and network partner counterterrorism force capabilities to detect, deter, disrupt and defeat violent extremist organizations (VEOs), supporting infrastructure and deny access to illicit transit mechanisms. The Department of State has verified that Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname are eligible to receive the type of assistance authorized by this legislation, and supports the use of Section 1206 authority.

This program will contain the required elements to promote the observance of and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and respect for legitimate civilian authority.

The cost associated with the human rights elements program is $1,673.00 and is being notified under a separate Congressional notification letter. The Defense Institute of International Legal Studies (DIILS) was tasked to take on a two-phased implementation approach for incorporating human rights elements and respect for civilian authority into Section 1206 programs. The first phase is a survey that will address the following topics: the identification of participants, facility location, and assistance in identifying and scheduling translators, meal logistics, and the time frame for the follow-on seminar.

DIILS has developed appropriate curriculum for the seminars, and will work with the U.S. Embassy in each 1206 recipient country to identify any additional specific human rights or international humanitarian law (law of war) topics that should be incorporated into the seminar. Relevant regional human rights international agreements will be incorporated as will specific legal topics identified by the country team, and/or the Partner Nation, as appropriate. The training audience will be unit commanders, key staff, and non-commissioned officers, as appropriate. Current human rights vetting (Leahy) is required for all participants on an individual basis.

This $13,799,502 program was coordinated through a joint DoD-Department of State review, approved by the Secretary of Defense, and concurred in by the Deputy Secretary of State. We intend to provide the following articles and services:

(Figures in parenthesis reflect estimated quantity. These figures may change based on the final price and availability of individual items.)

Guyana ($2,686,665)

• Organization Clothing and Individual Equipment (OCIE);

• Vehicles 4x4 All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) (12); Ford F-350 Crew Cab Pickup Trucks (10);

• Contractor furnished operator, maintenance, and repair parts;

• Non-standard Communications Equipment spares parts, components, and accessories: UHF 4watt, 128 channels radio (40); 20watt HF Manpack Radio (6); 150watt Transit Case System (2).

• Basic Medical Equipment and Supplies

All items will be on-contract or ordered from stock no later than September 30, 2008. The period of performance for severable contracted services will not exceed 12 calendar months. It is estimated that deliveries in country will commence no earlier than May 1, 2009, and will be completed within 12 months.

Department of Defense, 2008

Document: Report to Congress on use of 1206 funds

Country: Belize

Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname
CT Unit Train and Equip for OEF-CCA

The Department of Defense (DoD) plans to undertake activities pursuant to Section 1206 to build the capacity of national military forces in Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname to conduct counterterrorism operations. This Section 1206 program will help build, sustain and network partner counterterrorism force capabilities to detect, deter, disrupt and defeat violent extremist organizations (VEOs), supporting infrastructure and deny access to illicit transit mechanisms. The Department of State has verified that Belize, Honduras, Guyana, Suriname are eligible to receive the type of assistance authorized by this legislation, and supports the use of Section 1206 authority.

This program will contain the required elements to promote the observance of and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and respect for legitimate civilian authority.

The cost associated with the human rights elements program is $1,673.00 and is being notified under a separate Congressional notification letter. The Defense Institute of International Legal Studies (DIILS) was tasked to take on a two-phased implementation approach for incorporating human rights elements and respect for civilian authority into Section 1206 programs. The first phase is a survey that will address the following topics: the identification of participants, facility location, and assistance in identifying and scheduling translators, meal logistics, and the time frame for the follow-on seminar.

DIILS has developed appropriate curriculum for the seminars, and will work with the U.S. Embassy in each 1206 recipient country to identify any additional specific human rights or international humanitarian law (law of war) topics that should be incorporated into the seminar. Relevant regional human rights international agreements will be incorporated as will specific legal topics identified by the country team, and/or the Partner Nation, as appropriate. The training audience will be unit commanders, key staff, and non-commissioned officers, as appropriate. Current human rights vetting (Leahy) is required for all participants on an individual basis.

This $13,799,502 program was coordinated through a joint DoD-Department of State review, approved by the Secretary of Defense, and concurred in by the Deputy Secretary of State. We intend to provide the following articles and services:

(Figures in parenthesis reflect estimated quantity. These figures may change based on the final price and availability of individual items.)

Belize ($2,768,191)

• M4A1 Rifle (24) 5.56mm; and M9 Pistol 9mm (50); M24mm 7.62mm Rifle (4);

• Organization Clothing and Individual Equipment (OCIE);

• Vehicles 4x4 All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) (12); Ford F-350 Crew Cab Pickup Trucks (10);

• Contractor furnished operator, maintenance, and repair parts;

• Non-standard Communications Equipment spares parts, components, and accessories: UHF 4watt, 128 channels radio (30); 20watt HF Manpack Radio (6); 150watt Transit Case System (2).

• Basic Medical Equipment and Supplies

All items will be on-contract or ordered from stock no later than September 30, 2008. The period of performance for severable contracted services will not exceed 12 calendar months. It is estimated that deliveries in country will commence no earlier than May 1, 2009, and will be completed within 12 months.

Department of Defense, 2008

Document: Report to Congress on use of 1206 funds

Country: Mexico

MEXICO
COUNTERTERRORISM CAPABILITIES PACKAGE

The Department of Defense (DoD) plans to undertake activities pursuant to Section 1206 to build the capacity of national military forces in Mexico to conduct counterterrorism operations. This program will enhance Mexico’s Army and Navy/Naval Infantry (Special Forces) ability to reduce ungoverned territory that could be exploited by violent extremist organizations, more effectively protect critical infrastructure, find and fix suspected targets, and establish the conditions for increased cooperation with the U.S.

The Department of State has verified that Mexico is eligible to receive the type of assistance authorized by this legislation, and supports the use of Section 1206 authority. This program will contain the required elements to promote the observance of and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and respect for legitimate civilian authority.

The cost associated with the human rights elements program is $1,673.00 and is being notified under a separate Congressional notification letter. The Defense Institute of International Legal Studies (DIILS) was tasked to take on a two-phased implementation approach for incorporating human rights elements and respect for civilian authority into Section 1206 programs. The first phase is a survey that will address the following topics: the identification of participants, facility location, and assistance in identifying and scheduling translators, meal logistics, and the time frame for the follow-on seminar.

DIILS has developed appropriate curriculum for the seminars, and will work with the U.S. Embassy in each 1206 recipient country to identify any additional specific human rights or international humanitarian law (law of war) topics that should be incorporated into the seminar. Relevant regional human rights international agreements will be incorporated as will specific legal topics identified by the country team, and/or the Partner Nation, as appropriate. The training audience will be unit commanders, key staff, and non-commissioned officers, as appropriate. Current human rights vetting (Leahy) is required for all participants on an individual basis.

This $12,945,854 program was coordinated through a joint DoD-Department of State review, approved by the Secretary of Defense, and concurred in by the Deputy Secretary of State. We intend to provide the following articles and services:

(Figure in parenthesis reflects planned quantity – final quantity of some items may vary slightly based upon actual cost.)

• Technical Support Services for initial, intermediate, and advanced Digital Media Forensics (three-phase Digital Media Forensics Capability).

• Non-Standard Communications Equipment and Services - Tactical/Non-Tactical Harris Radios (61); Harris Multiband Handheld Radio System (40); GPS Receiver- Ground 760 (10); GPS Receiver- Ground Garmin (15); GPS Receiver – Garmin [In-Country]; Harris Radios Maintenance Training [In-Country].

• Night Vision Devices (115); NVD Aviator Vision System: (24); NVD Weapon Sight System: (20); Weapon Spare Parts, Components, and Accessories.

• Air Operations Equipment - Parachutes + Aerial Del Equipment: General supplies, Miscellaneous Items;

• Counterterrorism Equipment; Ammunition 5.56mm; Safety + Rescue Clothing, Textiles, and Individual Equipment (Army/Navy); Weapon Spare Parts, Components & Accessories (Mexican Army CT Material);

• 11 Meter Rigid Inflatable Boats (8); Ship parts, components, accessories, support equipment, diesel engines, and diagnostic equipment; contactor engineering technical services.

All items will be on-contract or ordered from stock no later than September 30, 2008. The period of performance for severable contracted services will not exceed 12 calendar months. It is estimated that deliveries in country will begin no earlier than May 1, 2009, with equipment delivery to be completed within a 24-month period.

U.S. Department of Defense

Document: Fiscal Year 2009 Budget Request: Summary Justification

Country: Western Hemisphere Regional

Global Train and Equip Authority (FY 2006 NDAA Section 1206) to build partner nation security capacity ($0.5 billion);

Global Train and Equip programs allow Combatant Commanders and Ambassadors, working together, to train and equip foreign military forces in response to urgent and emergent threats and opportunities, solving problems before they become crises that require significant military interventions. The geographic Combatant Commanders consider global train and equip authority the Department’s single most important tool for building partner operational capacity, shaping the environment, and countering terrorism outside Iraq and Afghanistan. The annual demand from Combatant Commanders and Ambassadors for train and equip funds has significantly exceeded current authority. In fact, over the past two years, Combatant Commanders have submitted more than $1.6 billion of proposals. While the Global Train and Equip authority has been in effect less than three years, it has rapidly become the gold standard for interagency cooperation to meet emerging threats and opportunities because of the revolutionary way it is managed. Beneficial program characteristics include:

• Speed and Prevention. Traditional security assistance takes three to four years from concept to execution. Global Train and Equip authority allows a response to urgent and emergent threats or opportunities in six months or less.

• Rigor. Thorough vetting of submissions results in strategically sound choices with a high national security return on investment. Proposals for Global Train and Equip funds are scored by SOCOM, the Joint Staff, Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, and separately by numerous Department of State components, with independent review by regional, functional, and programmatic experts. Both Departments of Defense and State must agree explicitly before any program can go forward. Planning requirements also far exceed those for comparable programs. Combatant Commands and Embassies must lay out detailed proposals that are assessed on the full range of issues that impact program success, including operations and maintenance plans, absorptive capacity and executability, adherence to broad foreign policy objectives, military feasibility, integration with other USG efforts, and mitigation of human rights concerns. Leveraging the range of core competencies resident in U.S. Departments and Agencies results in the selection of proposals the need for which is strategically clear.

• Targeted National Security Investments. Under traditional security assistance programs, most countries get roughly equivalent levels of assistance year after year, independent of new needs or changes in the strategic environment. Moreover, recipient countries have significant say in what they purchase with the money. With Global Train and Equip programs, countries must compete for funds yearly for projects that support shared security goals. There is no “fair share” each year, nor entitlement that any Embassy or Command will receive funding from one year to the next. Also, each proposal is generated by an Ambassador or Combatant Commander, ensuring that the projects meets a U.S. requirement, rather than partner-nation wish list.

• Dual-Key Authority. DoD and Department of State coordinate on all security cooperation activities, but the Global Train and Equip authority takes cooperation to a new level. It encourages joint formulation of programs between embassies and Combatant Commands, and both must approve each program explicitly in writing. This brings the best competencies of both departments to bear, including the diplomacy that is required to achieve buy-in from foreign partners. embassies and Combatant Commands, and both must approve each program explicitly in writing. This brings the best competencies of both departments to bear, including the diplomacy that is required to achieve buy-in from foreign partners.

The Department will continue to build on the success of this program in several ways. Metrics are under development to measure operational and strategic effects. DoD has asked the Inspector General to do a three-year systemic review of Global Train and Equip programs and to make its own recommendations to improve program performance. When operations tempo allows, the Department will use U.S. forces to conduct and supervise training in order to improve the quality of training and build military-to-military relationships. Finally, the Department will integrate partners into combined exercise programs to periodically test their capabilities and assess how well they are maintained or improved over time.

U.S. Department of Defense, 2009

Document: Fiscal Year 2009 Budget Request: Summary Justification

Country: Western Hemisphere Regional

Global Train and Equip ($0.5 billion): Global Train and Equip programs allow Combatant Commanders and Ambassadors to train and equip foreign military forces to respond to urgent and emergent threats and opportunities to solve problems before they become crises requiring military intervention. Combatant Commanders consider this the single most important tool for the Department to shape the environment and counter terrorism outside Iraq and Afghanistan.

U.S. Southern Command

Document: March 6, 2007 Hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee

Country: Western Hemisphere Regional

Admiral Stavridis, commander, U.S. Southern Command: 1206- type monies are how we equip partner nations to go after things like these self-propelled, semi-submersibles. We have used them to provide our partners with high-speed boats, command and control, the ability to control the area around them. So all of those programs are excellent and critical in every way.

U.S. Southern Command, 2008

Document: Posture Statement

Country: Western Hemisphere Regional

Operation Enduring Freedom-Caribbean and Central America (OEF-CCA). This year, U.S. Southern Command began OEF-CCA as a key initiative to address potential terrorist threats in the region. Within a cooperative regional environment, OEF-CCA seeks to improve the capabilities of Caribbean and Central American partners to interdict and disrupt terrorists who might leverage illicit transnational routes and uncontrolled areas to threaten the United States and/or our neighbors. OEF- CCA is a long-term endeavor and will create a multi-layered counter-terrorism posture of mutual benefit to the United States and regional partners.

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Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority:

Program Description

Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority:

Law

Grant Aid Table Sources:

  • Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority Honduras 2011; Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority Honduras 2012; Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority Honduras 2013; Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority Honduras 2014; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2012 (Washington: December 2012) (Link to source).

Economic Aid Table Sources:

  • Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority ; -

Trainees Table Sources:

  • Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority Honduras 2011; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2012 (Washington: December 2012) (Link to source).

Sales Table Sources:

  • Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority ; -

Deployments Table Sources:

  • Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority ; -