U.S. Aid from International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, Entire Region, 2006-2011

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Grant military and police aid from International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, Entire Region, 2006-2011

Country200620072008200920102011Country Total
Colombia350,248,000386,869,000223,124,500228,089,000194,750,000175,250,0001,558,330,500
Mexico28,340,00036,678,000292,298,000343,500,000146,000,00030,000,000876,816,000
Haiti13,925,00014,850,00010,727,00016,750,000158,769,60019,120,000234,141,600
Peru47,700,00056,000,00031,296,00031,414,00034,500,00029,400,000230,310,000
Central America Regional2,225,00051,825,00051,618,00064,248,000169,916,000
Western Hemisphere Regional1,900,0002,200,00018,148,0003,600,00068,088,00063,052,000156,988,000
Bolivia37,206,00035,000,00025,423,00021,884,00015,800,00015,000,000150,313,000
Ecuador7,315,0008,900,0006,112,0006,129,0003,250,0004,300,00036,006,000
Caribbean Regional8,157,00024,550,00032,707,000
Guatemala1,060,00013,000,0002,472,0001,500,0008,300,00026,332,000
Brazil4,940,0004,000,000285,000300,000200,0001,000,00010,725,000
Panama3,125,0004,000,000592,0007,717,000
Dominican Republic2,992,0002,992,000
Jamaica530,000900,000342,0001,772,000
Honduras650,000608,0001,258,000
Paraguay272,000215,000355,000300,0001,142,000
Venezuela1,000,0001,000,000
Bahamas120,000500,000100,000720,000
Argentina194,000275,000230,000699,000
Costa Rica500,000500,000
El Salvador478,000478,000
Trinidad and Tobago227,000227,000
Eastern Caribbean200,000200,000
Chile80,00080,000
TOTAL496,409,000566,772,000615,970,500703,981,000683,717,600434,520,0003,501,370,100

All amounts in U.S. dollars.

All Grant Aid from International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, Entire Region, 2006-2011

200620072008200920102011TOTAL
TOTAL496,409,000566,772,000615,970,500703,981,000683,717,600434,520,0003,501,370,100

Military and police trainees from International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, Entire Region, 2006-2011

Country200620072008200920102011Country Total
Mexico132244,933279925,460
Colombia5553815916678107153,719
Peru4356821017681439
Ecuador9853330166
Panama92698
Antigua and Barbuda1212
Bolivia617
Dominica44
St. Vincent and the Grenadines44
St. Lucia44
Haiti123
St. Kitts and Nevis33
Dominican Republic112
TOTAL9474787075,7321,1678909,921

U.S. Training Institutions, International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, Entire Region, 2006-2011 (Maximum 20 Shown)

Institution20062007200820092010Total
Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation1302111552304351,161
Inter-American Air Forces Academy1986797129225716
Narcotics Affairs Section4,834234391
Army Aviation Logistics School212359109169381
Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School (NAVSCIATTS)11145674144299
Army Aviation Center377283348153
12th Flying Training Wing7272
Headquarters U.S. Army Garrison363066
Narcotics Affairs Section/Customs and Border Protection5050
Security Assistance Training Management OFC4141
Coast Guard Training Center27330
XVIII Airborne Corps2828
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives/Narcotics Affairs Section61016
Defense Language Institute English Language Center1146
ENGINEER SCHOOL33
Coast Guard International Training Center22
OIC, CENTER FOR SEABEES AND FACILITIES ENGINEERING DET22
Inter-American Defense College22
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SAFETY INSTITUTE11
Army Medical Department Center and School11
TOTAL4973224248631,3163,422

Official Descriptions of Aid from International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 2012

Document: Keynote Address to Central America Border Management Seminar in Panama

Country: El Salvador

DHS PRESENCE IN COUNTRY
• 8 Total: 5 Federal; 3 Foreign Service National (FSN)/Locally Employed Staff (LES) • 3 ICE – 3 Federal
• 5 USCIS – 2 Federal, 3 FSN/LES
DHS PROGRAMS/ACTIVITIES IN COUNTRY
• ICEo
o
o
Transnational Criminal Investigative Unit (TCIU)
 Comprised of foreign law enforcement personnel, TCIUs facilitate
information exchange, rapid bilateral investigation, and ultimately enhance the host country’s ability to investigate and prosecute individuals involved in weapons trafficking and counter proliferation; money laundering and bulk cash smuggling; human smuggling and trafficking; narcotics trafficking; intellectual property rights violations and other customs fraud; child exploitation; cybercrime; and other violations within the ICE investigative purview.
Biometric Identification Transnational Migration Alert Program (BITMAP)  Partner nation authorities in Central America, including immigration
services and border police, collect biometrics in cooperation with HSI’s TCIUs and through HSI’s Biometric Identification Transnational Migration Alert Program (BITMAP). The host country owns the biometric data and shares the information with HSI for intelligence and screening.
Enforcement and Removal Operations
 ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) maintains a good
working relationship with the Government of El Salvador. ICE ERO is currently experiencing a substantial reduction in travel document issuance rates and an increase in travel document issuance times at multiple Salvadoran consulates across the nation. ERO field offices have reported that consular officials are delaying travel document issuance, coinciding with the publication of ICE’s prosecutorial discretion guidelines on June 17, 2011. (See Also: Homeland Security-Specific Issues)
 Removal charters into El Salvador occur up to five times per week, with no more than 120 aliens per flight. ICE Air Operations activities in El Salvador are dealt with directly through ICE San Salvador.
Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT)
 C-TPAT conducted two site validations in El Salvador in 2011.
 C-TPAT has two site validations that are expected to take place in 2012.
Trade-Related Support
 Textile Production Verification Team (TPVT) visits are conducted by
CBP Import specialists, Textile Specialists, Textile/Apparel Policy and Programs personnel, and regulatory auditors to verify factory production capability and compliance of shipments imported into the United States with claims of duty-free treatment based on the CAFTA-DR. The next TPVT visit is scheduled for February 2012.
 Pathways to Prosperity Customs/Border Management Project: CBP is supporting a Department of Commerce project to provide seminars to public and private sector entities on customs practices, especially related to the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). A workshop is tentatively scheduled for June 2012 in San
Salvador
Border Security Advisor
 CARSI-funded Advisor (February-August 2012) to support CBP initiatives and work with Embassy Law Enforcement Working Group to determine areas for CBP capacity building.
Joint Security Program
 CBP will send officers to both the Guatemala City International Airport
and San Salvador International Airport for ninety days starting in mid- February to work with Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) as part of a jump team focusing on the illicit travel of Special Interest Aliens.
Aviation Information Sharing
 CBP and DHS/OIA are working with the Embassy of El Salvador in
Washington, D.C. and the U.S. Embassy in El Salvador to review the proposed Aviation Information Sharing Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which is the first step towards creating an APIS program in El Salvador. The MOU allows for the sharing of API between the U.S. and El Salvador and is expected to be signed at the end of February 2012.
Counterfeit Case Investigation
 USSS is working with the Elite Division against Organized Crime
(DECCO) and El Salvador National Police regarding counterfeit cases.
San Salvador Field Office
 The USCIS San Salvador Field Office workload includes Immigration
Services, Fraud Detection and Deterrence, Inter and Intra-Government Liaison, and Boarding Letters for Legal Permanent Residents.
Counterdrug Operations
 USCG is supporting SOUTHCOM's Operation MARTILLO, a
counterdrug OPLAN designed to deny traffickers the use of littorals and push them farther offshore. Pushing drug trafficking routes farther offshore will feed the drug interdiction continuum’s “Cycle of Success.” Once routes are pushed onto international waters where the USG can establish clear jurisdiction, the seizures can be prosecuted in the U.S. Seizures produce new intelligence and advanced investigations. This leads to more actionable intelligence on future events, producing follow- on seizures and thus feeding a cycle of success.
Security Assessments and Air Carrier Inspections
 TSA has an informal Federal Air Marshal (FAM) mission agreement with
El Salvador. TSA is currently negotiating both a FAM MOA and a
technical assistance MOA with El Salvador.
 TSA assesses security and conducts air carrier inspections at Comalapa
International Airport (SAL) in San Salvador. Currently, there are five airlines operating Last Point of Departure service to the United States from SAL. TSA assessed SAL August 11-19, 2010, and conducted an air carrier inspection August 15-19, 2011. The next scheduled air carrier inspection is July 8-14, 2012.
• DHS-wide
o International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) San Salvador
 CBP: Border security
 ICE: Anti-Human Trafficking
 USSS: Cybercrimes, VIP Protection, Genuine/Counterfeit US currency
features

...

Border Security
In 2010 and 2011, CBP conducted border security assessments of El Salvador’s land ports, seaports, and airports as well as the green border. Based on these assessments, CBP provides training and technical assistance to Salvadoran customs, immigration, military, and police in targeting and interdiction best practices in each border environment. A CBP officer was deployed in January 2011 to serve as a Border Security Advisor, supporting CBP’s training schedule as well as providing subject matter expertise to the U.S. Embassy and the Government of El Salvador in customs and border security-related issues.

Airport and Aviation Security
ICE Assistant Attaché San Salvador and CBP, working with Post, has provided direction and funding to remodel and bring the passenger processing areas at Comalapa International Airport up to U.S. airport standards. Construction begins in late March 2012.
TSA has an informal Federal Air Marshal (FAM) mission agreement with El Salvador. In response to the Civil Aviation Authority of El Salvador’s request for an overarching bilateral Memorandum of Agreement (MOA), TSA and the Civil Aviation Authority are currently negotiating a bilateral MOA for technical assistance as well as a FAM MOA. The Organization of American States provided Excellence in Screening Techniques training to El Salvador in September 2011 using TSA instructors.
CBP is engaged with the Government of El Salvador in the context of a proposed regional targeting center, located in and hosted by the Government of Panama. El Salvador is currently collecting inbound and outbound Advance Passenger Information (API) from carriers via a web- based platform. The government may have some advance passenger data collection gaps, such as private aircraft. There are some preliminary hardware needs already identified, essentially their new hand-held passport readers have overloaded their servers, so they would need some foreign assistance.
In August 2011, CBP traveled to El Salvador for meetings on APIS capacity and the Regional Targeting Center proposal. The CBP team met with the Chief of Airport Immigration Operations, and representatives of Customs and the National Police. CBP toured the passenger arrival operations and received a demonstration of El Salvador’s web-based APIS system, a solution that screens data acquired from ARINC. The El Salvadoran APIS system is robust, including inbound and outbound modules and an integrated display of air and land border crossings. Immigration has a small Passenger Analysis Unit that reviews, vets, and clears false matches prior to arrival in the same way that CBP officers review matches in the Automated Targeting System.
Maritime Security
El Salvador is the only Central American country with which the USCG does not have a maritime counterdrug bilateral agreement or SOP. Because of El Salvador’s excessive territorial sea claim with Honduras, the United States is not able to enter into a binding bilateral agreement, but could potentially negotiate an SOP to facilitate confirmation of registry and authorization to stop, board, and search El Salvadoran flagged vessels, similar to the SOP with Ecuador.
Since FY 2005, the Coast Guard has provided a total of 37 resident courses and 12 mobile training teams in the areas of maritime law enforcement, crisis command and control, engineering, professional development, port security, and anti-terrorism. Projected training in FY 2011 includes seven resident training courses in professional development and engineering.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 2012

Document: Keynote Address to Central America Border Management Seminar in Panama

Country: Costa Rica

DHS Engagement with Costa Rica
The United States and Costa Rica share a strong bilateral relationship built on bolstering security, strengthening democracy, and promoting trade. The two Nations have worked together through CARSI as well as regional bodies like SICA. DHS has only one permanent position in Costa Rica; a USCG Security Assistance Officer/Maritime Liaison Officer, funded by the Department of Defense, serves as the Senior Defense Official to the Ambassador. In addition, a CARSI-funded CBP Advisor arrived in Costa Rica in February for a six-month detail to support CBP initiatives and work with the Embassy Law Enforcement Working Group to determine areas for CBP capacity building efforts. A second six-month CARSI-funded advisor will deploy to Costa Rica in April to work specifically with the Ministry of Security on establishing a border police unit. This is similar to the support CBP has been providing in Honduras over the last two years.

...

Maritime Security
The USCG provides training and education through resident schools and operational units in the United States and by Mobile Education and Training Teams in host countries. The USCG provided three mobile training teams in engineering, small boat operations, and maritime law enforcement to Costa Rica in FY11. As directed by the Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA), the USCG’s International Port Security (IPS) Program visits foreign countries to assess and periodically re-assess the effectiveness of anti-terrorism measures in the ports of the nations conducting maritime trade with the United States, including Costa Rica. USCG’s last IPS visit to Costa Rica occurred in August 2010. The next visit is scheduled for May 2012.
The USCG and CBP Air and Marine provide personnel and assets to the Joint Interagency Task Force-South to increase surveillance and intelligence, conduct interdiction operations in international waters and littoral regions in Central America. The USCG is also supporting SOUTHCOM's Operation MARTILLO, a counterdrug OPLAN designed to deny traffickers the use of littorals and push them farther offshore.
The USCG-sponsored Multilateral Maritime Counter Drug Summit will be held in San Jose, Costa Rica in March 2012. USCG is planning/coordinating the event with its host, the Costa Rican Coast Guard. This regional interoperability professional exchange facilitates closer collaboration and integration among partner Nations and finds solutions to issues that impede effective implementation of existing bilateral agreements and arrangements.
USCG and DEA are working with senior Costa Rican officials to improve prosecution results in Costa Rica by tailoring USCG evidence packages on maritime drug smuggling cases to better meet their legal standards.
Border Security
CBP is working with the Costa Rican National Police to develop operational plans for their new border police unit. CBP and the Ministry of Public Security are currently negotiating an agreement to formalize Border Patrol support and to link all plans to the Central America Regional Border Protection Training Program being developed in Panama. Through the CARSI- funded Advisor, CBP is working with the U.S. Embassy and the GOCR to identify capacity building areas at and between the official ports of entry.
ICE Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) works closely with the GOCR with Program Global Shield, a U.S.-led, multilateral operation targeting and combating the illicit trafficking of precursor chemicals used by terrorist and other criminal organizations to manufacture improvised explosive devices. Monthly reporting has not been consistent enough to garner a full intelligence picture of the problem in Central America. Costa Rica uploads monthly reports inconsistently.
ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations maintains a good working relationship with the GOCR. Returns (440 in FY2011) are conducted via commercial and charter flights with valid passports and/or travel documents being issued by embassies in Washington, D.C. and various consulates within the United States. HSI is working to augment its personnel in Panama to address transnational crime in Costa Rica.

...

IF ASKED:
• Are DHS efforts in the drug transit zone affected when GOCR does not authorize U.S. Navy port calls in Costa Rica?
 Note: Per U.S. Ambassador Andrews, the Department of State recommends avoiding this
topic with the GOCR as it is extremely sensitive. Ambassador Andrews will brief you on
the current situation when you arrive in San Jose.
 Yes. The GOCR requires USG to submit requests for port visits in six-month blocks for
approval by their Congress. These port calls are strategically planned for a vessel’s deployment to limit the amount of transit time between United States, the operating area and the logistical stop. Consequently, SOUTHCOM is forced to list all potential ships that might need to make a port call in Costa Rica on this semi-annual request. The GOCR routinely grants permission for USCG vessels to enter Costa Rican ports for fuel and supplies, but has recently denied the U.S. Navy requests for domestic political reasons. The ability of U.S. assets to refuel and resupply in Costa Rica, including U.S. Navy ships, facilitates increased on station time and mission effectiveness for law enforcement assets.
• What is the current status of the Export Pilot Program between United States and Costa Rica?  Costa Rica’s AEO program “PROFAC” (Programa de Facilitación Aduanera para el
Comercio Confiable en Costa Rica) was launched in 2010 and is gathering strength as C-TPAT continues to provide technical assistance to solidify their program. C-TPAT has already identified their key private-sector partners to participate in the export pilot program. PROFAC is currently in the process of identifying and selecting their partners, once they make the selection C-TPAT will grant benefits to exporters based on completion of PROFAC’s requirements.
• What is the current status of the support for the border police unit?
 CBP/Border Patrol Tactical Unit (BORTAC) officials are drafting and exchanging
documents with the Ministry of Security to develop position descriptions for the border police officers in order to have a cadre hired in time for the first training session (tentatively July 2012). A BORTAC agent will arrive in San Jose in Spring 2012 to serve as an advisor to work solely on getting the program started.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 2012

Document: Keynote Address to Central America Border Management Seminar in Panama

Country: Costa Rica

DHS PRESENCE IN COUNTRY
• 1 Total; 1 Federal • 1 USCG: 1 Federal
DHS PROGRAMS/ACTIVITIES IN COUNTRY
• CBPoRegionalAviationInformationSharing/RegionalTargetingCenterinPanama  CBP representatives traveled to Costa Rica in February 2011 to observe
the Government of Costa Rica’s current Advance Passenger Information functionality. A draft information sharing Memorandum of Understanding was subsequently transmitted by U.S. Embassy San Jose for review by GCR in January 2012.
o Trusted Shipper Pilot Program
 CBP is currently working with Costa Rican Customs to implement an
export pilot program. The goal of the program is to help solidify Costa Rica’s new Authorized Economic Operator program and for C-TPAT to afford some of its key Tier III importers an additional benefit when their
FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
cargo arrives in Costa Rican soil: expedited clearance by Costa Rican law
enforcement.
o Border Police Development Technical Assistance
 CBP is developing a large scale capacity building program with the Costa Rican Border Police including developing organizational structure with Ministerial-level staff. This is in conjunction with the development of a Central American regional border security training program centered in Panama that will involve all Central American nations.
o BorderSecurityAdvisor
 CARSI-funded Advisor (February-August 2012) to support CBP
initiatives and work with Embassy Law Enforcement Working Group to
determine areas for CBP capacity building. o Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism
 C-TPAT conducted 7 site validations throughout Costa Rica in 2011.
 C-TPAT has 4 site validations that are expected to take place in 2012. • USCG
o Maritime Training
 The USCG provides personnel and assets to the Joint Interagency Task
Force-South to increase surveillance and intelligence, conduct interdiction operations in international waters in the Caribbean and Pacific arenas, and to provide Central American governments training in a wide range of maritime security, law enforcement, and safety areas.
o CounterdrugOperations
 The USCG is supporting SOUTHCOM's Operation MARTILLO, a
counterdrug OPLAN designed to deny traffickers the use of littorals and push them farther offshore. Pushing drug trafficking routes farther offshore will feed the drug interdiction continuum’s “Cycle of Success.” Once routes are pushed onto international waters where the USG can establish clear jurisdiction, the seizures can be prosecuted in the U.S. Seizures produce new intelligence and advanced investigations. This leads to more actionable intelligence on future events, producing follow- on seizures and thus feeding a cycle of success.
• USSS
o U.S. Currency Features Training
 The USSS provides training to private organizations (banks, casinos, etc.) regarding security features of US currency and is working with the Costa Rica National Police regarding counterfeit US currency investigations.
• TSAoSecurityAssessmentsandAirCarrierInspections
 TSA is currently negotiating a technical assistance Memorandum of
Agreement with Costa Rica. In addition, TSA signed a multilateral agreement with the Latin American Civil Aviation Commission (LACAC) and is negotiating a technical assistance agreement with the Central American Corporation for Air Navigation Services (Corporación Centroamericana de Servicios de Navegación Aérea, or COCESNA). Costa Rica is a member of LACAC.
FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
 TSA assesses security and conducts air carrier inspections at Daniel Oduber Quiras International Airport (LIR) in Liberia, and Juan Santa Maria International Airport (SJO) in San Jose. Currently, there are nine airlines operating Last Point of Departure service to the United States from LIR and SJO. SJO has an airport assessment and an air carrier inspection planned for May 1-8, 2012, and an air carrier inspection was conducted April 11-19, 2011. LIR has an airport assessment and an air carrier inspection planned for June 18-25, 2012, and a security site visit was conducted September 6-9, 2011
• ICEo Program Global Shield
 ICE Homeland Security Investigations works closely with the
Governments of Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Panama with Program Global Shield (PGS), a U.S.-led, multilateral operation targeting and combating the illicit trafficking of precursor chemicals used by terrorist and other criminal organizations to manufacture improvised explosive devices. Monthly reporting has not been consistent enough to garner a full intelligence picture of the problem in Central America. Costa Rica has uploaded monthly reports inconsistently.
o Enforcement and Removal Operations
 ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations maintains a good working
relationship with the Government of Costa Rica. Returns are conducted via commercial and charter flights with valid passports and/or travel documents being issued by embassies in Washington, D.C. and various consulates within the United States. ICE Air Operations for Costa Rica are handled through ICE El Salvador.

U.S. Department of State, 2012

Document: International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2012 Program and Budget Guide

Country: Caribbean Regional

Program Overview

The Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI) addresses the increasing crime and violence, largely driven by drug and other illicit trafficking, that affects the safety of both United States and Caribbean citizens. As the Merida Initiative and Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI) apply pressure against trafficking organizations in Mexico and Central America, CBSI funding will support complementary efforts to address the potential spillover effect from traffickers shifting routes to the Caribbean.

Programs under this initiative may strengthen Caribbean partner nation capabilities in the areas of maritime security, law enforcement, information sharing, border and migration control, transnational crime, and criminal justice.

Programs will build upon previously successful partnerships and develop partner nation capabilities to allow them to cooperate and coordinate in a regional context to address citizen safety concerns.

Program Goals and Objectives

CBSI supports the Caribbean Community's (CARICOM) “Organized Crime Strategy.” The program also supports FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plans from our Caribbean posts and INL's FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR), Counternarcotics, and Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: Substantially reduce illicit trafficking.

Objective 2: Advance public safety and security.

Objective 3: Promote Social Justice.

FY 2012 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

- Funds may support law enforcement operations reform in the region to establish and sustain professional and accountable law enforcement services. Funds may be used to establish, train, and equip vetted police units that can work on a wide range of issues from drug and arms trafficking to extradition operations. Programs may support increased information sharing among governments in the Caribbean Basin; support programs for increased proficiency of corrections personnel; and support the sustainability and expansion of law enforcement end-game capabilities, as well as border and port security.

Counternarcotics

- Funds may combat the cultivation, production, and trafficking of drugs throughout the Caribbean Basin. Support may include training, equipment, and maintenance to enhance law enforcement officials' ability to eradicate and interdict illicit drugs. Funds may also establish sustainable institutional change in support of host nation law enforcement capacity, enhance cooperation in securing borders, and provide alternatives to criminal activities through support of rehabilitation efforts.

Transnational Crime

- Funds may seek to minimize the adverse effects of criminal activities in the Caribbean Basin. Efforts may support training of law enforcement personnel, including anti-gang training, and training on money laundering, financial crimes, and asset forfeiture for the region.

Rule of Law and Human Rights

- USG assistance may seek to advance rule of law activities in the Caribbean Basin. Efforts may include improving courts administration, management, and processes; building capacity of prosecutors and improving collaboration between civilian prosecutors and judicial or police investigators; and improving forensic skills for use in the judicial system.

U.S. Department of State, 2012

Document: International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2012 Program and Budget Guide

Country: Central America Regional

Program Overview

Approximately 95 percent of Andean cocaine transits Mexico and Central America on its way to the United States. With increasing pressure on drug traffickers in Mexico, Colombia, and in international waters, the region is challenged by declining public security as traffickers increasingly shift to Central American territorial waters and land routes as primary transshipment points. Central American officials have identified gangs, drug trafficking, trafficking of arms, and organized crime as the most pressing security concerns in the region. Vulnerabilities created by the increasingly violent nature of the security situation in Central America, if left unchecked, could open the way for more dangerous threats, such as increased levels of public sector corruption, the penetration of the political and security systems by criminals, and the loss of effective governmental control over territory. Our partners in Central America have made some progress in their own efforts to fight transnational organized criminal networks, and while much remains to be done, they are demonstrating an unprecedented willingness to work with us and each other to address these issues.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI) represents a U.S. partnership with the nations of Central America to address the corrosive effects of gangs, narcotics and arms trafficking, and organized crime on citizen safety. The regional initiative supports host-government strategic initiatives and the FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plans of the U.S. Embassies in Central America. The initiative also supports INL's FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Counternarcotics, Transnational Crime and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

CARSI provides funding in a range of areas, including direct law enforcement cooperation, assistance for law enforcement and justice sector capacity building, and prevention programs aimed at addressing the root causes of crime and violence. We recognize the immediate need to combat the criminal organizations and associated violence; the medium-term requirement to augment the capabilities of civilian law enforcement and security entities; and the long-term necessity of strengthening judicial and other state institutions to resist corruption and improve the administration of justice. The programs will strive to address citizen safety, borders and ports, youth issues (including anti-gang efforts), and counternarcotics.

Objective 1: Create safe streets for the citizens in the region.

Objective 2: Disrupt the movement of criminals and contraband within and between the nations of Central America.

Objective 3: Support the development of strong, capable, and accountable Central American Governments.

Objective 4: Re-establish effective state presence and security in communities at risk.

Objective 5: Foster enhanced levels of security and rule of law coordination and cooperation between nations of the region.

FY 2012 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

- Funds will support on-going law enforcement operations and justice sector reform in Central America to establish and sustain professional and accountable law enforcement services. Programs may advance regional police training and equipment and assist in addressing the porous borders through which transnational criminal organizations traffic firearms, bulk cash, narcotics, and other illicit contraband.

Counternarcotics

- Funds will combat rising international drug trafficking in Central America. Support may include continuation of successful Drug Enforcement Administration, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and vetted units; continue support for demand reduction programs such as Drug Abuse Resistance Education; continue to support existing aviation assets in Guatemala; and continue to provide for enhanced regional land and maritime interdiction capabilities and logistics supports.

Transnational Crime

- Funds will seek to minimize the adverse effects of criminal activities in Central America and improve citizen safety. Efforts may include support for in-service training and capacity enhancements of law enforcement personnel, including anti-gang training and support for Model Precincts; training and technical assistance on financial crimes and asset forfeiture for the region; and advancing programs that improve regional cooperation and operations.

Rule of Law Human Rights

- Funds will seek to advance citizen safety, law enforcement, and rule of law activities in Central America. Efforts may include improving courts administration, management and processes; building the capacity of prosecutors and improving collaboration between civilian prosecutors and judicial or police investigators; addressing juvenile justice and juvenile post-prison rehabilitation; improving prison administration, management, and processes; supporting police academies and entry-level training and curricula; and advancing modern policing training and techniques, including through technical assistance and support in high-risk areas.

U.S. Department of State, 2012

Document: International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2012 Program and Budget Guide

Country: Western Hemisphere Regional

Program Overview

The Western Hemisphere regional request includes INCLE funding for both the Central America Regional Security Initiative and Caribbean Basin Security Initiative. The following provides summary information for both programs. In addition, detailed information on both programs is provided in the following chapters.

- Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI): Citizen safety in Central America is deteriorating rapidly as criminal organizations seek to establish strongholds in the region. Funds will continue to support training and build capacity of law enforcement and rule of law institutions throughout Central America, with less focus on procurement of equipment. Funds will support efforts to address border and port security; continue support for vetted units and maritime and land interdiction; sustain the final year of the four-year investment for aviation based in Guatemala; and continue to build capacity of law enforcement and other actors to address transnational crime, including anti-gang training. Funds will also support improved prison management and equipment, and encourage cooperation and joint operations throughout the region. The program reduces funds for basic law enforcement equipment, while continuing to provide programs that support justice sector reform and local capabilities.

- Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI): Funding will continue to support efforts to combat illicit trafficking and organized crime, strengthen the rule of law, reduce the demand for illegal drugs, and promote social justice in the Caribbean region. Funding will be directed primarily toward enhancing the capacity of criminal justice and regional security institutions such as the Regional Security System in the Eastern Caribbean but will also provide technical assistance to support the investigation and prosecution of financial crimes, prison reform, maritime interdiction, and border control efforts.

U.S. Department of State, 2012

Document: International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2012 Program and Budget Guide

Country: Uruguay

Program Overview

Drug trafficking in Uruguay continues, and the presence of Mexican, Colombian and Eastern European traffickers is increasing, despite concerted and consistent government efforts to combat these trends. Despite high profile successes such as the seizure of over two metric tons of cocaine in October 2009 and the arrest of a prominent Colombian trafficker in February 2010, Uruguay will depend on international training and support until it can modernize its police and judicial system. Program support in Uruguay is a strategic decision at this juncture that will be key to ensuring continued commitment by Uruguay's new government. Bilateral relations on counternarcotics and money laundering have been excellent over the past two years, and U.S. funds have permitted significant advances in investigation technology. There has been increasing cooperation with counterparts in Argentina and major progress in prosecutions and asset forfeiture.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Uruguay program supports the embassy's FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plan priority to Improve Homeland Security by Helping Uruguay Combat Terrorism and Transnational Crime and INL's FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goal of Counternarcotics, Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform, and Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: Strengthen Uruguay's technical and operational ability to interdict narcotics, conduct complex criminal investigations, and arrest traffickers.

Objective 2: Strengthen Uruguay's rehabilitation and prevention programs to reduce and prevent the consumption of illegal drugs, and to assist with the reinsertion of addicts into society.

FY 2012 Program

Interdiction: Funds will provide training, equipment and other support to modernize and enhance the capabilities of the national drug police, who continue to have shortages in these critical areas. Specifically, funds will help support the border offices and Real-Time Analytical Intelligence Database (RAID) of the Directorate for the Suppression of Illicit Trafficking in Drugs (DGRTID).

Demand Reduction: Funds will support ongoing demand reduction programs to identify high-risk populations and build host nation capacity to serve them. Currently, limited resources reach only a small percentage of drug addicts. A 2011 National Drug Use Survey, partially funded by the USG, is establishing a baseline of drug use trends in the country and will enable the Embassy and Government of Uruguay to better target their demand reduction programming. Funds will continue to support rehabilitation and prevention programs directed at high-risk populations.

U.S. Department of State, 2012

Document: International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2012 Program and Budget Guide

Country: Peru

Program Overview

Peru is a major cocaine producing country, exporting to markets in South America, Mexico, the United States, and Europe. The U.S. Crime and Narcotics Center estimated that Peru had 40,000 hectares (ha) used for coca cultivation nationwide in 2009. Authorities eradicated 12,033 ha of illicit coca in the Upper Huallaga Valley (UHV) and Ucayali department during 2010, a figure higher than the 10,000 ha target set at the beginning of the year. Eradication, linked closely to alternative development programs, has led to dramatic reductions of coca cultivation in the UHV, where eradication efforts have been focused. This dramatic reduction in coca cultivation is particularly evident in San Martin department. However, challenges remain in other parts of the country where State presence is limited and where increased coca cultivation and trafficking have been reported, such as in the Apurimac and Ene River Valley (VRAE). Peru is a key U.S. partner in the region and we are committed to working with the Government of Peru (GOP) to effectively address illicit coca cultivation, narcotics trafficking, and the related transnational criminal challenges that follow while building institutional capacity.

Program Goals and Objectives

The USG supports programs that enhance the capabilities of the Peruvian National Police (PNP) and that of the Anti-Narcotics Directorate (DIRANDRO) to provide security for eradication teams and interdiction in coca cultivation and narcotics trafficking zones. USG counternarcotics assistance also helps the Peruvian government publicize links between drug production and common crime so that Peruvians understand that their quality of life is degraded by drug trafficking. Embassy Lima ranked keeping drug production and trafficking in check as one of their top priorities in the Mission Strategic and Resource Plan. The Garcia administration's counternarcotics strategy coincided with U.S. goals, clearly linking interdiction and eradication with alternative development and prevention. The objectives and goals also reflect INL's FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals, notably, counternarcotics, transnational crime, and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR). We seek a similar strong cooperative relationship with the Humala administration.

Objective 1: Build institutional capability to investigate and prosecute transnational crimes, as well as eradicate illicit crops and interdict drugs and precursors produced within or transiting through Peru.

Objective 2: Assist law enforcement to conduct criminal and financial investigations that will result in arrests and prosecutions of trafficking organizations.

Objective 3: Combat corruption, especially within the Peruvian National Police force.

Objective 4: Improve police capabilities to provide for citizens' safety and contribute to the enhancement of the rule of law.

Objective 5: Improve community awareness of the negative effects of illicit drug use and to support community anti-drug coalitions.

FY 2012 Program

Counternarcotics

- Eradication: Coca and Poppy Eradication and Crop Monitoring Funds will provide operational support for the labor intensive manual eradication program managed under the Coca Monitoring and Reduction Agency (CORAH), including transport, food, salaries, field gear and tools, tents, first aid, and training for the eradicators. Funding will also support technical assistance for the Corps for Assistance to Alternative Development (CADA), the Peruvian agency that monitors and maps coca and poppy cultivation, which provides a means to verify eradication results. As an independent entity, CADA collaborates with the UN and GOP to develop and utilize monitoring methodologies. Funds will support the work of the Tropical Cultivations Institute (ICT), which conducts alternative crop research, as well as support agricultural extension services that facilitate and hasten coca growers' transition to production of licit crops. Aviation support for eradication will cover operating and maintenance assistance for Peru's aviation police (DIRAVPOL), including airlift for eradication and logistical support. These funds support pilots, aircrews, and associated personnel for 24 USG-owned Huey-II helicopters, two fixed-wing aircraft, and limited operational support for Peruvian MI-17 helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, all in support of coca eradication and related law enforcement activities east of the Andes. Training for pilots and mechanics, maintenance, hangars, warehousing, aircraft rental when needed, and operational support for DIRAVPOL personnel also receive funding.

- Interdiction: Law enforcement funding will provide support to the PNP to enhance law enforcement capabilities and counternarcotics interdiction efforts. Funds will be used for items such as vehicles, communications equipment, and field gear. Funds will also be used for training and field exercises designed to enhance PNP Anti-Narcotics police capabilities, as well as those of other police units. The increase of Peru's counternarcotics police personnel in source zones over the last five years has contributed to more effective and sustained eradication and interdiction operations. Funding will support PNP education improvements, including curriculum reform, as well as PNP basic police academies and pre-academies strategically located in communities in coca source zones east of the Andes, including support for operational effectiveness and infrastructure improvements. Support will also include capacity-building initiatives to address citizens' safety, such as community policing and model police stations. Funds will support the development of the Ministry of Interior's Executive Office for Drug Control, including addressing management capacity and the handling of seized assets. Port security support funds will continue to improve the GOP's capacity to examine cargo and passengers through facilities improvements, equipment acquisitions, and training. Peruvian Customs funds will bolster inspection and enforcement operations by Peruvian Customs at principal airports and seaports as well as other smaller installations. This support will include Customs' canine program and acquisition of computers and non-intrusive inspection equipment, along with renovation of existing facilities. Aviation support for interdiction will provide operating and maintenance assistance for interdiction airlift to DIRAVPOL including logistical support for counternarcotics units. The nationalization plan for Peru includes scaling back aviation assistance. Funds will support pilots, aircrews, and support personnel for USG-owned Huey-II helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, plus provide limited operational support for Peruvian helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, but support will be reduced from previous years as Peru takes on increased responsibility for and title to some aircraft. These activities support coca eradication and other law enforcement efforts east of the Andes. Funds will also support training for pilots and mechanics, maintenance, hangars, warehousing, aircraft rental when needed, and operational support for DIRAVPOL personnel.

- Administration of Justice/Prosecution: Funds will provide training and some travel expenses to support GOP prosecutors assigned to oversee drug enforcement operations, including investigation and trial preparation. Funds will support advanced training for prosecutors already in the program and entry-level training for new prosecutors. Funds will support training and technical assistance for prosecutors to learn better case management practices.

- Demand Reduction: Funding will support the work of NGOs such as the Information and Education Center for the Prevention of Drug Abuse (CEDRO) to reduce drug abuse among youth, research drug abuse trends, focus on educational workshops, and train teachers and health professionals about illicit drug use. Funds will be used to purchase promotional materials and publications used in Community Anti-Drug Coalition (CAC) campaigns, train community-based facilitators in the CAC model, and sponsor public events designed to publicize CAC activities. Funds will implement a modern media campaign to increase drug awareness and deter youth from abusing drugs. In addition, there will be an expansion of school-based drug education programs in the capital and in strategic provinces.

Transnational Crime

- Money Laundering: Funds will support a series of seminars and training programs for police, prosecutors, and judges in all aspects of detecting, investigating, and prosecuting money laundering crimes which will be organized by the Organization of American States' Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission and the United Nations. Funds will continue to support Peru's Financial Investigative Unit to analyze financial transactions, report on suspicious activities, and assist investigations of financial crimes.

- Asset Forfeiture: Funds will assist in the implementation of asset seizure and forfeiture laws and strengthen the seized asset management regime through the provision of training, advising, exchange of best practices, and work with U.S. partners.

U.S. Department of State, 2012

Document: International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2012 Program and Budget Guide

Country: Paraguay

Program Overview

Paraguay is a major drug transit country for Andean-sourced cocaine and a principal money laundering center. The Tri-Border Area (TBA) where Paraguay intersects with Brazil and Argentina is a hub for trafficking in drugs, contraband and pirated goods, arms, and persons. The Lugo administration has expressed strong political will to curb narcotics trafficking and has been a solid partner with the United States. FY 2012 funds will maintain support for counternarcotics efforts and provide support for new rule of law activities to strengthen judicial institutions – judges, prosecutors and police – and address pervasive corruption and impunity.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Paraguay program supports the embassy's FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plan priority of Disrupting Criminal Organizations and INL's FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Transnational Crime, Counternarcotics, and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

Objective 1: Fortify Paraguay's institutional and operational capability to combat criminal activity in an effort to deter or disrupt criminal organizations, prevent terrorism, and combat transnational crime, terrorism financing, and narcotics trafficking.

Objective 2: Help Paraguay enhance measures to address corruption and address the challenges that constrict its ability to prosecute and convict narcotics traffickers and other perpetrators of transnational crime.

FY 2012 Program

Counternarcotics

- Interdiction: Funds will provide training and technical assistance to the Anti-Narcotics Secretariat (SENAD) and the Paraguayan National Police (PNP) to improve operational capacity to investigate and prosecute major traffickers and money launderers. Assistance will provide training for special agents and attorneys in investigative and prosecutorial procedures as well as operational support such as per diem for joint investigations with the DEA. Support will also provide commodities, such as replacement computers, as well as maintenance of the drug analysis laboratory equipment. Funds will also provide ongoing support to SENAD's narcotics detection canine program and demand reduction program. This assistance complements other resources targeting anti-corruption efforts.

Rule of Law and Human Rights

- Constitution, Laws and Legal Framework: Support will include training prosecutors and judges on key legislation to fortify Paraguay's operational and legal capability to combat criminal activity, as well as address corruption. Such training will be designed to encourage Paraguayan authorities to pass legal reforms that will allow prosecutors to effectively prosecute criminals.

U.S. Department of State, 2012

Document: International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2012 Program and Budget Guide

Country: Mexico

Program Overview

Due to the high demand for illicit narcotics in our country, the United States has a shared responsibility for combating the crime and violence that so gravely affect citizens throughout the region. Roughly ninety-five percent of all the cocaine consumed in the United States transits through Mexico and Central America. The Mexico INCLE program builds on efforts begun under the Merida Initiative, with a shift away from expensive equipment and towards supporting Mexican government institutional reforms and strengthening rule of law. These programs are designed to complement renewed U.S. efforts at home to reduce drug demand, to stop the flow of weapons, and bulk cash generated by illicit drug sales, and to confront gangs and criminal organizations.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Mexico program supports the Mexican Government's significant investment in promoting rule of law, providing for citizen security, and reforming state institutions towards greater transparency, responsiveness, and respect for human rights. Merida Initiative Programs will focus on four strategic areas: disrupt capacity of organized crime to operate; institutionalize capacity to sustain rule of law; create a 21st century border structure; and build strong and resilient communities. The program supports the Embassy's priorities reflected in its FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plan related to promoting : a) Security and Protection of the U.S. and Mexican People, and b) People and the Future: Building Communities and Supporting Youth on Both Sides of the Border. The program also supports INL's goals of Counternarcotics, Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR), and Transnational Crime as stated in its FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan.

The four strategic objectives of the Merida Initiative in Mexico are:

Objective 1: Dismantle organized criminal groups by building Mexican law enforcement capacities in information collection and analysis, training and equipping units, and conducting investigations against organized crime, money laundering, arms trafficking, and other crimes.

Objective 2: Institutionalize justice-sector reforms to sustain the rule of law and respect for human rights through continued large-scale institution building projects with security and judicial institutions at the federal level and expanded efforts at state and local institutions.

Objective 3: Create efficient, economically competitive borders crossings along Mexico's northern and southern borders that ensure “secure two-way flows” of travelers and trade; improve enforcement cooperation between ports of entry; and reduce the flow of drugs to the north, and guns and bulk cash to the south.

Objective 4: Build strong and resilient communities with long-term alternatives to working for organized crime, and that understand and are engaged in Mexico's legal and judicial reforms.

FY 2012 Program

Disrupting Capacity of Organized Crime to Operate

- Financial crimes and asset forfeiture programs, which include training, information technology equipment, and other support, will strengthen Mexico's ability to target money-laundering, the financial underpinning of the drug cartels. Training, equipment, and other support for specialized units, increasingly at the state and local levels, will focus investigations on all arms of organized crime, while allowing for their rapid and safe deployment to areas of concern. Information technology and training will continue to support a Government of Mexico (GOM) project to develop and implement an advanced information-sharing system that integrates public security, law enforcement, immigration and related information into one place, making the information available to all law enforcement agencies.

Institutionalize Capacity to Sustain Rule of Law

- Law enforcement training and professionalization at the federal level, and increasingly at the state and local level, will enable the military to stand down from its law enforcement and counternarcotics role. This training will include a human rights element. Training, technical assistance, limited equipment, and other support will assist federal and state judicial systems to implement necessary reforms. Topics may include trial advocacy skills, development of criminal procedure codes, and evidence collection and chain of custody, among others. Internal controls and anti-corruption programs will continue to provide technical assistance, equipment, training, and other support to target corruption and build trustworthy institutions. Funds will continue to support the development and implementation of the national police registry to weed out corrupt police. Funds will support technical assistance, equipment and training to bring Mexico's forensics laboratories into conformity with international standards and modernize the Office of the Attorney General's and Federal Police's evidence examination abilities. Training, equipment, and technical expertise will be provided to continue support for significant prison reforms and prison system expansion. Prosecutors and other justice sector officials will be trained in support of Mexico's transition to an oral, accusatorial judicial system.

Create a 21st Century Border Structure

- Assistance will provide training and other support to boost border inspection capabilities. Trained canine teams will target illegal activity, especially along the border with the United States. Funds may continue support for a training academy for the Customs Secretariat.

Build Strong and Resilient Communities

- Continued support for drug demand reduction efforts will include assistance for prevention, treatment, and continuation of drug courts. Support will continue for a secure and anonymous citizen complaint project that will promote public engagement in the fight against illegal activity. Training in strategic messaging will promote the rule of law through media and other fora, and continue to help inform the public about institutional reforms and efforts being undertaken through the Merida Initiative.

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International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement:

Program Description

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement:

Law

Grant Aid Table Sources:

  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bahamas 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Guatemala 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Jamaica 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2006; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, FY 2008 Program and Budget Guide (Washington: U.S. Department of State, September 2007) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bahamas 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Jamaica 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Venezuela 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2007; - United States, Department of State, FY 2009 International Affairs (Function 150) Budget Request--Summary and Highlights (Washington: Department of State: February 4, 2008) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Guatemala 2007; - United States, Department of State, FY 2009 International Affairs (Function 150) Budget Request--Summary and Highlights (Washington: Department of State: February 4, 2008) (Link to source). United States, Department of State, Memorandum of Justification under Section 451 of the Foreign Assistance Act for the Use of Funds or Counterdrug and Law Enforcement Programs in Central America (Washington: Department of State, September 28, 2007) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Central America Regional 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Honduras 2007; - United States, Department of State, Memorandum of Justification under Section 451 of the Foreign Assistance Act for the Use of Funds or Counterdrug and Law Enforcement Programs in Central America (Washington: Department of State, September 28, 2007) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Argentina 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bahamas 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Chile 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Dominican Republic 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Eastern Caribbean 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement El Salvador 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Guatemala 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Honduras 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Jamaica 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Paraguay 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Trinidad and Tobago 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2008; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2010 (Washington: Department of State). (International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2009; - United States, Department of State, Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide, Fiscal Year 2011 Budget (Washington: Department of State: 2010) (Link to source). U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Common Enemy, Common Struggle: Progress in U.S.-Mexican Efforts to Defeat Organized Crime and Drug Trafficking (Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, May 18, 2010) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Argentina 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Central America Regional 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Paraguay 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2009; - United States, Department of State, Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide, Fiscal Year 2011 Budget (Washington: Department of State: 2010) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Argentina 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Caribbean Regional 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Central America Regional 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Costa Rica 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Guatemala 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Paraguay 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2010; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2012 (Washington: Department of State, 2011) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Caribbean Regional 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Central America Regional 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Guatemala 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Paraguay 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2011; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2013 (Washington: Department of State, 2012) (Link to source).

Economic Aid Table Sources:

  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement ; -

Trainees Table Sources:

  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Antigua and Barbuda 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Dominica 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement St. Kitts and Nevis 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement St. Lucia 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement St. Vincent and the Grenadines 2006; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007: A Report to Congress (Washington: August 2007) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2007; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2007 and 2008 (Washington: January 2008) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2008; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2008 and 2009 (Washington: January 2011) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Dominican Republic 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2009; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010 (Washington: February 2011) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2010; - U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, "Common Enemy, Common Struggle: Progress in U.S.-Mexican Efforts to Defeat Organized Crime and Drug Trafficking" (Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, May 18, 2010) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Dominican Republic 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2010; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011 (Washington: February 2012) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2011; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2012 (Washington: December 2012) (Link to source).

Sales Table Sources:

  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement ; -

Deployments Table Sources:

  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement ; -