Excerpts From Official Descriptions of Aid to Peru

  • The U.S. Southern Command 2012 New Horizons Humanitarian Exercise Underway in Peru reports that Exercises aid to Peru will do the following:
    "New Horizons Peru 2012 officially started with an opening ceremony featuring senior leaders from both the Peruvian and United States governments at the Tambo de Mora construction site June 5.

    The Peruvian and U.S governments are working together to bring New Horizons to the Ica and Huancavelica regions of Peru. About 500 U.S. military doctors, engineers and support staff will take part in this exercise.

    ...

    Service members participating in New Horizons 2012 will be giving free medical care to more than 30,000 patients in 12 different locations, perform approximately 200 surgeries and building three new structures for community use, in addition to enhancing international disaster response capabilities and cooperation.

    ...

    New Horizons began in the mid-1980's and since then, Airmen and members of other services working under U.S. Southern Command have built schools, community centers, provided medical care and much more in efforts to form everlasting friendships between the United States and the Latin American and Caribbean nations."
  • The U.S. Department of Defense 2012 Section 1209 and Section 1203(b) Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Years 2008, 2009, and 2010 reports that Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance aid to Peru will do the following:
    "CN support has been instrumental in refurbishing and improving the riverine capabilities of the Peruvian Navy along the Putumayo, Ene, and Huallaga rivers."
  • The U.S. Department of Defense 2012 Section 1209 and Section 1203(b) Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Years 2008, 2009, and 2010 contains this description of Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance aid to Peru:
    "USSOUTHCOM’s counterdrug programs continue to provide the Colombian military battlefield training techniques that have significantly reduced the death rate from wounds to rates equivalent to U.S. forces. These capabilities are now being exported via Colombian subject matter expert exchanges into other PN security forces in countries like Peru and Panama."
  • The U.S. Department of State 2012 International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2012 Program and Budget Guide reports that International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement aid to Peru will do the following:
    "Program Overview

    Peru is a major cocaine producing country, exporting to markets in South America, Mexico, the United States, and Europe. The U.S. Crime and Narcotics Center estimated that Peru had 40,000 hectares (ha) used for coca cultivation nationwide in 2009. Authorities eradicated 12,033 ha of illicit coca in the Upper Huallaga Valley (UHV) and Ucayali department during 2010, a figure higher than the 10,000 ha target set at the beginning of the year. Eradication, linked closely to alternative development programs, has led to dramatic reductions of coca cultivation in the UHV, where eradication efforts have been focused. This dramatic reduction in coca cultivation is particularly evident in San Martin department. However, challenges remain in other parts of the country where State presence is limited and where increased coca cultivation and trafficking have been reported, such as in the Apurimac and Ene River Valley (VRAE). Peru is a key U.S. partner in the region and we are committed to working with the Government of Peru (GOP) to effectively address illicit coca cultivation, narcotics trafficking, and the related transnational criminal challenges that follow while building institutional capacity.

    Program Goals and Objectives

    The USG supports programs that enhance the capabilities of the Peruvian National Police (PNP) and that of the Anti-Narcotics Directorate (DIRANDRO) to provide security for eradication teams and interdiction in coca cultivation and narcotics trafficking zones. USG counternarcotics assistance also helps the Peruvian government publicize links between drug production and common crime so that Peruvians understand that their quality of life is degraded by drug trafficking. Embassy Lima ranked keeping drug production and trafficking in check as one of their top priorities in the Mission Strategic and Resource Plan. The Garcia administration's counternarcotics strategy coincided with U.S. goals, clearly linking interdiction and eradication with alternative development and prevention. The objectives and goals also reflect INL's FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals, notably, counternarcotics, transnational crime, and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR). We seek a similar strong cooperative relationship with the Humala administration.

    Objective 1: Build institutional capability to investigate and prosecute transnational crimes, as well as eradicate illicit crops and interdict drugs and precursors produced within or transiting through Peru.

    Objective 2: Assist law enforcement to conduct criminal and financial investigations that will result in arrests and prosecutions of trafficking organizations.

    Objective 3: Combat corruption, especially within the Peruvian National Police force.

    Objective 4: Improve police capabilities to provide for citizens' safety and contribute to the enhancement of the rule of law.

    Objective 5: Improve community awareness of the negative effects of illicit drug use and to support community anti-drug coalitions.

    FY 2012 Program

    Counternarcotics

    - Eradication: Coca and Poppy Eradication and Crop Monitoring Funds will provide operational support for the labor intensive manual eradication program managed under the Coca Monitoring and Reduction Agency (CORAH), including transport, food, salaries, field gear and tools, tents, first aid, and training for the eradicators. Funding will also support technical assistance for the Corps for Assistance to Alternative Development (CADA), the Peruvian agency that monitors and maps coca and poppy cultivation, which provides a means to verify eradication results. As an independent entity, CADA collaborates with the UN and GOP to develop and utilize monitoring methodologies. Funds will support the work of the Tropical Cultivations Institute (ICT), which conducts alternative crop research, as well as support agricultural extension services that facilitate and hasten coca growers' transition to production of licit crops. Aviation support for eradication will cover operating and maintenance assistance for Peru's aviation police (DIRAVPOL), including airlift for eradication and logistical support. These funds support pilots, aircrews, and associated personnel for 24 USG-owned Huey-II helicopters, two fixed-wing aircraft, and limited operational support for Peruvian MI-17 helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, all in support of coca eradication and related law enforcement activities east of the Andes. Training for pilots and mechanics, maintenance, hangars, warehousing, aircraft rental when needed, and operational support for DIRAVPOL personnel also receive funding.

    - Interdiction: Law enforcement funding will provide support to the PNP to enhance law enforcement capabilities and counternarcotics interdiction efforts. Funds will be used for items such as vehicles, communications equipment, and field gear. Funds will also be used for training and field exercises designed to enhance PNP Anti-Narcotics police capabilities, as well as those of other police units. The increase of Peru's counternarcotics police personnel in source zones over the last five years has contributed to more effective and sustained eradication and interdiction operations. Funding will support PNP education improvements, including curriculum reform, as well as PNP basic police academies and pre-academies strategically located in communities in coca source zones east of the Andes, including support for operational effectiveness and infrastructure improvements. Support will also include capacity-building initiatives to address citizens' safety, such as community policing and model police stations. Funds will support the development of the Ministry of Interior's Executive Office for Drug Control, including addressing management capacity and the handling of seized assets. Port security support funds will continue to improve the GOP's capacity to examine cargo and passengers through facilities improvements, equipment acquisitions, and training. Peruvian Customs funds will bolster inspection and enforcement operations by Peruvian Customs at principal airports and seaports as well as other smaller installations. This support will include Customs' canine program and acquisition of computers and non-intrusive inspection equipment, along with renovation of existing facilities. Aviation support for interdiction will provide operating and maintenance assistance for interdiction airlift to DIRAVPOL including logistical support for counternarcotics units. The nationalization plan for Peru includes scaling back aviation assistance. Funds will support pilots, aircrews, and support personnel for USG-owned Huey-II helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, plus provide limited operational support for Peruvian helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, but support will be reduced from previous years as Peru takes on increased responsibility for and title to some aircraft. These activities support coca eradication and other law enforcement efforts east of the Andes. Funds will also support training for pilots and mechanics, maintenance, hangars, warehousing, aircraft rental when needed, and operational support for DIRAVPOL personnel.

    - Administration of Justice/Prosecution: Funds will provide training and some travel expenses to support GOP prosecutors assigned to oversee drug enforcement operations, including investigation and trial preparation. Funds will support advanced training for prosecutors already in the program and entry-level training for new prosecutors. Funds will support training and technical assistance for prosecutors to learn better case management practices.

    - Demand Reduction: Funding will support the work of NGOs such as the Information and Education Center for the Prevention of Drug Abuse (CEDRO) to reduce drug abuse among youth, research drug abuse trends, focus on educational workshops, and train teachers and health professionals about illicit drug use. Funds will be used to purchase promotional materials and publications used in Community Anti-Drug Coalition (CAC) campaigns, train community-based facilitators in the CAC model, and sponsor public events designed to publicize CAC activities. Funds will implement a modern media campaign to increase drug awareness and deter youth from abusing drugs. In addition, there will be an expansion of school-based drug education programs in the capital and in strategic provinces.

    Transnational Crime

    - Money Laundering: Funds will support a series of seminars and training programs for police, prosecutors, and judges in all aspects of detecting, investigating, and prosecuting money laundering crimes which will be organized by the Organization of American States' Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission and the United Nations. Funds will continue to support Peru's Financial Investigative Unit to analyze financial transactions, report on suspicious activities, and assist investigations of financial crimes.

    - Asset Forfeiture: Funds will assist in the implementation of asset seizure and forfeiture laws and strengthen the seized asset management regime through the provision of training, advising, exchange of best practices, and work with U.S. partners.

    "
  • The Department of State 2011 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report reports that International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement aid to Peru will do the following:
    "The USG assists the GOP in eradication, interdiction, and control of precursor chemicals; maritime enforcement, port and airport security, and chemical field testing. To reduce dependence on illicit coca cultivation, the USG also assists with alternative development and good governance. Additionally, the USG supported counter-terrorism activities (which include counternarcotics operations in the major drug source zones of the UHV and VRAE); the refurbishment of police bases and enhanced police training that increased police presence and improved police operational capabilities. In the VRAE, the USG supported the Peruvian military with training, equipment, technical advice, and intelligence to enhance their capacity to combat SL, which is now responsible for much of the narcotics trade in the VRAE, and to increase state presence in this remote area. Law enforcement officials from other Andean countries also participated in some of these activities, strengthening regional counternarcotics cooperation.

    The Alternative Development (AD) element continued to consolidate gains in coca-growing regions in 2011. United States Agency for International Development (USAID) continued working in San Martin with the private sector and transferred AD activities to regional and local governments, farmer associations, and other agents. This allowed the redeployment of resources to newly eradicated areas in Ucayali and Huanuco Regions under the post-eradication strategy. In 2011, alternative development activities began in areas of high-coca production in Huanuco Region. A total of 17,535 farmers received technical assistance to maintain 35,682 ha of licit crops, including 3,356 ha of new crops in 2011. Total sales of these crops were $30.8 million in the first six months of 2011. Licit incomes of participant families continued to increase, rising 24 percent from 2009 to 2010.

    As Peru's counternarcotics programs mature and economic growth forecasts remain strong, the USG expects the GOP to increasingly take the lead in counternarcotics efforts. Recently, Peru's Aviation Police (DIRAVPOL) assumed responsibility for purchasing and transporting jet fuel; the USG expects this trend to continue in 2012."
  • According to the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Defense 2009 Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010, the U.S. government will fund the following activities in Peru:
    "Peru maintains a strong bilateral relationship with the United States. The United States seeks to strengthen Peru's democratic institutions and its ability to interdict and disrupt narcotics production and distribution. The United States has enjoyed excellent cooperation from the Government of Peru and the administration of President Alan Garcia on Counternarcotics (CN) activities.

    Training in civil-military relations, the rule of law and discipline in military operations, and comprehensive security responses to terrorism helps reinforce the notion of civilian control of the military and reinforces support for the principles of human rights. Training in port security, joint operations, maintenance management, and helicopter and outboard motor repair provide the tools needed to professionalize and modernize Peru's military and enhance its capabilities in air operations, search and rescue, and demining operations. This training is particularly important in supporting the 1998 border dispute settlement between Peru and Ecuador. Finally, significant training efforts in the area of counterdrug operations are underway. These activities include training to improve helicopter and other aircraft capabilities, as well as participation in training exercises with U.S. forces to improve interoperability. The Peruvian military continues to conduct operations against insurgents and narcoterrorists.

    Professionalization of the Peruvian military will help make these operations more efficient while training the military to avoid the excesses of counterinsurgency efforts of past decades as recently reported by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Acting on the Commission's recommendations, which include reforming the military as an institution, will be important for Peruvian society to continue developing ongoing CN and Counterterrorism (CT) operations while respecting the rule of law and human rights. The Peruvian military's increased participation in Peacekeeping Operations (PKO) training and exercises, as well as their ongoing contributions to the UN Mission in Haiti, MINUSTAH (Mission des Nations Unies pour la stabilisation en Haïti), with hopes of gaining additional PKO capability, has also been a source of pride and has helped to improve their image. Peru has recently become a Global Peace Operations Initiative (GPOI) partner of the United States, and is training engineering and infantry PKO troops.

    The Emergency Tactical Actions Group, a branch of the Peruvian National Police, formally manages Peru's CT program. Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) funds have already allowed Peruvians to attend courses designed to help them better understand international CT defense and the dynamics of international terrorism. These funds have also allowed for participation in CT military education team training, as well as courses in intelligence in combating terrorism - all geared to improving Peru's ability to counter the international threat of terrorism.

    As a means of strengthening defense ties, the United States welcomes participation from Peru in the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses. These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations, and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Peru."
  • The U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Defense 2008 Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2008 and 2009 says this about aid to Peru:
    "Peru maintains a strong bilateral relationship with the United States. The United States seeks to strengthen Peru's democratic institutions and its ability to interdict and disrupt narcotics production and distribution. The United States has enjoyed excellent cooperation from the Government of Peru and the administration of President Alan Garcia on Counternarcotics (CN) activities.

    Training in civil-military relations, the rule of law and discipline in military operations, and comprehensive security responses to terrorism helps reinforce the notion of civilian control of the military and reinforces support for the principles of human rights. Training in port security, joint operations, maintenance management, and helicopter and outboard motor repair provide the tools needed to professionalize and modernize Peru's military and enhance its capabilities in air operations, search and rescue, and demining operations. This training is particularly important in supporting the 1998 border dispute settlement between Peru and Ecuador. Finally, significant training efforts in the area of counterdrug operations are underway. These activities include training to improve helicopter and other aircraft capabilities, as well as participation in training exercises with U.S. forces to improve interoperability. The Peruvian military continues to conduct operations against insurgents and drug traffickers. Professionalization of the Peruvian military will help make these operations more efficient while training the military to avoid the excesses of counterinsurgency efforts of past decades as recently reported by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Acting on the Commission's recommendations, which include reforming the military as an institution, will be important for Peruvian society to continue developing ongoing CN and Counterterrorism (CT) operations while respecting the rule of law and human rights. The Peruvian military's increased participation in Peacekeeping Operations (PKO) training and exercises, as well as their ongoing contributions to the UN Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), with hopes of gaining additional PKO capability, has also been a source of pride and has helped to improve their image. Peru has recently become a Global Peace Operations Initiative (GPOI) partner of the United States, and is training engineering and infantry PKO troops.

    The Emergency Tactical Actions Group, a branch of the Peruvian National Police, formally manages Peru's CT program. FY 2007 Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) funds allowed this unit to train more effectively and improve its skills in planning initiatives against complex targets and local threats imposed by terrorist organizations in Peru. CTFP funds have already allowed Peruvians to attend courses designed to help them better understand international CT defense and the dynamics of international terrorism. These funds have also allowed for participation in CT military education team training, as well as courses in intelligence in combating terrorism - all geared to improving Peru's ability to counter the international threat of terrorism.

    As a means of strengthening defense ties, the United States welcomes participation from Peru in the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses. These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations, and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Peru."
  • According to the U.S. Department of State 2011 Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Program and Budget Guide, Fiscal Year 2011, International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement will fund the following activities in Peru:
    "

    Program Overview

    Peru is the second largest cocaine producing country in the world and a major exporter of cocaine and cocaine base to markets in South America, Mexico, the United States, and Europe. The U.S. Crime and Narcotics Center estimated that in 2008, 41,000 hectares of coca were under cultivation in Peru. In 2009, the Government of Peru (GOP) manually eradicated 10,025 hectares of illicit coca. Eradication, linked closely to alternative development programs, has led to dramatic reductions of coca cultivation in the Upper Huallaga Valley where eradication efforts are focused; this is particularly evident in San Martin department. However, challenges remain in other parts of the country where State presence is limited, and where increased coca cultivation and trafficking have been reported, such as in the Apurimac and Ene River Valley (VRAE). Peru is a key U.S. partner in the region and we are committed to working with the GOP to effectively address illicit coca cultivation, narcotics trafficking, and the related transnational criminal challenges that follow.


    Program Goals and Objectives

    The USG supports programs that enhance the capabilities of the Peruvian National Police (PNP) and that of the Anti-Narcotics Directorate to provide security for eradication teams and interdiction in hard-core coca cultivation and narcotics trafficking zones. USG counternarcotics assistance also helps the Peruvian government publicize links between drug production and common crime so that Peruvians understand that their quality of life is degraded by drug trafficking. Embassy Lima ranked disruption of criminal organizations and combating narcotics trafficking as one of their top ranked priorities in the Mission Strategic Plan. The Garcia administration’s counternarcotics strategy coincides with U.S. goals, clearly linking interdiction and eradication with alternative development and prevention. The objectives and goals also reflect INL's FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals, notably, counternarcotics, transnational crime, and criminal justice sector capacity building.

    Objective 1: Build institutional capability to investigate and prosecute transnational crimes as well as to eradicate illicit crops and interdict drugs and precursors produced within or transiting through Peru.

    Objective 2: Assist law enforcement to conduct criminal and financial investigations that will result in arrests and prosecutions of trafficking organizations.

    Objective 3: Combat corruption, especially within the Peruvian National Police force.


    Objective 4: Improve police capabilities to provide for citizens' safety and contribute to the enhancement of the rule of law.

    Objective 5: Improve community awareness of the negative effects of illicit drug use and to support community anti-drug coalitions.

    FY 2011 Program

    Eradication: Coca and Poppy Eradication and Crop Monitoring Funds will provide operational support for the labor intensive manual eradication program managed under the Coca Monitoring and Reduction Agency (CORAH), including transport, food, salaries, field gear and tools, tents, first aid, and training for the eradicators. Funding will also support technical assistance for CADA (Corps for Assistance to Alternative Development), the agency that monitors and maps coca and poppy cultivation; providing a means to verify eradication results. As an independent entity, CADA collaborates with the UN and GOP to develop and utilize monitoring methodologies. Funds will support the work of the Tropical Cultivations Institute (ICT) which conducts alternative crop research, as well as support agricultural extension services that facilitate and hasten coca growers’ transition to production of licit crops. Aviation Support for eradication will cover operating and maintenance assistance for Peru's aviation police (DIRAVPOL), including airlift for eradication and logistical support. These funds support pilots, aircrews, and associated personnel for 24 USG-owned Huey-II helicopters, three fixed-wing aircraft, and limited operational support for Peruvian MI-17 helicopters, and fixed-wing aircraft, all in support of coca eradication and related law enforcement activities east of the Andes. Training for pilots and mechanics, maintenance, hangars, warehousing, aircraft rental when needed, and operational support for DIRAVPOL personnel also receive funding. This is an ongoing project.


    Interdiction: Law enforcement funding will provide support to the PNP to enhance law enforcement capabilities and counternarcotics interdiction efforts. Funds will be used for items such as vehicles, communications equipment, and field gear. Funds will also be used for training and field exercises designed to enhance PNP Anti-Narcotics police capabilities, as well as those of other police units. The increase of Peru's counternarcotics police personnel in source zones over the last five years has contributed to more effective and sustained eradication and interdiction operations. Funding will support PNP education improvements and PNP basic police academies and pre-academies strategically located in communities in coca source zones east of the Andes, including support for operational effectiveness and infrastructure improvements. Funds will support the development of the Ministry of Interior's Executive Office for Drug Control, including addressing management capacity and the handling of seized assets. Port security support funds will continue to improve the Government of Peru’s capacity to examine cargo and passengers through facilities improvements, equipment acquisitions, and training. Emphasis will be placed on the renovation and development of additional interdiction facilities at key seaports and airports. Peruvian Customs funds will bolster inspection and enforcement operations by Peruvian Customs at principal airports and seaports as well as other smaller installations. This support will include Customs’ canine program, and acquisition of computers and non-intrusive inspection equipment, along with renovation of existing facilities. Aviation Support for interdiction will provide operating and maintenance assistance for interdiction airlift to DIRAVPOL including logistical support for counternarcotics units. Funds will support pilots, aircrews, and support personnel for 24 USG-owned Huey-II helicopters, three fixed-wing aircraft, plus provide limited operational support for Peruvian MI-17 helicopters, and fixed-wing aircraft, all of which support coca eradication and other law enforcement efforts east of the Andes. Funds will also support training for pilots and mechanics, maintenance, hangars, warehousing, aircraft rental when needed, and operational support for DIRAVPOL personnel. This is an ongoing project.

    Demand Reduction: Funding will support the work of NGOs such as the Information and Education Center for the Prevention of Drug Abuse (CEDRO) to reduce drug abuse among youth, to research drug abuse trends, to focus on educational workshops, and to train teachers and health professionals about illicit drug use. Funds will be used to purchase promotional materials and publications used in Community Anti-Drug Coalition (CAC) campaigns, to train community-based facilitators in the CAC model, and to sponsor public events designed to publicize CAC activities. Funds will implement a modern media campaign to increase drug awareness and deter youth from abusing drugs. In addition, there will be an expansion of school-based drug education programs in the capital and in strategic provinces. This is an ongoing project.

    Administration of Justice/Prosecution: Funds will provide training and some travel expenses to support GOP prosecutors assigned to oversee drug enforcement operations, including investigation and trial preparation. Funds will support advanced training for prosecutors already in the program and entry-level training for new prosecutors. Funds will support training and technical assistance for prosecutors to learn better case management practices. This is an ongoing project.

    Money Laundering: Funds will pay for a series of seminars and training programs for police, prosecutors, and judges in all aspects of detecting, investigating, and prosecuting money laundering crimes which will be organized by OAS/CICAD and the United Nations. Funds will continue to support Peru’s Financial Investigative Unit to analyze financial transactions, report on suspicious activities, and assist investigations of financial crimes. This is an ongoing project.

    "
  • According to the U.S. Department of State 2009 2009 End-Use Monitoring Report, International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement will fund the following activities in Peru:
    "LIMA

    Background

    EUM Program Coordinator

    Richard Loveland, Tel. 618-2815, rloveland@naslog.org.pe

    Inventory System

    Post uses Microsoft Access software with an integrated bar code system

    Staff Members EUM Responsibilities

    Logistics Staff - The Logistics Management Adviser in Lima is principally responsible for developing and implementing EUM procedures. He monitors the scheduling of inspections and actively participates in EUM inspections. He participates and monitors reconciliation of inventories and discrepancies. He instructs staff; monitors and documents donations and transfer and disposal of materials. He is also responsible for Customs clearances of all counternarcotics materials.

    The Senior Logistics Supervisor in Pucallpa actively participates in EUM inspections and monitors reconciliation of inventories and discrepancies. He instructs staff and monitors and documents the disposal of materials at the Forward Operating Base (FOB).

    Two Logistics Specialists in Lima and one Logistics Technician in Pucallpa, along with other logistics duties, are responsible for a large percentage of the travel to counterpart sites to physically verify existence, condition and proper use of donated materials. This staff works closely with the Logistics Management Adviser in developing and implementing EUM procedures. It recommends and verifies disposal of inoperative or obsolete materials.

    The Vehicle Maintenance Supervisor works closely with counterparts to recommend, coordinate, and supervise disposal by auction or other means of obsolete and inoperative donated vehicles. On occasions, they coordinate and oversee repairs of donated vehicles.

    The Logistics Customs Agent, along with other Customs and freight related duties, obtain Customs clearances for all counternarcotics materials. He also participates in preliminary inspections and inventories in bonded warehouses prior to Customs release.

    The Logistics Customs Technician obtains Customs clearance and conducts preliminary inspections and inventories in bonded warehouses prior to Customs processing and release.

    The Logistics Customs Dispatchers conduct preliminary inspections and inventories received at bonded warehouses to facilitate Customs release and to deliver materials to the NAS warehouse.

    NAS Aviation Staff - The Embassy Field Coordinator coordinates all flights, fixed-wing and rotary-wing, and monitors aircraft.

    The NAS Field Adviser/Security Specialist, along with the daily duties, is responsible for providing oversight of all USG materials or equipment donated and or used by the counterparts and for advising Logistics of any notable damage or missing items.

    NAS Police Staff - The NAS Senior Police Adviser authorizes donations

    Deputy Police Adviser oversees use and maintenance of donated equipment; the Logistics Administrative Coordinators receive and distribute materials to Forward Operations Locations (FOL's); the Logistics Coordinators maintain inventories.

    Police Field Adviser-The Police Field Adviser authorizes and oversees use of donated equipment and materials and oversees use and maintenance of donated equipment.

    Police Program Assistant receives and maintains records of all Police Program donated items.

    CORAH staff - CORAH is the GOP coca eradication agency. CADA is a subsidiary of CORAH and is responsible for coca management and eradication verification. CADA is funded by the NAS under a different budget. The CORAH staff is also responsible for oversight of NAS funding of the Instituto de Cultivos Troppicales (ICT), a NGO that conducts studies on cacao and coffee cultivation as alternative crops to coca. Additionally, ICT conducts soils studies and extension training for farmers.

    The Narcotics Control Officer authorizes donations.

    The Eradication Operations Officer is principally responsible to oversee correct usage and maintenance of NAS donated property in the field and CORAH (Ministry of Interior) warehouses.

    ICT - This institute is mentored by the NAS CORAH Project and is visited periodically for oversight of activities funded by NAS and EUM.

    DEA - The Program Logistics Specialist for the Sensitive Investigation Unit is responsible for conducting an annual inventory of donated items and delivering equipment to Peruvian National Police (PNP) and responsible for coordinating donations with the NAS. The DEA Special Agents also assist as required...

    MAAG - The Air Force Section Chief is responsible for developing and implementing EUM Standard Operating Procedures for the MAAG, and actively participates in EUM inspections when visiting Peruvian Air Force (FAP) installations throughout the entire country.

    The Army Section Chief actively participates in EUM inspections when visiting Peruvian Army installations throughout the entire country. He also monitors donations to EP.

    The Navy Section Chief actively participates in EUM inspections when visiting Peruvian Navy (MGP) installations throughout the entire country. He also monitors donations to MGP.

    All listed counterparts have facilitated access and provided cooperation during EUM inventories/inspections and, in general, responded well in inventory reconciliation when requested. Most counterparts also maintain detailed inventories of materials received. NAS Logistics has not experienced any serious problems with counterpart cooperation this year.

    Counterpart Agencies

    Superintendencia Nacional de Aduanas (SUNAT)
    Aduana-Aerea brigade de operaciones expeciales (SUNAT-AERA)
    Intendencia Nacional de Prevencio Del Contrabando Y control Fronterizo-Boe (SUNAT-MARTIMA)
    Intendencia de Aduana Postal (SUNAT_POSTAL)
    Autoridad Portuatia Nacional OPD (Organiso Publico Decentralizado (APN)
    Business Allinace for Secure Commerce–Basic Peru
    Centro de Informacion y Educacion Para la Prevencion del Abuso de Drogas (CEDRO)
    Centro de Estudios de Prevencion Tratamiento Investigacion y de Salud (CEPTUS)
    Capital Humand y Social Alternativo (CHSA)
    Control y Reduccion del cdultivo de la Coca en el Alto Huallaga (CORAH)
    Cuerpo de Asistencia para el Desarrollo Alternativo (CORAH-CADA)
    Cooporacion Peruana de Aeropuertos Aviacon Comerciall S.A (CORPAC)
    Presidente de la Corte Superior de Ucayalo (Juzgado de Aguaytia) (COORTE SUPERIOR UCAYALI)
    Centro de Estudios y Assesoria en Conductas de Riesgo Social y Promocion Desarrollo Integral (CREWSIER)
    Comision Nacional Para el Desarrollo y vida sin Drogas (DEVIDA)
    Dialogo Ciudadano (Diqalogto Ciudadano)
    Direccion General de Migraciones y Naturalizacion (DIGEMIN)
    Ejercito Peruano (EP)
    Fuerza Aerea del Peru (FAP)
    FAP-Comando de Operaciones-Centro de Informacion de Defensa Aerea Nacional (FAP-COMOP-CIDAN)
    FAP-Direccion de Inteligencia-Centro de Inteligencia Aerotecnica (FAP-DIFAP-CINAT)
    Congregacion Hermanas Adoratrices (HNAS DORATRICES)
    Instituto de Cultivos Tropicals (ICT)
    Instituto de Educacion y Salud (IES)
    Asociacion Kallpa-Para la Promocion Integraol de lea Salud y el Desarrollo (KALLPA)
    Ministerio del Interior-Oficina de Asuntos Internos (MINISTER-ASUNTOS INTGERNOS)
    Ministry of Interior-Oficina de comunicacion Social MINISTER-OCOSMIN)
    Minister-Oficina Ejecutva de Control de Drogas (MINISTER-OFECOD)
    Mininter-Oficina General de Defensa Nacional (MINISTER-OGDEN)
    Ministerio Publico-Fiscalio de La Nacion-Segunda Fiscalia Suprema Especializada en (MP-FN-SFSP-FEA)
    Ministerio de Transportes y Comunicaciones-direccion Aeronautica Civil-Direccion Di (MTC-DGAC-TID)
    Marina de Guerra del Peru-Direccion de Capitania de Puertos-Ofinina de Coordinacion (NAVY_DICAPI)
    PNP-Direccion de Instruccion Escuela Tecnico Superior (PNP-DINST-ETS)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Centro Operative Polical (PNP-DIRANDRO-CEOPOL)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogaqs-Destacamento Antidrogas (PNP-DIRANDRO –DAD)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Departmento de Operacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DEPOTAD)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-direccion Nacional Antidrogas Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ-DIE)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division of Investigacion Fim (PNP-DIRANDRO-DINFI)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Direccion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIRECCION)
    Pollicia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Dieeccion Nacional Antidragas-Division de Investigation (PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID-AIR)
    Police Nacional del Peru Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID-DIE)
    PNP Dirandro Division de Operaciones Especialses Antidrogas (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD)
    PNP-Dirandro Division de Operaciones Especiales Antidrogas-Departmento de Operations (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES1)
    PNP-Dirandro-Division de Operaciones Especiales Antidrogas-Departmento de Operations (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES2)
    PNP-Dirandro-Division de Operaciones Especiales Antidrogas-Departmento de Operations (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES3)
    PNP-Dirandro Divoed-Departmento de Operaciones Especiales –Control de Insumos (PNP/DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES-CIQPF)
    PNP-Dirandro Division de Operaciones Especiales Androgas-Unidad Canina (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-K9)
    PMP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Division de Operaciones Tacticas Antidrogas (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD)
    PNP-Direccion Antidrogas-Equipo Inteligencia (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD-EQUINT)
    PNP-Dirrecion Nacional Antidrogas Division de Prevencion del Trafico Ilicito del Drug (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVITID)
    PNP-Dirandro Division de Prevencion del /trafico Ilicito de Drogas Proyeccion Social (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVPTID-PROY.SOCIAL)
    PNP-Dirreccion Nacional Antidrogas-Escuela de Investicion del Trafico Ilicito de (PNP-DIRANDRO-ESINTID)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-estado Mayor (PNP-DIRANDRO-ESTADO-MAYOR)
    PNP-Direnado-Jefature de Estado Mayor (PNP-DIRANDRO-JEM)
    PNP-Dirandro-Oficina de Administration (PNP-DIRANDRO-OFAD)
    PNP-Dirandro-Oficina Administrativa-Unidad de Recursos Humanos
    PNP-Direccion de Operaciones Antidrogas Oficina de Analysis Especial (PNP-DIRANDRO-OFANESP)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Oficina de Criminalistica (PNP/DIRANDRO-OFCRI)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Oficina de Inteligencia (PNP-DIRANDRO of INT)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Departmento de Opeeraciones Tacticas Antidrogas (PNP-DIREADRO-OFINT-RIG)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Ofina de Inteligencia-Unidad de contrainteligent (PNP-DIRANDRO-OFINT-UNICOUNT)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Odicina de Telematica (PNP-DIRANDRO-OFITEL)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Secretaria (PNP-DIRANDRO SECRETARIA)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Telematica (PNP-DIRANDRO TELEMATICA)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Unidad de Informacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-UNINFO-RR-PP)
    PNP-Direccion Antigragas Unidad de Planeamiento Operative (PNP-DIRANDRO UPO)
    PNP-Direccion de Aviacion Policial (PNP-DIRAVPOL)
    PNP-Direccion Ejectiva de Operaciones Policials (PNP-DIREOP)
    PNP Direccion General Tribunal Adminitrativo Disciplinary Nacional (PNP-DIRGEN-TRIADN)
    PNP-Direccion de Investigacion Criminalistica y Apoyo a la Justicia (PNP-DIRINCRI)
    PNP-Direccion de Inteligencia (PNP-DIRINT)
    PNP-Direccion de Seguridad Publica-Division de Operacciones Especiales (PNP-DIRSEPUB)
    PNP-Direccion de Turismo y Ecologia Division de Policia Ecologica (PNP-DITUEC-DIVPOECA)
    PNP-Division Antidragas (PNP-DIVANDRO)
    PNP-Division Antidragas Departmento Caning Political (PNP-DIVANDRO-DEPCAPOL)
    PNP-Direccion Frente Policial Huallaa Oficina de Inteligencia Provincial (PNP FPH-OFINPRO)
    PNP-Direccion Frente Policial Huallaga-Oficina de Inteligencia Provincial (PNP-FPH-OFINPRO)
    Xi Direccion Territorial de Policial Ayacucho (PNP-IX-DIRTEPOL)
    PNP-Seguridad del Estado Departmento de Extranjeria Aijch (PNP-SE-DEPEXT)
    PNP-V Region Policial Direccion General (PNP-V-REGION DIRECCION)
    PNP-V Region Policial Unidad de Inteliencia (PNP-V REGION INTELLIGENCIA PRISMA)
    Minisgerio de la Produccion Direccion de Insumos y Productos Quimicos Fiscaizados Proyecto luli (PRODUCE PROYECTO LULU)
    Servicios Urbanos y Mujeres de Bajos Ingresos (SUMBI)
    Unidad de Ingelobencia Financiera (UIF)

    Receipt

    Items authorized by Project Advisers for donation are issued to counterparts with a computerized document of issue detailing description, model, make, serial number, EUM bar code number, etc. and followed up with a letter of donation presented to the commander/director of the unit/section stating the terms to include a recall if the item is found not to be used as indicated. The NAS has included a statement in its donation letters clarifying that if no acceptance of donation response is received within 30 days of the letter, the NAS will consider the donation as accepted. This was required due to some counterparts delaying acceptance and official transfers to them thus compelling the NAS to cover vehicle insurance and other owner related expenses.

    Monitoring Procedures

    On-Site Inspections

    There were 63 scheduled inspections in 14 cities during 2009 of 1,675 items. The number of items subject to inspection was 4,778. The percentage of donated items inspected was 35%. The balance was inspected in 2007. Unscheduled inspections are practically impossible as coordination for access to bases, warehouses and offices are normally granted by commanders/directors upon receipt of a written request.

    A staffing change and the associated training of a replacement caused an appropriate 4 month delay and resulted in a lower than usual number of site visits in 2009. An increase in the number of scheduled inspections is planned for 2010 which will return Peru to its normal schedule.

    07/30/2009- CEDRO
    10/23/2009- CEPTIS
    07/30/2009- CORAH
    07/31/2009- CORAH-CADA
    09/30/2009- CRESAR
    07/20/2009- ADUANAS
    10/23/2009- ADUANAS MARITIMA
    08/12/2009- DEVIDA
    09/23/2009- DIALOGO CIUDADANO
    06/06/2009- EP
    08/11/2009- MINISTER-OCOSMIN
    08/11/2009- MINISTER-OFECOD
    08/11/2009- MINISTER-OGDN
    09/29/2009- MP-FN-SFSP-FEA
    09/30/2009- NAVY-DICAPI
    05/21/2009- PNP-DINST-ETS
    11/18/2009- PNP-DIANDRO-DEPOTAD
    09/23/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ
    09/25/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ-DIE
    09/25/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID
    09/25/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVEAD
    11/23/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES1
    07/08/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES2
    04/21/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES-CIQPF
    10/01/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD PNP
    04/21/2009- DIRANDRO-OFAD
    09/30/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO-OFINT
    10/01/2009- PNP-DIRENDRO-OFINT-RIG
    10/28/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO-OFITEL
    10/26/2009- PNP-DIRAVPOL
    10/02/2009- PNP-DIRANDRO
    10/26/2009- PNP-DIRAVPOL
    04/24/2009- PNP-IX DIRTEPOL
    10/02/2009- PNP-V REGION DIRECCION
    09/29/2009- PNP-V REGION INTELIGENCIA
    01/21/2009- PRODUCE
    01/10/2009- SUMBI

    Secondary Method of Monitoring Resource Status

    The NAS requests annual inventories from all counterparts in possession of commodities donated under the bilateral agreement. Counterparts normally comply.

    In some cases involving extremely small and remote sites with just a few items, NAS Logistics communicates with the counterpart and without stating the serial number requests that they confirm an item and give NAS the correct serial number on specific pieces of equipment. When the counterpart responds with the correct number, it would indicate that the piece of equipment is at that location. The NAS will then request operational status. If the counterpart does not respond with the proper serial number, NAS Logistics conducts follow up questioning.

    Status-Commodities

    Canine Program

    Thirteen (13) dogs were provided to the DNCD in 2005. Four are in Punta Cana; five in La Romana; four in Santo Domingo. They are used for explosives detection. Twelve are in good health; one dog in Punta Cana is ill and will soon be retired.

    Computer Equipment

    The NAS continues to donate computer systems to Peruvian counterpart institutions for use in counternarcotics and data keeping. These systems are located at Forward Operating Locations (FOL's) and maintained by the NAS IT section. As the units become obsolete, they are upgraded or replaced with new units. Computer systems have been donated to NGO's with the majority located in Lima. Maintenance for the systems remains the sole responsibility of the counterpart.

    Communications Equipment

    Additional base stations and hand-held radios were donated to the Peruvian Police and CORAH to improve coordination and communications for interdiction and eradication. These items are maintained by the counterpart with oversight from the NAS and monitored during EUM inspections.

    Surveillance Equipment

    The NAS Port program donated a computerized surveillance system to augment an existing system at the sea port in Callao. The existing system had several serious blind spots which make it possible for Port personnel to manipulate cargo in shipping containers after they had been inspected. During installation of the additional system, the NAS IT encountered considerable interference and delay by Port authorities which were finally overcome and the project was completed. Although the NAS IT has spent a considerable amount of time training SUNAT personnel to monitor and record events at the Port, consistent results continue to be hampered.

    Vehicles

    NAS Peru donated a total of 60 vehicles during 2009, 56 of which are motorcycles. The major of these vehicles were donated to the Peruvian Police Drug Units. The units have responsibility for maintenance. The NAS occasionally funds and oversees some repairs and maintenance due to lack of funding on the behalf of the GOP.

    CORAH
    Motocar 1
    Motorcycle 1
    Pickup 7
    Sedan 1
    SUV 1
    Truck 14

    ADUANAS
    Vans 5
    Fork lift 1

    CORAH-CADA
    Pickup 11

    CORPAC
    Aircraft Tug 2


    ICT
    Motorcycle 4
    Pickup 3
    Tractor 1

    FAP
    Aircraft Tug 2

    MP-FN-SFSP-FEA
    Pickup 12

    PNP-DINST-ETS
    Pickup 3
    motorcycle 3

    ASJUR
    Sedan 1

    DEPOTAD
    Motorcycle 13
    Pickup 25
    SUV 1
    Tractor 3
    Van 1

    PNP DIRANDRO DICIQ
    Sedan 6
    Pickup 3
    Motorcycle 1

    DINFI
    Sedan 1
    Pickup 2

    DIRECCION
    Sedan 3
    Pickup 1
    SUV 2

    DITID
    Motorcycle 1
    Pickup 5
    Sedan 4
    Van 1


    AIR
    Pickup 2
    Van 1

    SERPOST
    Van 1

    DIVOEAD-DEPOES1
    Pickup 5
    Motorcycles 6
    Taxi 1

    DIVOEAD-DEPOES2
    Pickup 4
    Motorcycle 1

    DIVOEAD
    Pickup 34
    Motorcycle 64
    SUV 3
    Tractor 1
    Van 1

    DIVOEAD-DEPOES-CIQPF
    Pickup 3
    Motorcycle 1

    DIVOTAD
    Motocar 1
    Pickup 11
    Motorcycle 19
    Suv 1

    EQUINT
    Taxi 1
    Motorcycles 3

    DIVPTID
    Pickup 1

    PROY SOCIAL
    Pickup 1

    ESINTID
    Sedan 2
    Van 1


    JEM
    Sedan 2
    SUV 1

    OFAD
    Pickup 2
    Sedan 1
    Truck 3
    Van 1

    OFANESP
    Pickup 10
    Sedan 17
    Van 3
    Station wagon 2
    Motorcycle 5

    UNIREHUM
    Sedan 1

    OFCRI
    Pickup 1

    OFINT
    Pickup 20
    Sedan 1
    Van 2
    SUV 1
    Motorcycle 8
    Motocar 4

    OFINT-RIG
    Pickup 5
    Motorcycle 6

    UNICOINT
    Sedan 1
    Motorcycle 1

    SECRETARIA
    Motorcycle 1

    UNINFO
    Pickup 1

    DIRAVPOL
    Pickup 2
    Truck 3
    SUV 1
    Forklift 1
    Van 1

    DIVANDRO
    Pickup 7

    Vessels

    The NAS did not donate any vessels in 2008. The vessels donated in prior years are maintained by the Peruvian Coast Guard. Many of the smaller craft are presently inoperative due to lack of funds.

    NAVY-DICAPI
    Fiber glass 2
    Wood boat 2
    Zodiac 6

    DIRANDRO-DEPOTAD
    Aluminum boat 4
    Zodiac 2

    DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD
    Aluminum boat 1
    Zodiac 1

    DIRANDRO-OFANESP
    Aluminum boat 1

    DIRANDRO-OFINT-RIG
    Aluminum boat 1

    INTELIGENCIA
    Aluminum boat 1

    DIVANDRO
    Aluminum boat 2

    NAS/Police
    Zodiac 3

    Weapons

    All weapons are closely monitored by NAS personnel during routine inspections. They are distributed in various locations throughout the country, mostly on Peruvian Police bases.

    NAVY-DICAPI
    M-60 rifle 80

    DIRANDRO-DAD
    M-60 rifle 8

    DIRANDRO-DEPOTAD
    M16A2 49
    M-60 rifle 41

    DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD
    M-16A2 rifle 78
    M-60 37

    DIVOTAD
    M-60 rifle 12

    DIRANDRO-OFAD
    M16A2 rifle 5
    M-60 rifle 2

    DIRAVPOL
    M-23 armament subsystem 15
    M-60 rifle 20
    M-60 rifle 20

    Aircraft

    The four C-26 Aircraft donated to the Peruvian Air Force and supported by NAS Aviation assisted GOP and CN/CT operations. NAS Aviation installed a forward Looking Inferred (FLIR) digital camera from one C-26 to the other as needed for operations. It is used for reconnaissance and identifying clandestine runways and drug production activities. The C-26's are also used in support of Joint Armed Forces Command and Peruvian Police Command. They are also used for transporting Peruvian CN police units.

    The total number of A-37's the FAP has in the inventory is 23. Of these, six are static displays at different locations. Of the remaining 17, only four to six are operational (the number fluctuates). The remaining aircraft are in various states of disrepair. At one time, they had 40 but over the years, 14 have been lost in accidents and three have disappeared. The A-37 has three missions: counterdrug, primary interceptor and advance fighter tactics training for fighter pilots.

    Peruvian Air Force
    C-26 4
    A-37 31

    X-Ray Units

    Several sophisticated X-ray units, mobile and stationary, including body scanners have been donated to Customs for use at the principal airports and sea ports of Peru. They are used to scan air cargo and passengers along with shipping containers. They are maintained by a contract with the vendor's local representative. Cooperation between Customs and DIRANDRO (Peruvian Drug Police) has caused delays this year.

    Status-Services

    Construction Services

    Construction project in Ayacucho -100% completed
    Sant Lucia Base-2nd phase-46% completed
    Expansion of Canine areas-95% completed

    Demand Reduction Services

    Combating TIP- NAS Lima engages with the NGO sector, multi-national organizations, the police and various Peruvian government agencies to train police, prosecutors, and judges to recognize TIP cases; make the appropriate changes; provide victim assistance; enforce existing TIP laws; and raise general public awareness.

    Public Awareness Campaign on Drug Consumption

    The campaign engages and educates children, parents, policy makers and the general public on the growing use of and availability of illegal drugs not just in the schools, but in the neighborhoods and on the streets.

    Anti-Drug Community Coalitions

    The coalition creates grass roots neighborhood organizations with representatives from different sectors of the community to identify community level problems; engage the police; and work together towards creative solutions.

    The community anti-drug coalitions in Peru received funding to work on two main goals: 1) reducing substance abuse among youth by promoting a healthy lifestyle free of drugs and reducing risk factors in a community contest; 2) establishing and strengthening the collaboration among local sectors and law enforcement authorities, to support the efforts to prevent and reduce substance abuse among youth.

    The model has different strategies to monitor the impact and progress toward the main goals, to achieve community changes by providing information, enhancing skills, providing support, enhancing access and enforcing laws and politics, changing the physical design or structure of the environment to reduce risk factors and enhance protective factors among other initiatives.

    Media/Monitoring Services

    The services include the monitoring of pro-narcotics trafficking messaging east of the Andes and the daily monitoring of all radio and television news outlets broadcasting in controlled areas of the country.

    The services provide an alternative voice-radio and internet news service and comprehensive reporting for the narco-controlled areas east of the Andes as a counter voice to the pro-cocalero, pro-narcotrafficker, and anti-alternative development messages that dominate the airways in these regions.

    The academic voice supports academic research and discussion of the issue of narcotics and narcotic trafficking in Peru, to fuel the policy debate.

    Program Impact

    NAS Aviation Commodities/Service

    The donation of miscellaneous equipment by NAS Aviation improved eradication and CN interdiction operations in Santa Lucia, Tingo Maria and Palma Palmpa.

    The two C-26 aircraft donated in prior years to the Peruvian Air Force and supported by NAS Aviation assisted GOP and CN/CT operations. The NAS spent $2,075,000 in 2009 which included a maintenance, training, and operations package. NAS Aviation interchanges a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) digital camera from one C-26 to the other as needed for operations and is used for reconnaissance operations and identifying clandestine runaways and drug production activities. A digital camera has been purchased by the NAS, installed in one FAP C-26 in January 2008, but is awaiting repair. Modification of the C-26 was completed in August of 2007 at the facility of ARINC contractor in Oklahoma.

    In 2009, these aircraft equipped as such and in coordination with the Peruvian National Police (PNP) ground units, provided locating data for interdiction operations. The aircraft also increased security providing nocturnal FLIR imaging of NAS eradication sites.

    The C-26s also participated in the DEA region-wide all inclusive exercise. The C-26's are also used in support of Joint Armed forces Command and Peruvian Police Command and for transporting Peruvian CN Police Units.

    CORAH Commodities/Services

    INL Project funds provided through NAS Lima are the sole source of funding for CORAH and CADA in support of their mission (coca eradication and monitoring).

    CORAH conducted a total of 285 eradication mission during 2009, eradicating 10,025.03 hectares which exceeded the projected goal of 8,000 hectares.

    The majority of commodities purchased included satellite imagery, survey equipment, communications, computer equipment and field gear. These commodities permitted CORAH and CADA to perform the functions required to conduct eradication in a programmed manner. These functions include identification of coca growing areas, quantification of coca under cultivation, physical eradication of coca in the field, reporting and verification.

    ICT Commodities/Services

    ICT through NAS Lima partially funds the Instituto de Cultivos Tropicales (ICT) in support of their activities.

    ICT worked in 260 locations primarily in Huanuco and San Martin Provinces. ICT conducted 250 educational events mostly related to cacao and coffee cultivation methods to increase production. However, they also conducted limited work in Amazonas, Loreto, Cajamarca and Piura Departments, as well as in Quillamba, Cusco and the Valley of the Apurimac and the Ene Rivers (VRAE). They conducted 221 educational events (courses, orientations, etc) mostly related to cacao cultivation methods to increase production. ICT provided technical assistance to about 2,725 beneficiaries in support of 4,504 hectares of cacao. The technical assistance consisted of agricultural technique demonstrations, rehabilitation of plants, monitoring, maintenance, seedbed installation, etc. They were an integral part in the creation of an agricultural cooperative (“ASSOCIACION KALLPA”) dedicated to cacao commercialization. This cooperative has 885 members presently and their goal is 1,500. Major commodity purchased with NAS provided funding was very limited in 2009. These purchases included six motorcycles.

    Problems and Corrective Action Plan

    Unmonitored Commodities

    Three hundred two (302) items or 18 percent of the items subject to inspection at visited sites were not able to be inspected for various reasons. The items are being researched and/or are awaiting responses from counterparts.

    Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

    On occasion, donated vehicles do not receive proper maintenance due to lack of counterpart funding. The NAS is obligated to cover repairs and maintenance to keep the vehicles operative. This only applies to special cases approved by the individual Project Adviser.

    Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

    Two body scans originally received in country in February 2008 and donated to Customs for use at airports had not been installed. This was corrected in 2009, all fur body scanners donated to UNAT Customs were installed, two at the International Airport in Lima, one at the International airport in Cuzco, and one at the International Land port of Entry in Tacna.

    Demand Reduction

    The Hauncayo and Piura Prosecutors Offices also have copy machines that were not being used at the time of inspection due to lack of funds for toner. This lack of use has been communicated to the Program Adviser.

    Other Problems

    In 2008, NAS logistics report had concern over the accuracy of reports being sent to INL due to several projects having their own logistics sections, warehouses, procedures, and forms and not being required to report or advise the principal NAS Logistics section of their transactions.

    Being principally responsible for accurate tracking of EUM materials, NAS Management directed that all logistics operations report directly to NAS logistics to standardize forms and procedures, to improve reporting accuracy and security of materials. Management implemented a procedural change improving communications by having the NAS Police logistics personnel responsible for the reporting of inventories and materials issued to NAS' Principal Logistics section. Steps were taken to eliminate the restricted access to NAS Police warehouses for NAS Logistics inspectors.

    "
  • The U.S. Department of State 2008 2008 End-Use Monitoring Report contains this description of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement aid to Peru:
    "LIMA

    Background

    EUM Program Coordinator
    Richard Loveland, Tel. 618-2815, rloveland@naslog.org.pe

    Inventory System
    Post uses Microsoft Access software with an integrated bar code system.

    Staff Members EUM Responsibilities

    Logistics Staff
    The Logistics Management Adviser in Lima is principally responsible for developing and implementing EUM procedures. He monitors the scheduling of inspections and actively participates in EUM inspections. He participates and monitors reconciliation of inventories and discrepancies. He instructs staff; monitors and documents donations and transfer and disposal of materials. He is also responsible for Customs clearances of all counternarcotics materials.

    The Senior Logistics Supervisor in Pucallpa actively participates in EUM inspections and monitors reconciliation of inventories and discrepancies. He instructs staff and monitors and documents the disposal of materials at the Forward Operating Base (FOB).

    Two Logistics Specialists in Lima and one Logistics Technician in Pucallpa, along with other logistics duties, are responsible for a large percentage of the travel to counterpart sites to physically verify existence, condition and proper use of donated materials. This staff works closely with the Logistics Management Adviser in developing and implementing EUM procedures. It recommends and verifies disposal of inoperative or obsolete materials.

    The Vehicle Maintenance Supervisor works closely with counterparts to recommend, coordinate, and supervise disposal by auction or other means of obsolete and inoperative donated vehicles. On occasions, they coordinate and oversee repairs of donated vehicles.

    The Logistics Customs Agent, along with other Customs and freight related duties, obtain Customs clearances for all counternarcotics materials. He also participates in preliminary inspections and inventories in bonded warehouses prior to Customs release.

    The Logistics Customs Dispatchers conduct preliminary inspections and inventories received at bonded warehouses to facilitate Customs release and to deliver materials to the NAS warehouse.

    NAS Aviation Staff
    The Embassy Field Coordinator coordinates all flights, fixed-wing and rotary-wing, and monitors aircraft.

    The NAS Field Adviser/Security Specialist, along with the daily duties, is responsible for providing oversight of all USG materials or equipment donated and or used by the counterparts and for advising Logistics of any notable damage or missing items.

    NAS Police Staff
    The NAS Senior Police Adviser authorizes donations; the Deputy Police Adviser oversees use and maintenance of donated equipment; the Logistics Administrative Coordinators receive and distribute materials to Forward Operations Locations (FOL"s); the Logistics Coordinators maintain inventories.

    NAS Posts/Maritime Staff
    The NAS Port Program Adviser authorizes and oversees use of donated equipment and materials; the NAS Port Police Program specialist oversees use and maintenance of donated equipment.

    CORAH staff-CORAH is the GOP coca eradication agency. CADA is a subsidiary of CORAH and is responsible for coca management and eradication verification. CADA is funded by the NAS under a different budget. The CORAH staff is also responsible for oversight of NAS funding of the Instituto de Cultivos Troppicales (ICT), a NGO that conducts studies on cacao and coffee cultivation as alternative crops to coca. Additionally, ICT conducts soils studies and extension training for farmers.

    The Narcotics Control Officer authorizes donations; the Eradication Operations Officer is principally responsible to oversee correct usage and maintenance of NAS donated property.

    ICT-This institute is mentored by the NAS CORAH Project and is visited periodically for oversight of activities funded by NAS and EUM.

    DEA-The Program Logistics Specialist for the Sensitive Investigation Unit is responsible for conducting an annual inventory of donated items and delivering equipment to Peruvian National Police (PNP).

    MAAG-The Air Force Section Chief is responsible for developing and implementing EUM Standard Operating Procedures for the MAAG, and actively participates in EUM inspections when visiting Peruvian Air Force (FAP) installations throughout the entire country.

    The Army Section Chief actively participates in EUM inspections when visiting Peruvian Army installations throughout the entire country. He also monitors donations to EP.

    The Navy Section Chief actively participates in EUM inspections when visiting Peruvian Navy (MGP) installations throughout the entire country. He also monitors donations to MGP.

    All listed counterparts have facilitated access and provided cooperation during EUM inventories/inspections and, in general, responded well in inventory reconciliation when requested. Most counterparts also maintain detailed inventories of materials received. NAS Logistics has not experienced any serious problems with counterpart cooperation.

    Counterpart Agencies

    Superintendencia Nacional de Aduanas (SUNAT)
    Aduana-Aerea brigade de operaciones expeciales (SUNAT-AERA)
    Intendencia Nacional de Prevencio Del Contrabando Y control Fronterizo- Boe (SUNAT-MARTIMA)
    Intendencia de Aduana Postal (SUNAT_POSTAL)
    Autoridad Portuatia Nacional OPD (Organiso Publico Decentralizado (APN) Business Allinace for Secure Commerce–Basic Peru
    Centro de Informacion y Educacion Para la Prevencion del Abuso de Drogas (CEDRO)
    Centro de Estudios de Prevencion Tratamiento Investigacion y de Salud (CEPTUS)
    Capital Humand y Social Alternativo (CHSA)
    Control y Reduccion del cdultivo de la Coca en el Alto Huallaga (CORAH)
    Cuerpo de Asistencia para el Desarrollo Alternativo (CORAH-CADA)
    Cooporacion Peruana de Aeropuertos Aviacon Comerciall S.A (CORPAC) Presidente de la Corte Superior de Ucayalo (Juzgado de Aguaytia) (COORTE SUPERIOR UCAYALI)
    Centro de Estudios y Assesoria en Conductas de Riesgo Social y Promocion
    Desarrollo Integral (CREWSIER)
    Comision Nacional Para el Desarrollo y vida sin Drogas (DEVIDA)
    Dialogo Ciudadano (Diqalogto Ciudadano)
    Direccion General de Migraciones y Naturalizacion (DIGEMIN)
    Ejercito Peruano (EP)
    Fuerza Aerea del Peru (FAP)
    FAP-Comando de Operaciones-Centro de Informacion de Defensa Aerea Nacional (FAP-COMOP-CIDAN)
    FAP-Direccion de Inteligencia-Centro de Inteligencia Aerotecnica (FAP-DIFAP-CINAT)
    Congregacion Hermanas Adoratrices (HNAS DORATRICES) Instituto de Cultivos Tropicals (ICT)
    Instituto de Educacion y Salud (IES)
    Asociacion Kallpa-Para la Promocion Integraol de lea Salud y el Desarrollo (KALLPA)
    Ministerio del Interior-Oficina de Asuntos Internos (MINISTER-ASUNTOS INTGERNOS)
    Ministry of Interior-Oficina de comunicacion Social MINISTER-OCOSMIN)
    Minister-Oficina Ejecutva de Control de Drogas (MINISTER-OFECOD) Mininter-Oficina General de Defensa Nacional (MINISTER-OGDEN)
    Ministerio Publico-Fiscalio de La Nacion-Segunda Fiscalia Suprema Especializada en (MP-FN-SFSP-FEA)
    Ministerio de Transportes y Comunicaciones-direccion Aeronautica Civil- Direccion Di (MTC-DGAC-TID)
    Marina de Guerra del Peru-Direccion de Capitania de Puertos-Ofinina de Coordinacion (NAVY_DICAPI)
    PNP-Direccion de Instruccion Escuela Tecnico Superior (PNP-DINST-ETS)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Centro Operative Polical (PNP- DIRANDRO-CEOPOL)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogaqs-Destacamento Antidrogas (PNP-DIRANDRO –DAD)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Departmento de Operacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DEPOTAD)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-direccion Nacional Antidrogas Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ-DIE)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division of Investigacion Fim (PNP-DIRANDRO-DINFI)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Direccion (PNP- DIRANDRO-DIRECCION)
    Pollicia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID)
    Policia Nacional del Peru-Dieeccion Nacional Antidragas-Division de Investigation (PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID-AIR)
    Police Nacional del Peru Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID-DIE)
    PNP Dirandro Division de Operaciones Especialses Antidrogas (PNP- DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD)
    PNP-Dirandro Division de Operaciones Especiales Antidrogas-Departmento de operations (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES1)
    PNP-Dirandro-Division de Operaciones Especiales Antidrogas-Departmento de Operations (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES2)
    PNP-Dirandro-Division de Operaciones Especiales Antidrogas-Departmento de Operations (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES3)
    PNP-Dirandro Divoed-Departmento de Operaciones Especiales –Control de Insumos (PNP/DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES-CIQPF)
    PNP-Dirandro Division de Operaciones Especiales Androgas-Unidad Canina (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-K9)
    PMP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Division de Operaciones Tacticas Antidrogas (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD)
    PNP-Direccion Antidrogas-Equipo Inteligencia (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD- EQUINT)
    PNP-Dirrecion Nacional Antidrogas Division de Prevencion del Trafico Ilicito del Drug (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVITID)
    PNP-Dirandro Division de Prevencion del /trafico Ilicito de Drogas Proyeccion Social (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVPTID-PROY.SOCIAL)
    PNP-Dirreccion Nacional Antidrogas-Escuela de Investicion del Trafico Ilicito de (PNP-DIRANDRO-ESINTID)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-estado Mayor (PNP-DIRANDRO- ESTADO-MAYOR)
    PNP-Direnado-Jefature de Estado Mayor (PNP-DIRANDRO-JEM) PNP-Dirandro-Oficina de Administration (PNP-DIRANDRO-OFAD) PNP-Dirandro-Oficina Administrativa-Unidad de Recursos Humanos PNP-Direccion de Operaciones Antidrogas Oficina de Analysis Especial (PNP- DIRANDRO-OFANESP)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Oficina de Criminalistica (PNP/DIRANDRO-OFCRI)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Oficina de Inteligencia (PNP-DIRANDRO of INT)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Departmento de Opeeraciones TacticasAntidrogas (PNP-DIREADRO-OFINT-RIG)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Ofina de Inteligencia-Unidad de contrainteligent (PNP-DIRANDRO-OFINT-UNICOUNT)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Odicina de Telematica (PNP- DIRANDRO-OFITEL)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Secretaria (PNP-DIRANDRO SECRETARIA)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Telematica (PNP-DIRANDRO TELEMATICA)
    PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Unidad de Informacion (PNP- DIRANDRO-UNINFO-RR-PP)
    PNP-Direccion Antigragas Unidad de Planeamiento Operative (PNP-DIRANDRO UPO)
    PNP-Direccion de Aviacion Policial (PNP-DIRAVPOL)
    PNP-Direccion Ejectiva de Operaciones Policials (PNP-DIREOP)
    PNP Direccion General Tribunal Adminitrativo Disciplinary Nacional (PNP-DIRGEN-TRIADN)
    PNP-Direccion de Investigacion Criminalistica y Apoyo a la Justicia (PNP-DIRINCRI)
    PNP-Direccion de Inteligencia (PNP-DIRINT)
    PNP-Direccion de Seguridad Publica-Division de Operacciones Especiales (PNP-DIRSEPUB)
    PNP-Direccion de Turismo y Ecologia Division de Policia Ecologica (PNP- DITUEC-DIVPOECA)
    PNP-Division Antidragas (PNP-DIVANDRO)
    PNP-Division Antidragas Departmento Caning Political (PNP-DIVANDRO- DEPCAPOL)
    PNP-Direccion Frente Policial Huallaa Oficina de Inteligencia Provincial (PNP FPH-OFINPRO)
    PNP-Direccion Frente Policial Huallaga-Oficina de Inteligencia Provincial (PNP-FPH-OFINPRO)
    Xi Direccion Territorial de Policial Ayacucho (PNP-IX-DIRTEPOL)
    PNP-Seguridad del Estado Departmento de Extranjeria Aijch (PNP-SE-DEPEXT)
    PNP-V Region Policial Direccion General (PNP-V-REGION DIRECCION)
    PNP-V Region Policial Unidad de Inteliencia (PNP-V REGION INTELLIGENCIA PRISMA)
    Minisgerio de la Produccion Direccion de Insumos y Productos Quimicos Fiscaizados Proyecto luli (PRODUCE PROYECTO LULU)
    Servicios Urbanos y Mujeres de Bajos Ingresos (SUMBI)
    Unidad de Ingelobencia Financiera (UIF)

    Receipt
    Items authorized by Project Advisers for donation are issued to counterparts with a computerized document of issue detailing description, model, make, serial number, EUM bar code number, etc. and followed up with a letter of donation presented to the commander/director of the unit/section stating the terms to include a recall if the item is found not to be used as indicated. The NAS has included a statement in its donation letters clarifying that if no acceptance of donation response is received within 30 days of the letter, NAS will consider the donation as accepted. This was required due to some counterparts delaying acceptance and official transfers to them thus compelling the NAS to cover vehicle insurance and other owner related expenses.

    Monitoring Procedures

    On-Site Inspections
    There were 87 scheduled inspections during 2008 of 4,925 items. The percentage of donated items was 33%. The balance was inspected in 2007. Unscheduled inspections are practically impossible as coordination for access to bases, warehouses and offices are normally granted by commanders/directors upon receipt of a written request.

    SUNAT-ADUANAS-AERA 32
    SUNAT-ADUANAS-MARTIMA 141
    SUNAT-ADUANAS-POSTAL 9
    CEDRO 32
    CEPTIS 5
    CORAH 357
    CORAH-CADA 35
    CORPAC 5
    CRESAR 1
    DEVIDA 12
    FAP 5
    HNAS ADORATRICES 1
    ICT 187
    KALLPA 3
    MP-FN-SFSP-FEA 90
    MTC-DGAC-TID 137
    NAVY-DICAPI 27
    PNP-DINST-ETS 2
    PNP-DIRANDRO-ASJUR 1
    PNP-DIANDRO-DEPOTAD 137
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ 16
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ-DIE 2
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DIRECCION 5
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID 11
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID-SERPOST 1
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVEAD 2
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES1 4
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES2 1
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES-CIQPF 2
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD 69
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVPTID 1
    PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVPTID-PROY.SOCIAL 2
    PNP-DIRANDRO-ESINTID 3
    PNP-DIRANDRO-JEM 13
    PNP-DIRANDRO-OFAD 25
    PNP-DIRANDRO-OFAD-UNIREHUM 1
    PNP-DIRANDRO-OFCRI 9
    PNP-DIRANDRO-OFINT 35
    PNP-DIRQANDRO-OFINT-UNICOINT 2
    PNP-DIRANDRO-OFITEL 6
    PNP-DIRANDRO-SECRETARIA 1
    PNP-DIRANDRO-UNINFO-RR-PP 1
    PNP-DIRAVPOL 35
    PNP-DIRGEN-TRIADN 3
    PNP-DITID-DEPCAPOL 1
    PNP-DIRANDRO 12
    PNP-SE-DEPEXT 2
    PRODUCE 8
    SUMBI 1
    TOTAL ITEMS 1633
    TOTAL SITES 87

    Secondary Method of Monitoring Resource Status

    The NAS requests annual inventories from all counterparts in possession of commodities donated under the bilateral agreement. Counterparts normally comply.

    In some cases involving extremely small and remote sites with just a few items, NAS Logistics communicates with the counterpart and without stating the serial number requests that they confirm an item and give NAS the correct serial number on specific pieces of equipment. When the counterpart responds with the correct number, it would indicate that the piece of equipment is at that location. The NAS will then request operational status. If the counterpart does not respond with the proper serial number, NAS Logistics conducts follow up questioning.

    Status-Commodities

    Canine Program
    Thirteen (13) dogs were provided to the DNCD in 2005. Four are in Punta Cana; five in La Romana; four in Santo Domingo. They are used for explosives detection. Twelve are in good health; one dog in Punta Cana is ill and will soon be retired.

    Computer Equipment
    The NAS continues to donate computer systems to Peruvian counterpart institutions for use in counternarcotics and data keeping. These systems are located at Forward Operating Locations (FOL's) and maintained by the NAS IT section. As the units become obsolete, they are upgraded or replaced with new units. Computer systems have been donated to NGO"s with the majority located in Lima. Maintenance for the systems remains the sole responsibility of the counterpart.

    Communications Equipment
    Additional base stations and hand-held radios were donated to the Peruvian Police and CORAH to improve coordination and communications for interdiction and eradication. These items are maintained by the counterpart with oversight from the NAS and monitored during EUM inspections.

    Surveillance Equipment
    The NAS Port program donated a computerized surveillance system to augment an existing system at the sea port in Callao. The existing system had several serious blind spots which make it possible for Port personnel to manipulate cargo in shipping containers after they had been inspected. During installation of the additional system, the NAS IT encountered considerable interference and delay by Port authorities which were finally overcome and the project was compeleted. Although the NAS IT has spent a considerable amount of time training SUNAT personnel to monitor and record events at the Port, consistent results continue to be hampered.

    Vehicles
    NAS Peru donated a total of 43 vehicles during 2008, 33 of which are motorcycles. The major of these vehicles were donated to the Peruvian Police Drug Units. The units have responsibility for maintenance. The NAS occasionally funds and oversees some repairs and maintenance due to lack of funding on the behalf of the GOP.

    CORAH

    Truck
    16
    Pickup
    13
    Motorcycle
    3
    Van
    2
    sedan
    2

    ADUANAS MARITIMA
    Vans
    3
    Sedan
    1

    CORAH-CADAS
    Pickup
    12

    CORPAC
    Aircraft tractor
    2

    Vessels
    The NAS did not donate any vessels in 2008. The vessels donated in prior years are maintained by the Peruvian Coast Guard. Many of the smaller craft are presently inoperative due to lack of funds.

    AVY-DICAPI
    Survival raft 6 Boston Whaler 3
    22-foot Simai 2
    Motorcycle 1

    DIRANDRO-DEPOTAD
    Aluminum boat 4 Zodiac 3
    22-foot Simai 2
    2 1⁄2 lb wooden boat 1
    Aluminum boat

    DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD
    7

    Weapons
    All weapons are closely monitored by NAS personnel during routine inspections. They are distributed in various locations throughout the country, mostly on Peruvian Police bases.

    NAVY-DICAPI
    M-60 rifle 80

    DIRANDRO-DAD
    M-60 rifle 14

    DIRANDRO-DEPOTAD
    5.56 45 mm rifle 98
    M-60 rifle 48

    DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES2
    5.56 45 mm rifle 19
    M-60 rifle 4

    DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES3
    M-60 rifle 4

    DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES-CI
    M-60 rifle 1

    DIVOTAD
    5.56 45 mm rifle 10 M-60 rifle 27

    DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD
    5.56 45 mm rifle M-60 rifle
    5.56 45 mm rifle M-60 rifle

    DIRANDRO-OFAD
    5.56 45 mm rifle 5
    M-60 rifle 2

    DIRAVPOL
    Armament Systems
    15
    M-60 rifle
    45

    Aircraft
    The four C-26 Aircraft donated to the Peruvian Air Force and supported by NAS Aviation assisted GOP and CN/CT operations. NAS Aviation installed a forward Looking Inferred (FLIR) digital camera from one C-26 to the other as needed for operations. It is used for reconnaissance and identifying clandestine runways and drug production activities. The C-26's are also used in support of Joint Armed Forces Command and Peruvian Police Command. They are also used for transporting Peruvian CN police units.

    The total number of A-37's the FAP has in the inventory is 23. Of these, six are static displays at different locations. Of the remaining 17, only four to six are operational (the number fluctuates). The remaining aircraft are in various states of disrepair. At one time, they had 40 but over the years, 14 have been lost in accidents and three have disappeared. The A-37 has three missions: counterdrug, primary interceptor and advance fighter tactics training for fighter pilots.

    Peruvian Air Force
    C-26
    2
    A-37
    23

    X-Ray Units
    Several sophisticated X-ray units, mobile and stationary, including body scanners have been donated to Customs for use at the principal airports and sea ports of Peru. They are used to scan air cargo and passengers along with shipping containers. They are maintained by a contract with the vendor's local representative. Cooperation between Customs and DIRANDRO (Peruvian Drug Police) has caused delays this year.

    Status-Services

    Demand Reduction Services
    Combating TIP- NAS Lima engages with both the NGO sector, multi-national organizations, the police and various Peruvian government agencies to train police, prosecutors, and judges to recognize TIP cases; make the appropriate changes; provide victim assistance; enforce existing TIP laws; and raise general public awareness.

    Public Awareness Campaign on Drug Consumption
    The campaign engages and educates children, parents, policy makers and the general public on the growing use of and availability of illegal drugs not just in the schools, but in the neighborhoods and on the streets.

    Anti-Drug Community Coalitions
    The coalition creates grass roots neighborhood organizations with representatives from different sectors of the community to identify community level problems; engage the police; and work together towards creative solutions.

    Media/Monitoring Services
    The services include the monitoring of pro-narcotics trafficking messaging east of the Andes and the daily monitoring of all radio and television news outlets broadcasting in controlled areas of the country.
    The services provide an alternative voice-radio and internet news service and comprehensive reporting for the narco-controlled areas east of the Andes as a counter voice to the pro-cocalero, pro-narcotrafficker, anti-alternative development messages that predominate the airways in these regions.
    The academic voice-supports academic research and discussion of the issue of narcotics and narcotic trafficking in Peru so as to fuel the policy debate.

    Program Impact

    NAS Aviation Commodities/Service
    The donation of miscellaneous equipment by NAS Aviation improved eradication and CN interdiction operations in Santa Lucia, Tingo Maria and Palma Palmpa.

    In 2008, these aircraft equipped as such and in coordination with the Peruvian National Police (PNP) ground units, captured two drug aircraft in Puerto Maldonado area.

    CORAH Commodities/Services

    INL Project funds provided through NAS Lima are the sole source of funding for CORAH and CADA in support of their mission (coca eradication and monitoring). INL through NAS Lima partially funds the Instituto de Cultivos Tropicales (ICT) in support of the activities.

    CORAH conducted a total of 301 eradication mission during 2008, eradicating 10,143 hectares which exceeded the projected goal of 108,000 hectares.

    The majority of commodities purchased included satellite imagery, survey equipment, communications, computer equipment and field gear. These commodities permitted CORAH and CADA to perform the functions required to conduct eradication in a programmed manner. These functions include identification of coca growing areas, quantification of coca under cultivation, physical eradication of coca in the field, reporting and verification.

    ICT Commodities/Services
    ICT worked in 250 locations in Huanuco and San Martin Provinces. ICT conducted 250 educational events mostly related to cacao and coffee cultivation methods to increase production. In addition, ICT hosted an international congress related to soils. ICT provided technical assistance to plant 562 hectares of cacao and rehabilitated 286. They were an integral part of the creation of an agricultural cooperative dedicated to cacao commercialization. This cooperative has 885 members and their goal is 1,500. Major commodity purchases with NAS provided funding was very limited in 2008. These purchases include photo and video equipment and computer equipment.

    DEA- Commodities-Services
    A large variety of equipment is provided to the PNP SIU through the DEA Lima Country Office SIU program. Items include, but are not limited to, computers, printers, vehicles, electronics, cameras, etc. The PNP SIU program benefits greatly from the use of such equipment which enables the police unit to maximize efficiently in all aspects of its administration and investigations, including evidence gathering, analysis, enforcement operations, and prosecutions.

    Problems and Corrective Action Plan

    Repair and Maintenance of Commodities
    On occasion, donated vehicles do not receive proper maintenance due to lack of counterpart funding. The NAS is obligated to cover repairs and maintenance to keep the vehicles operative. This only applies to special cases approved by the individual Project Adviser.

    The FAP has a Foreign Military Sales case open to repair J-85 engines. Twelve engines will be overhauled resulting in an additional four or five A-37's becoming operational. The MAAG is actively engaged with the FAP to restore their A-37 fleet.

    Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities
    Two body scans originally received in country in February 2008 and donated to Customs for use at airports have not yet been installed. One unit, destined for Tacna is not in use and the counterpart has not prepared the facilities. The other unit designated for Cuzco was originally delayed due to a factory problem. After technicians from Germany repaired the unit, the delay continued due to major changes in counterpart management. NAS Porta/Maritine program is working the issue and may consider recalling the unit for Cuzco and donating it to the police.

    In Tarapoto, four (4) Prosecutor's Offices have copy machines that were not being used at the time of inspection due to lack of funds for toner. This lack of use has been communicated to the Program Adviser.

    The Hauncayo and Piura Prosecutors Offices also have copy machines that were not being used at the time of inspection due to lack of funds for toner. This lack of use has been communicated to the Program Adviser.

    Reporting of Donated Materials.
    Accurate reporting of many donated materials has been a problem due to several projects having their own Logistics Section, warehouses, procedures and forms and are not responsible for reporting to NAS Logistics.

    Being principally responsible for accurate tracking of EUM materials, NAS Management has directed that all logistics operations report directly to NAS Logistics to standardize forms and procedures thus reducing over-all costs and improve reporting, accuracy and security of material. Standardization assures that all the required information is properly reported to a central unit."
  • According to the Department of State 2009 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report, International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement will fund the following activities in Peru:
    "U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs Policy Initiatives. U.S. assistance to Peru focuses on strengthening governance and creating opportunities for legal activities in isolated areas where drug traffickers and terrorists operate, using aggressive eradication, interdiction, and control of precursor chemicals; coupled with alternative development to reduce dependence on illicit coca cultivation. The USG also provides support for GOP efforts to improve its counter-terrorism efforts and publicize the links between drug production and common crime; so that Peruvians understand that drug trafficking degrades the quality of their lives, damages the environment, and threatens economic development. Bilateral Cooperation. In 2009, the USG continued to work with the GOP on counternarcotics operations in the major drug source zones of the UHV and the VRAE. The PNP received USG assistance to increase police presence and improve police operational capabilities in these areas by supporting and renewing existing police bases and enhancing police training. Other U.S. government-provided training included maritime law enforcement and container inspection. With U.S. support, DIRANDRO commanders and field personnel received specialized counternarcotics courses and refresher courses in advanced airport drug interdiction and chemical field testing. The USCG provided mobile training to Peruvian officials in the areas of port security and container inspection. Law enforcement officials from other Andean countries also participated in the training courses, which contributes to regional cooperation in drug investigations and interdiction. Peru's law enforcement organizations conducted joint operations with neighboring countries and Europe, and participated in drug enforcement strategy conferences to address drug trafficking along its borders, such as the former Operation Seis Fronteras?now renamed Operation Sin Fronteras to show that chemical and drug trafficking have no borders. This multilateral initiative is conducted at various stages during the year to combat the diversion of controlled chemicals to illicit markets where these chemicals are utilized. Peru hosted the Operation Sin Fronteras Phase XI evaluation conference in September 2009. The Cooperating Nation Information Exchange System (CNIES) Agreement signed in 2005 between the USG and the GOP enables the USG and other cooperating nations to share intelligence concerning trafficking of drugs by air. CNIES has been implemented at Peruvian Air Force (FAP) locations in Lima, Pucallpa, and Iquitos. Since 2005, the FAP Joint Anti-Drug C-26 Air Squadron has conducted counternarcotics reconnaissance and airlift east of the Andes. The C-26 Forward Looking INFRA-RED (FLIR) was used in 2009 to map suspected clandestine runways in Peru and update the status of known airstrips. The FAP C-26s provided critical overhead real time coverage for eradication workers, eradication police, and army personnel in the field. The planned 2010 installation in the C-26 of an electric optical camera will provide high quality imagery of coca fields to aid in planning eradication operations. The Military Assistance and Advisory Group (MAAG) coordinated and conducted CNIES training for FAP personnel and shifted radar assets in response to intelligence indicating potential trafficking by air. FAP conducted joint training exercises with Brazil and Colombia."
  • The U.S. Department of State 2010 Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Program and Budget Guide, Fiscal Year 2010 says this about International Narcotics Control Economic Aid aid to Peru:
    "FY 2010 Program

    Public Relations & Media

    Public opinion has changed perceptions about coca cultivation and the complicity of coca growers in drug trafficking, particularly when studies show that 90 percent of the coca leaf grown in Peru is converted into narcotics. In Peru’s major cities the public is most concerned about the impact of drug trafficking on, and the effect of, drug abuse among youth. FY 2010 funds will support a campaign undertaken by NGO partners to better inform the Peruvian public of the dangers confronting the country from the illegal drug trade, including related crime, corruption and increased local drug use. This initiative is especially important to oppose narcotics trafficker-financed campaigns that characterize coca as the ""sacred leaf"" and producers as ""poor farmers.""

    Administration of Justice

    FY 2010 funding will help GOP prosecutors assigned to oversee police and military drug enforcement operations, interrogate suspects and witnesses, secure evidence, supervise the destruction of illegal facilities such as laboratories or airstrips, and prepare cases for trial by 331 Western Hemisphere providing training, and some travel expenses. Prosecutors are also required to accompany eradication teams in confrontational areas to serve as impartial witnesses to ensure that rights are not being violated and to defuse protests. Additionally, FY 2010 funds will support advanced training for prosecutors already in the program and entry-level training for new prosecutors. Funding will allow selected jurisdictions with inadequate resources to learn to better manage heavy narcotics caseloads by providing technical assistance and training.

    Demand Reduction

    The demand reduction program has moved away from the more traditional programs that focused on educational workshops, epidemiological research, treatment, and the training of teachers and health professionals. In FY 2010 we will use the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions (CAC) model will be utilized, which has been very successful in the U.S. and are adapting it in Peru. There are currently twelve CACs in nine municipalities. Already more than 50 percent of the cost for CAC activities comes from local sources. Support from local stakeholders is positively impacting drug-related municipal policies and norms. U.S. funds will be used to purchase promotional materials and publications used in CAC campaigns, to train community based facilitators in the CAC model, and to sponsor public events designed to publicize CAC activities.

    Money Laundering

    FY 2010 funds will support advanced training and technical assistance by the U.S. Dept. of Treasury Office of Technical Assistance (OTA) and United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC) on money laundering, asset forfeiture and bulk cash smuggling problems in Peru and the GOP’s ability to address it. Based on this assessment, the OTA will offer a series of seminars and training for financial analysts, police, prosecutors and judges in the area of detecting and prosecuting illegal activity ties to money laundering. Funds will also pay for a series of seminars and training programs for Peruvian judges in all aspects of investigating and prosecuting money laundering crimes organized by OAS/CICAD."
  • According to the U.S. Department of State 2010 Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Program and Budget Guide, Fiscal Year 2010, International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement will fund the following activities in Peru:
    "Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

    Assist the Government of Peru (GOP) to institutionalize policy-making and coordination and take over management of certain counternarcotics programs. Indicators include:

    • The maintenance and operation of Peruvian National Police (PNP) air wing is performed by Peruvian nationals, with an USG contractor providing oversight on maintenance, training, and operation of equipment and helicopters.


    Improve coordination and capabilities of Peruvian agencies involved in counternarcotics law enforcement to more effectively act against illicit drug trafficking:

    • Graduate 900 new counternarcotics police annually to expand the presence and capability of the Peruvian national counternarcotics anti-drug police (DIRANDRO) for enforcement and security tied to counter narcotics efforts.


    • Maintain a comprehensive maritime and port interdiction program to diminish substantially the exploitation of Peru's northern ports by drug traffickers through an increase of seizures and inclusion of the National Cargo Manifest Review Unit.


    • Establish and employ reciprocal maritime operational procedures with the USG to expedite communications and decisive interdiction action between USG and GOP maritime operations centers.


    • Program Justification

      Peru is the second largest cocaine producing country in the world and a major exporter of cocaine and cocaine base to markets in South America, Mexico, the United States, and Europe. USG financial support for the GOP's 2007-2011 National Strategy against Drug Trafficking supports Peru's democracy and economic growth and is a key U.S. national interest. Given its strategic ""swing-state"" position, as an essential player in preserving peace and security in the Andean region, Peru's success has a clear positive multiplier effect throughout the region.

      The transnational nature of the narcotics-trafficking threat, along with the challenge of mounting a coordinated response in the Andean region, combined with a lack of state presence in remote areas with significant coca cultivation underscore the challenge. In this context, incrementally expanding coca cultivation after a decade of sharp declines, the rising incidence of narcotics-related violence including from remnants of the Sendero Luminoso (SL; Shining Path) terrorist group, and evidence that Mexican trafficking groups are increasingly involved in Peru's cocaine trade all highlight the need for continued U.S. counternarcotics assistance.

      Program Accomplishments

      Peru's National Drug Plan for 2007-2011 emphasizes the nexus between interdiction, eradication, alternative development, and prevention. An area of the Huallaga Valley historically notorious for drugs and the SL insurgency is now being referred to in media reports as ""The Tocache Miracle"" or ""The San Martin Success Story."" A recent analysis by the Institute for International Studies of Catholic University in Peru (IDEI) of the economy of the region around San Martin confirms that a substantial diminution of coca production reduced coca's impact to the regional economy from a high of 17.4 percent in 1992, to 1.9 percent in 2006, and by 2008, to an ""insignificant"" level. This decrease can be directly linked to the success of eradication programs working in tandem with alternative development where aid and assistance following eradication included infrastructure improvements for roads, potable water supply, and schools, and the introduction of crops such as African Palm Oil, cacao, coffee, bananas; offering viable and legal alternatives for farmers.

      In 2008 U.S. assistance supported the GOP's efforts to disrupt production and transshipment of cocaine via operations on land, sea, and air; seizing 28 metric tons (MT) of cocaine. Manual eradication of 10,143 hectares of coca helped tamp down the impact of illicit coca cultivation. With the support of U.S. backed initiatives, the GOP investigated and dismantled major drug trafficking organizations, and shut down drug-processing sites in coca-growing areas. The Peruvian National Police (PNP) Directorate of Antinarcotics Agency -- DIRANDRO destroyed 1,225 cocaine-production laboratories, including 19 cocaine HCl and 1,206 base laboratories; and 2,119 MT of dry and macerated coca leaf.

      Police capacity east of the Andes continued to expand with 935 new police officers making 3-year commitments to serve in counternarcotics units such that approximately 2,000 anti- drug police were operating in coca source zones by the end of the year.

      Backed by U.S. program support, Peruvian agencies involved in maritime and airport counter-drug enforcement accounted for seizures nationwide of approximately 13 metric tons of cocaine and Peruvian Customs (SUNAT) personnel examined an average of 9,500 containers per month nationwide, compared to 3-4 per month less than two years ago. USG- provided training in non-intrusive inspection (NII) technology enabled SUNAT to inspect more than 116,000 export seagoing containers in 2008. Use of NII technology expanded to the southern frontier city of Tacna, with the deployment of a Body Scanner for screening suspect ""mules"" crossing into Chile. Additionally SUNAT concentrated efforts to interdict illicit money transported through the international airport and domestic flights, resulting in the seizure of nearly one million dollars.

      FY 2010 Program

      Eradication

      Eradication is a resource-intensive objective as it requires high operational costs taking teams to remote coca growing areas for labor-intensive manual eradication protected by a significant security presence to counter lethal threats from narcotics traffickers and producers.

      Coca and Opium Poppy Eradication: In FY 2010, coca eradication efforts will continue in the Upper Huallaga Valley (UHV) with the intent to initiate similar operations in the Monzon as the activities move to the southern Huallaga Valley. Additionally, eradication operations anticipate entering several difficult areas such as Polvora-Pizana and northern Huanuco. This activity will support creation of a coca free corridor that will extend from Northern San Martin, through the Upper Huallaga Valley and northern Huanuco along the Fernando 329 Western Hemisphere

      Belaunde Terry Highway. This corridor will, in turn, connect with the Federico Basadre Highway through Aguaytia leading to Pucallpa. The USG will provide operational support for the labor intensive manual eradication program, including transport, food, salary supplements, field gear and tools, tents, first aid, and training for the eradicators.

      Crop Research & Extension (ICT): A joint USG-Organization of American States Anti-Drug Office (OAS/CICAD) Alternative Crop Research and Extension (ICT) project provides a research arm for Embassy Lima's Narcotics Affairs Section (NAS). This project will continue to help refine the Embassy Lima Cocaine Production Averted Formula, assist in determining the best methodology to measure coca plant density, perform field research into coffee and cacao diseases with a focus on finding ways to increase production yields, and disseminate practical research results to farmers practicing alternative development throughout the region. ICT is crucial to the efforts to expand the eradication program into the Monzon. ICT will continue its efforts to implement a five-year strategic plan containing a strong marketing component with a goal of self-sufficiency for ICT by the end of calendar year 2010.

      Aviation Support (eradication): Aviation support for eradication funds provides operating and maintenance costs for the National Police Aviation Division (DIRAVPOL) which includes airlift for eradication, and logistical support for the Coca Monitoring and Reduction Agency (CORAH). Funding supports pilots, aircrews, and support personnel for 23 USG- owned Huey II helicopters, four fixed-wing aircraft (including two C-26s which are used for counternarcotics missions), and limited operational support for Peruvian MI-17 helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft -- all of which support the coca eradication and security forces working east of the Andes. Funding also supports fuel, maintenance, hangars and warehousing, aircraft rental when needed, and operational support for DIRAVPOL personnel.

      Crop Monitoring and Research: A branch of the GOP's CORAH called the Corps for Assistance to Alternative Development (CADA) monitors and maps coca and poppy cultivation and provides a means to verify the extent of coca eradication within communities, which is also a critical condition for continued alternative development success. In FY 2010, INL will provide technical support to CADA for the development of a business plan to market CADA services so it can become self sustaining. Demand for CADA expertise has been high, and information is shared with the USG, GOP, and international organizations to guide counternarcotics efforts. CADA is collaborating with the police, the UN and GOP to develop a methodology to detect and map opium poppy capable of overcoming terrain and weather obstacles. USG funding will provide maps, salary supplements, per diem, travel costs, vehicles, and training.

      Interdiction

      Law Enforcement Support: FY 2010 funding will provide operational support such as vehicles, radios, field gear for interdiction deployments, security for eradication operations, as well as training and field exercises to enhance the capabilities of the Peruvian National Police Narcotics Directorate (DIRANDRO). The goal is to drive down coca leaf prices by disrupting the market as well as to interdict drugs and chemicals. Support for enhanced law enforcement efforts in the Eastern Andes will include some minor renovations and refurbishment of existing infrastructure to house graduating officers from the U.S. supported Basic Police Academies. Support for pre-academies includes teacher's salaries, textbooks, uniforms, computers, updated communications equipment, field gear, emergency/safety reaction gear, travel costs, communications support, to the drug detector canine unit, as well as to the special operations and eradication security forces.

      Port Security: Peru has achieved significant success in detecting drug shipments in Pacific ports and the Lima airport. This program will continue to improve the Government of Peru's capacity to examine cargo and passengers through facilities improvements, equipment acquisitions, training, operational planning and execution. Emphasis will be placed on the renovation and development of additional Manifest Review Units (MRUs) based on the U.S.- sponsored model MRU, which has been established at Callao, Peru's largest seaport.

      Peruvian Customs: The Peruvian Customs Service inspects arriving and departing passengers and cargo at Lima's air and maritime terminals, at other air and maritime ports of entry, and at land border checkpoints. The Customs Service's drug enforcement section is responsible for narcotics interdiction at national airports and seaports. FY 2010 support includes procurement of computers and ion scan machines that will enable this section, in concert with DIRANDRO, to bolster inspection and enforcement operations at the country's principal airport and seaport, as well as at other smaller installations.

      Aviation Support (interdiction): Aviation support for narcotics law enforcement provides operating and maintenance costs for the National Police Aviation Division (DIRAVPOL), which is responsible for airlift for interdiction, and logistical support to counternarcotics. This program supports pilots, aircrews, and support personnel for 23 USG-owned UH-2 helicopters, four fixed-wing aircraft (including two C-26s which are used for counternarcotics missions), and limited operational support for Peruvian MI-17 helicopters, and fixed-wing aircraft -- all of which support coca eradication and other law enforcement activities east of the Andes. Funding also supports fuel, maintenance, hangars, warehousing, aircraft rental when needed, and operational support for DIRAVPOL personnel."
    • According to the U.S. Department of State 2007 2007 End-Use Monitoring Report, International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "Procedures

      Inventory Management

      NAS Logistics is an eleven person logistics section headed by an American U.S. hired Personal Services Contract (PSC) employee as Logistics Management Advisor, who manages warehouse facilities in Pucallpa and the Embassy facilities on the Peruvian Air Force Base located at the Lima International. The latter houses 25 to 30 NAS, DEA and contractor personnel. NAS Logistics has extensive security controls in place at both locations. The NAS Logistics Section is charged with Customs clearances; shipping/receiving of all NAS commodities; preparing donation letters; maintaining inventories; and coordinating EUM spot-checks and drafting the annual End Use Monitoring report.

      The Logistics database contains detailed information on commodities and End Use Monitoring inspection visits and can be sorted by location to facilitate End Use Monitoring spot-checks.

      In 2007, NAS Logistics cleared and processed through Customs about 400 shipments valued at over $15.3 million of which 93 percent of these shipments cleared Customs within 24 hours of arrival in country. Additionally, NAS Logistics received and processed approximately 300 local purchase shipments and shipped from Lima some 400 tons of materials to Forward Operating Bases (FOBs) and Forward Operating Locations (FOLs). From the Pucallpa site, NAS Logistics shipped 278 tons to FOL's and Lima via truck and air transport, which doubles the 139 tons shipped last year.

      The NAS staff performs regular and unannounced End Use Monitoring inspections throughout the year. Participants include Project Advisors and supervisors of all NAS programs. Aviation assets are inspected by NAS Logistics and 9 U.S. hired American Personal Services Contractors (Field Advisor Security Specialists). One US PSC Ports and Maritime Advisor and one Locally Engaged Staff (LES) share responsibility for EUM of Maritime assets with the NAS Logistics Section. Two Eradication Advisors and a Program Analyst monitor commodities and assets donated to CORAH (Coca Reduction Project), its subdivision, CADA (Coca Measurement Corps), and the Institute of Tropical Crops (Instituto de Cultivos Tropicales- ICT). ICT is a Non-Government Organization (NGO) dedicated to improving crops that may be substituted for coca. MAAG personnel visit military installations to perform spot checks on Defense Articles provided to the Peruvian Armed Forces and Drug Police under security assistance programs for counternarcotics purposes. DEA special agents assist in monitoring equipment, materials and consumables provided to the Peruvian National Police (PNP).

      On-Site Inspections

      During 2007, NAS Logistics visited 68 counterpart organizations at a total of 132 sites in 26 different cities and conducted inspections of 3,985 donated items out of a total of 5,028 items subject to inspection, resulting in about 80 percent of donated items being verified. Of the remaining 20 percent (1043 items), about 500 had been inspected in 2006. The NAS visited all sites containing large concentrations of equipment and targeted any site where discrepancies had been noted in the past. Inspection results were compared to existing NAS inventories to produce a computerized list of discrepancies. These discrepancies were reported to the appropriate NAS program advisor and counterparts for appropriate action. NAS Logistics also assists the MAAG and DEA with donations to counternarcotics units and the tracking of the same.

      After each EUM inspection, NAS Logistics submits a final report to the program advisors for follow-up action to locate any shortages and/or to correct errors. Throughout the year, NAS Logistics also tasked Peruvian counterparts with submitting up-to-date inventories, including the location and condition of all donated commodities. Some counterparts maintain vehicles and equipment in their inventories that have outlived their useful life span. The NAS routinely encourages counterparts of established guidelines for replacement of equipment. CORAH is attempting to hold an auction to dispose of unserviceable equipment. However, this auction is being delayed by bureaucracy within the Minister of Interior. Most Peruvian governmental and other counterparts submitted detailed inventories. The submissions are compared to existing records. The results of physical inspections are used to update the NAS database.

      The Embassy's Management Section is responsible for the physical inventory of non-project (NAS) property maintained on the Embassy's NEPA system. A NAS Administrative Assistant oversees non-project, non-expendable property at the Embassy location. NAS Logistics is responsible for the inventory of NAS personal property at FOLs and FOBs. In 2007, NAS Logistics reconciled property book inventories of 5,676 NAS program items out of a total of 7,696 items located nationwide.

      Status

      All commodities are used full-time in the conduct of counternarcotics activities, including construction and logistical support. While conducting End Use Monitoring inspections of counterpart sites, NAS Logistics found no evidence of improper use of donated materials. In addition, the cooperation of counterparts as a whole was satisfactory.

      Vehicles

      NAS Logistics maintains an inventory and tracks a total of over of 800 vehicles in 33 cities nationwide. Seven hundred and seventeen vehicles have been donated over the years to 23 counterpart organizations and include sedans, pickups, SUV's and motorcycles. Included in the total figure of 800, 86 are NAS program vehicles, i.e., fuel trucks, forklifts, cargo trucks, sedans, pickups, SUV's etc. The vast majority of donated vehicles are provided to various elements of the central and regional Drug Police (DINANDRO and DIVANDRO), the Aviation Police (DIRAVPOL), the Coca Reduction Project of the Upper Huallaga (CORAH), its sub-division, the Coca Measurement and Eradication Verification Corps (CADA). CORAH/CADA has 64 vehicles and 29 motorcycles in their inventory. Six (6) vehicles are totally inoperable. The Instituto de Cultivos Tropicales (ICT) was funded previously under CADA but is now funded with its own budget. Besides NAS-provided vehicles, ICT has acquired a vehicle and several motorcycles through a coca yield study (BREAKTHROUGH) funded by DEA. ICT has a total of four vehicles and 20 motorcycles. Eleven motorcycles are beyond their useful lifespan; however, eight are still operational and three are not. The latter will be disposed of by auction. The Ministry of Education, the Judicial Prosecutors, the PNP/DIRANDRO Chemical Control Group, and the Peruvian Customs Service also possess NAS-donated vehicles.

      The NAS employs a FSN motor vehicle maintenance supervisor within the Logistics Section, who is responsible for tracking NAS project vehicles, maintaining stocks of essential spare parts, and providing preventive maintenance oversight at repair shops which are handled with Blanket Purchase Agreements (BPA's) whenever possible. Aviation personnel have overall responsibility for all aircraft, tugs, fuel trucks, fire trucks, and forklifts, including preventive maintenance.

      The NAS requires counterparts to provide proof of preventive maintenance whenever they request NAS financial assistance for major repairs to vehicles purchased with project funds. Funding is not provided if the preventive maintenance has not been performed.

      In 2007, NAS Logistics disposed of one excess/obsolete program vehicle in the Embassy auction and funds are to be returned to the NAS. In addition, two used program vehicles were donated to counterparts, one of them being a fork lift to the Peruvian Air Police (DIRAVPOL) and the other a laboratory van to Peruvian Customs (SUNAT). The NAS also donated a total of five new vehicles to counterparts during 2007. Presently, there are about 20 inoperative/obsolete counterpart vehicles being prepared for auction and/or disposal. Auctions are coordinated with counterparts and supervised by NAS Logistics personnel with all funds received being returned to the appropriate program in accordance with regulations.

      Communications Equipment

      In 2007, the NAS continued to monitor the use and maintenance of radio equipment to support interdiction and eradication missions, including eight satellite phones provided to CORAH for use inn Lima, Pucallpa, and Santa Lucia.

      Computer Equipment

      The NAS continues to upgrade computer systems for counterparts, including surge suppressers and UPS as necessary in areas where the electrical current is unstable. In addition, the NAS is assisting counterparts in improving internal communications through LANs and web connections. Post encourages counterparts to automate inventory, case management and filing systems. These help to improve internal controls, produce a smoother flow of paperwork, and provide more accurate documents. Computer equipment provided to DIRANDRO. and CORAH is maintained at the assigned sites and upgraded as needed and as funds permit.

      Additional project equipment was provided to DEA's Sensitive Investigative Units (SIU's) in 2006. DEA agents performed End Use Monitoring activities throughout the year. They did not find any instances of equipment being misused, poorly maintained or used for purposes other than those intended by the USG.

      Defense Articles

      Drug Police (DINANDRO and DIVANDROS)-Weapons procured with FMF funds for use of DINANDRO and DIVANDROS participating in the counter-narcotics program are surveyed periodically by the NAS and MAAG representatives. There is no evidence that the equipment is being used for any purpose other than police counternarcotics operations. All monitored equipment was in serviceable condition. The NAS monitored 200 M-60D machine-guns and 131 M16A rifles received from DLA; 12 Smith & Wesson 357 Cal M-19, 14 M4 carbines, received from the RSO. The NAS, with INL approval, provides non-lethal weapons to the PNP (DIRANDRO). The weapons include twelve complete Pepperball systems.

      Riverine-The Chief of Mission and the NAS Director cancelled the NAS Riverine program due to inefficiency and lack of commitment by GOP counterparts. Personnel and resources previously dedicated to the NAS Riverine Program have been reprogrammed to the Maritime and Ports Program that is focused on interdicting drugs leaving Peru by sea and airports.

      Aircraft

      Working jointly with the Air Wing of the Police (DIRAVPOL), the Aviation Program, the program provides airlift support for interdiction and eradication missions. The process funds travel and incentive pay for aircrew and provided specialized training during 2007 totaled $3,880,000. With the lack of DOD 9201 funds for Initial Entry Rotary Wing (IERW), the NAS has had to fund this expensive training. In 2007, Aviation Program helicopters (UH-IIs) logged 7,209 hours. The total for aircraft flown was 9,694 flight hours. The NAS funded fuel and support to DIRAVPOL MI-17 helicopters and fixed wing aircraft during CN operations in 2007.

      The NAS supports a total of 23 USG-owned INL Airwing UH-II helicopters that are operated by the National Police Aviation Directorate (DIVAVPOL) for counternarcotics interdiction and eradication missions. NAS Lima received ten of the 23 in 2006. INL rotary wing assets are based at the Main Operating Base (MOB) in Pucallpa where all major helicopter maintenance is performed. In Lima, there is one fixed wing aircraft B 1900 D twin-engine passenger aircraft capable of carrying 19 passengers or cargo. This aircraft supports CN operations in Peru. The B 1900 is pressurized. Stationed east of the Andes at the Main Operating Base at Pucallpa is a fixed wing C-208 single engine passenger aircraft capable of carrying eight passengers or light cargo. The C-208 is not pressurized. GOP police MI-17 helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft are also used for counternarcotics operations. The NAS provides funding for maintenance and fuel for GOP aviation assets in support of CN operations. As needed, the NAS rents small aircraft to move personnel and cargo to locations east of the Andes. The NAS supports two FAP V-26s (four were donated by the USG) with maintenance support, fuel, and crew training. One of the FAP C-26 has a FLIR installed. The FLIR is interchangeable with the C-26s. The C-26s are used to identify illegal runways, reconnaissance, and transport for CN personnel in support of NAS and GOP CN efforts in Peru.

      NAS Aviation Program personnel and the INL Air Wing contractor DynCorp performed support and End Use Monitoring activities for the NAS Aviation Program in 2007. DynCorp and NAS aviation personnel maintain flight and maintenance records for all INL aircraft. A task order incorporated into DynCorp's contract authorizes procurement of spare parts, lubricants, chemical additives, and aviation life support equipment (ALSE) for CN aircraft. No diversion of NAS-purchased parts and equipment was detected.

      No additional aircraft were received during 2007. Two C-26s are owned by Peruvian Air Force (FAP). The NAS spent $2,975,142 in 2007, which included a maintenance, training, and operation package.

      MAAG continues to conduct EUM of 24 DragonflyA-37 aircraft. Two other aircraft have been lost to attrition and three are being used as static displays.

      The aviation program continues to be the cornerstone of the counternarcotics program. Without the airlift and emergency evacuation capabilities of the 23 INL helicopters, NAS-supported PNP helicopters and fixed aircraft, the eradicators would not have been able to operate in most coca-growing locations. The ability to move operations quickly from one location to another added to the element of unpredictability needed to safety operate in areas of grower resistance to eradication missions.

      Fuel

      The NAS provides all fuel required for the UH-1 and UH-II helicopters and the fixed-wing aircraft. In addition, the NAS also pays for fuel for police fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters on selected counternarcotics missions. The NAS closely monitors all fuel ordering, receiving, and dispensing procedures of fuel stocks for aviation. The NAS has Blanket Purchase Agreements (BPA's) with fuel suppliers and transporters and has ordering, receiving and payment procedures in place. In 2007, $2,594,465 was spent on the purchase of aviation fuel. An additional $238,000 was paid to transport the fuel from Lima to forward locations. The NAS in-house quality control of aviation fuel is strictly monitored through daily, weekly and monthly testing, weekly spot-checks and monthly audits. Additionally, the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) conducts quarterly inspections of DOD quality assurance of all in-plane contracts, which includes both NAS BPA's. All meet or exceed standards established by DLA.

      The NAS stores and dispenses fuel from 11 locations in Peru, nine of which are east of the Andes. The main facility is in Pucallpa and has a maximum Jet-A capacity of 42,500 gallons. Tingo Maria has a capacity of 35,000 gallons of Jet-A1. Aguaytia has 13,500; Santa Lucia has 40,000; Mazamari has 23,000; Palma Pampa has 18,000; Puerto Maldonado has 10,000; Las Palmas 10,000; Lima Grupo Ocho 9,500; and Pichari 14,500 gallons. All locations have CORAH-contracted refuelers who report daily to the NAS embassy Field Coordinator in Pucallpa. The NAS Petroleum Logistics Advisor visits all locations at least quarterly.

      During 2007, the NAS purchased fuel and space parts for the Maritime Program for use by Coast Guard Maritime Units for selective operations.

      Ion Scan Machines

      The three Ion scan machines purchased by Ports program, which detect atomic- sized particles of cocaine (or other drugs/explosives if so programmed) have been used daily on cases ranging from airport passengers to cargo and fishing vessels.

      Construction

      The NAS provides construction support to advance counternarcotics operations through CORAH personnel. During 2007, CORAH prepared 77 projects and executed 49 of these projects at a cost of $4,589,009. This included 20 projects for aviation, 19 for the Police Program, 5 for the Maritime and Ports Program, 4 for CORAH facilities, and 1 for the Drug Executive Office (OFECOD). In all cases, renovated facilities were used for their intended purpose.

      Weapons

      Weapons provided for the use of DIRANDO and DINANDRO (National and Provincial Drug Police) units that participate in the counternarcotics program are surveyed periodically by NAS and MAAG representatives. There are no indications that the weapons are being used for other than intended purposes. All monitorable equipment is in serviceable condition. The NAS monitors 200 M-60 machine guns and 131 M16A rifles received from DKA. The NAS with INL approval provided non-lethal weapons to the PNP (DIRANDRO). The non-lethal weapons include 102 complete Pepperball systems.

      Demand Reduction

      In 2007, the NAS Demand Reduction program provided funding for several drug prevention programs with a strong focus on community mobilization to increase protective factors that reduced the likelihood of drug abuse such as educating children and parents in school, training teachers, providing counseling and early intervention services. The Demand Reduction programs also provides funds for media campaign, printed material like manuals and workbooks, office equipment, office space, and consultant services, which provide reports evaluating the efforts and impact of the community anti-drugs coalition programs, and to develop a needs assessment and base-line study for six community anti-drug coalitions.

      The NAS provides funding to a number of NGOs to promote efforts designed to sensitize the Peruvian public about the harmful personal and societal effects of illegal drug consumption, production, and coca cultivation. The Demand Reduction office supports organizations in strengthening their institutional capacity, developing community-based activities for building social skills, and conducting surveys and research on drug abuse to identify groups requiring collaboration and assistance. Funding for this office also supports workshops for Peruvian professionals on drug abuse and prevention nationwide. Additionally, this funding supports a drug hotline counseling service and information center to reach the youth in the zones of intervention of the CACs.

      Problems

      Importation of Goods

      Over the years, NAS Logistics has been concerned with the fact that the Ministry of Interior has basically had control over the importation of goods under the bilateral agreement by originally creating tax libration codes in the name of the Ministry/USEmbassy. In 2007, NAS Logistics discovered that other GOP organizations and possibly independent customs agencies were importing and/or attempting to import goods duty free under the bilateral agreement using these codes. This was immediately reported to the NAS Director and Deputy Director. With their approval and support, NAS Logistics held several meetings with SUNAT and managed to reverse the situation and officially regain exclusive control and use of these codes for NAS. In doing so, NAS Logistics eliminated the requirement for four (4) Ministry of Interior/Peruvian Police customs dispatchers and replaced them with two (2) contracted personnel without affecting overall service to the mission.

      Registration of Vehicles

      In July 2007, NAS Logistics solved a long-standing problem for counternarcotics regarding registration of vehicles processed under the bilateral agreement and donated by the NAS. Counterparts can now legally register these vehicles in less than 15 days whereas in the past, some counterparts have been unsuccessful in obtaining standard licensing and registration for these vehicles.

      Reassignment of Vehicles

      During an inspection of DIVANDRO in late November, NAS Logistics discovered that two vehicles donated to a counternarcotics unit in Iquitos had been reassigned to other police sections (Vehicular traffic) by the Regional General of the Peruvian National Police (PNP). This was immediately reported to the NAS Police Program Adviser and Ports Program Adviser for their action.

      Impact

      The Government of Peru has had continued success throughout the year in conducting law enforcement operations. The statistics in seizures and arrests follow:

      Coca

      12,072.00 hectares

      Coca leaf seized

      1823.90 metric tons

      Cocaine HCL seized

      7.9.00 metric tons

      Essential chemicals seized

      858.25 metric tons

      Laboratories destroyed

      650.00

      Cocaine base/labs

      800.00

      Cocaine HCL labs

      16.00

      Arrests (Total)

      11,197.00

      Cocaine seizures in 2007 more than doubled 2005/2006 totals. The newly purchased body scanner allowed GOP personnel to interdict a record-breaking 408 internal carries during the months of August through January 2007. This new technology is being used as an enforcement detection tool. The maritime cargo effort yielded multiple several hundred-kilogram seizures in 2007."
    • According to the U.S. Southern Command 2009 Oak Hill Returns Home After Southern Partnership Station 2009, Exercises will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "Oak Hill, based at Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek, Va., departed June 3 for SPS 2009, a combined multinational naval and amphibious operation with Oak Hill and maritime forces from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru and Uruguay.

      Oak Hill also supported the U.S. Marine Corps Forces South (USMARSOUTH) multinational amphibious exercise, Southern Exchange 2009.

      During SPS 2009, Oak Hill embarked more than 20 partner nation liaison Sailors and Marines who worked and trained with the crew in daily shipboard operations. Embarked Sailors from the Expeditionary Training Command in Little Creek also shared their expertise in small boat operations; visit, board, search and seizure; and other areas during subject matter expert exchanges (SMEEs) with Sailors and Marines in Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil.

      Oak Hill Sailors who participated in SMEEs said they learned a lot from training with their Navy counterparts and enjoyed the experience.

      Oak Hill also conducted joint maritime security operations with the Uruguayan Navy. Together the navies executed a swept channel mine avoidance exercise and conducted deck landing qualifications (DLQs) with Uruguayan helicopter pilots. The crew also conducted DLQs with Brazilian pilots flying a Brazilian Super Puma helicopter."
    • According to the U.S. Southern Command 2009 Multinational Southern Exchange 2009 Exercise Begins in Brazil, Exercises will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "The multinational combined exercise is meant to train various countries’ forces together to effectively learn to operate as one force, as well as to bolster overall stability and security throughout the region. The countries participating this year are the United States, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Peru, Colombia and Uruguay.

      Afterward, the row of the nations’ flags was raised simultaneously, symbolizing the official start of SE09. Seven countries will work as one over the next three weeks, learning from each other and training together.


      During this two-phased exercise, Law of War and Human Rights classes will be taught daily, and training will be taught by various experts from each participating nation. Training will focus on fundamentals that are common amongst all Marine Corps' throughout the Americas: convoy operations, first aid, water survival, amphibious training, martial arts, patrolling, and checkpoint operations in order to enhance each nation’s peacekeeping and humanitarian disaster relief capabilities, should the need arise.


      Phase two will culminate with a three-day final peace-keeping exercise in which participants will showcase the lessons learned and seize the opportunity to utilize the mission-focused knowledge and expertise shared amongst each other during the initial phase."
    • According to the U.S. Southern Command 2009 U.S., Partner Nation Marines and Sailors Join for Southern Exchange Exercise in Brazil, Exercises will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "Brazil’s Marine Corps, or Corpo de Fuzileiros Navais (CFN), will host approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors from the United States, Argentina, Chile, Peru, Colombia and Uruguay for exercise Southern Exchange 2009 (SE09), July 13-31 at the Divisão Anfibia and the island of Marambaia, Rio de Janeiro.

      This year’s exercise is designed as a transparent, multinational exchange that focuses on enhancing proficiency and interoperability between partner nation Marine Corps’ forces.

      SE09 helps to strengthen relationships resulting in improved stability and security throughout the region. The concept of operations is structured toward Marine fundamentals and focused on building partner nation capability to execute United Nations’ coalition missions such as Haiti and Congo.

      During this two-phased exercise Law of War and Human Rights classes will be taught daily, and training will be taught by various experts representing each participating nation.

      Training will focus on fundamentals that are common amongst all Marines throughout the Americas: convoy operations, first aid, water survival, amphibious training, martial arts, patrolling, and checkpoint operations in order to enhance each nation’s peacekeeping and humanitarian disaster relief capabilities.

      Phase two will culminate with a three-day final peacekeeping exercise in which participants will showcase the lessons learned and seize the opportunity to utilize the mission-focused knowledge and expertise shared amongst each other during the initial phase.

      Lt. Col. Miguel Ameigeiras, the MARFORSOUTH SE09 exercise director, says that he sees multinational combined exercises as the way of the future for U.S. Marine Corps involvement in South America."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2009 U.S. Ships Take Part in Operacion Multinacional Alianza Naval Exercise reports that Exercises aid to Peru will do the following:
      "Ships from Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru and the United States are participating in Operacion Multinacional Alianza, a post-UNITAS Gold naval exercise hosted by Colombia, from May 8 to 14.

      Participating ships are BNS Constituicao (F-42), CS Blanco Encalada (CF-15), ARC Almirante Padilla (FM-51), ARC Cartagena De Indias (BL-161), BAP Aguirre (FM-55), USS Doyle (FFG-39) and USS Kauffman (FFG-59).

      During the exercise, participants will practice Maritime Interdiction Operations, ship formations, anti-submarine warfare, air attack exercises and practice firing."
    • The U.S. Department of State 2010 FY 2010 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations contains this description of aid to Peru:
      "The United States will help the Government of Peru (GOP) consolidate its democratic gains and assist in ensuring that the benefits of trade and economic growth are shared broadly, especially among the poor and long-excluded population in marginalized areas and assist in ensuring effective implementation of the U.S.- Peru Trade Promotion Agreement. U.S. foreign assistance will also help the government assert control over its territory, thereby denying terrorists and other criminals access to areas to train, organize, or transit.

      Peace and Security: The United States will help build economic, political, and social stability in fragile areas of Peru by improving law enforcement, strengthening the linkages between former coca-growing communities and their local governments, providing opportunities for licit economic activities, and improving the capacities of local government. More than 48,000 hectares of licit crops developed with U.S. assistance continue to bolster the economy. Assistance to former coca growers will help them increase their incomes by 10 percent. Complemented by alternative development activities, other U.S. programs will focus on eradication to sustain the reduction in coca cultivation and will also boost interdiction capabilities in drug producing areas and gateways to foreign markets. Eradication and interdiction efforts are expected to keep 30 percent of Peru’s estimated cocaine production from reaching the market. U.S. assistance will help the GOP enforce money-laundering laws and reduce drug use. Funding will also help professionalize and modernize the Peruvian military through training focused on the professional development of military officers at U.S. military colleges and schools, and on the development of joint doctrine and procedures. Training and equipment will be provided to the Peruvian military to enhance its border security and ability to control its national territory. Additionally, assistance will support improving civil-military relations, peacekeeping, humanitarian efforts, and disaster relief capabilities.

      Working with the Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. assistance will be used for the professional development of mid-grade military officers, non-commissioned officers, and selected civilians. This training will improve Peru’s capabilities in the following areas: counter-narcoterrorism operations in a joint and combined environment; establishment of joint doctrine; and the execution of joint operations, including improved civil-military relations, peacekeeping operations, humanitarian assistance, and disaster relief operations. These objectives will be met through the use of resident courses in the United States as well as through Mobile Training Teams in Peru. The additional funds will be used to expand the number of host country military personnel to be trained.

      Governing Justly and Democratically: The United States will assist and collaborate with local governments in selected regions to respond to citizen needs and provide public services more efficiently and effectively. U.S. assistance will help ensure that resources generated by extractive industries are invested transparently into programs that meet citizen needs. Activities will build on the successes of past programs that helped over 500 municipalities improve transparency and effectiveness and increased local public investments.

      Following fair and transparent elections in 2006, the challenge facing Peru is to show that democracy can deliver to all its citizens, rich or poor. While the Government of Peru has identified decentralization as one of his top policy reforms, progress remains uneven. As a result, and partially due to a weak and fragmented 650 political system, public opinion polls indicate that citizens' disillusionment with the current political system has increased. In FY 2010, funds will assist political parties to articulate their platforms and policy agendas and develop voter-outreach strategies to inform the Peruvian electorate on important policy issues identified by citizens.

      Investing in People: The United States will work with the GOP to improve the quality of social services. U.S. programs will strengthen key aspects of health systems and services, including the quality of care and promotion of healthy behaviors. Technical assistance in maternal and child health, infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS, and family planning and reproductive health will assist national, regional, and local entities to address persistent problems in Peru’s health sector, such as inequity, inefficiency, and poor quality. Results will include increased institutional birth attendance, reductions in maternal and infant mortality and chronic malnutrition, and a lower incidence of infectious diseases.

      Education activities will build on past programs that have demonstrated increased academic achievement among students in basic education (e.g., 71 percent of students reaching mastery or near mastery levels in reading and writing in U.S.-supported schools vs. 41 percent in control schools). U.S. programs will help improve learning outcomes in primary education by supporting policy and institutional reforms, and strengthening the management and technical capacity of the national, regional, and local governments to deliver quality education services efficiently and effectively. These programs also will focus on improving the quality of teaching, and participatory and decentralized education management which will include capacity building in education planning and implementation; evidence-based policy and decision-making; implementing teacher training standards and programs; enhancing community participation and dialogue; increasing accountability; and building public-private partnerships.

      FY 2010 funds will support a new education program that begins in FY 2009. The new program will focus on administrators’ and officials’ abilities to implement key education reforms. Thus, the indicator is new for this program. The first year of the program will begin laying the foundation for training administrators and officials, while increasing the number of regions in Peru that receive technical assistance and training. The additional funds in FY 2010 will be used to expand the program geographically from two to five (or more) regions, thereby increasing the impact of the U.S. education program.

      Economic Growth: Trade capacity building assistance will seek to eliminate the most important barriers to trade and investment for micro, small, and medium enterprises. In cooperation with the GOP, the United States will help extend the benefits of free trade to Peru's poorest citizens by linking local producers in the impoverished highlands and Amazon regions to national and international markets. U.S. programs will help the economically disadvantaged overcome bureaucratic barriers to improving business practices, including 651 the reduction in time and cost of starting and managing a business. U.S. assistance will help Peru promote sustainable forest management, increase transparency in environmental decisions, and comply with the environmental provisions of the Peru Trade Promotion Agreement. The United States will help Peru’s Ministry of Labor strengthen its labor inspection system by implementing a risk-based inspection program, improving the efficiency and effectiveness of labor dispute settlement mechanisms, and assisting workers exercise their labor rights.

      Linkages with the Millennium Challenge Corporation In June 2008, the United States signed a bilateral agreement with the GOP to implement a MCC Threshold Country Program to reduce corruption in public administration and improve nationwide immunization coverage."
    • According to the U.S. Southern Command 2009 U.S., Partner Nation Marines Arrive in Jacksonville for UNITAS Gold, POA, Exercises will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "During the two-week combined exercise, U.S. Marines deployed as Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force 24 (SPMAGTF 24), will train with partner nation marines from Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay, and soldiers from the Royal Canadian Army. In all more than 25 ships, 50 rotary and fixed wing aircraft, 650 Marines, 6,500 Sailors and four submarines will participate in the exercise.

      Comprised of Marines from the II Marine Expeditionary Force, Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 764 (HMM-764), 4th Marine Logistics Group and the 24th Marine Regiment, headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., the SPMAGTF 24, commanded by Col. Jay Huston, will conduct an amphibious assault as part of the ground training in support of this year’s 50th iteration of UNITAS.

      POA is an annual U.S. Marine Corps Forces, South multinational, company-level combined and joint exercise that focuses on enhancing interoperability between U.S. Marines and partner-nation marines in the areas of amphibious operations, non-combatant evacuation operations (NEO), peacekeeping and disaster relief.

      The combined exercise will provide exercise participants the opportunity to train in a realistic training environment on both land and sea, and will address a variety of mission areas; featuring live-fire exercises, undersea warfare, shipboard operations, maritime interdiction operations, air defense and surface warfare, amphibious operations, electronic warfare, and special warfare. Successful training of POA 09 and UNITAS Gold participants will enable them to return to their respective nations to further train their nation’s security forces by sharing the lessons learned from this experience."
    • The U.S Department of State 2008 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report reports that aid to Peru will do the following:
      "Policy Initiatives. U.S. assistance to Peru focuses on strengthening governance and creating space for legal activities in isolated areas where drug traffickers and terrorists operate, using aggressive eradication, interdiction, and chemical control to reduce drug production; coupled with alternative development efforts geared to reduce dependence on illicit coca cultivation. The USG also provides support for GOP efforts to improve its counter-terrorism efforts and publicize the links between drug production and common crime; so that Peruvians understand that their quality of life (and not just that of United States citizens) is degraded by drug-trafficking.

      Bilateral Cooperation. In 2008, the USG continued to work with the GOP on counterdrug operations in the major drug source zones of the UHV and the VRAE. The PNP received USG assistance to increase police presence and their operational productivity in these areas by supporting and renewing existing police bases and enhancing police training. Other U.S. government provided training included maritime law enforcement and container inspection. With U.S. Embassy support, DIRANDRO commanders and field personnel received specialized counternarcotics courses, including U.S. Special Forces Training, Colombian and Bolivian Police Jungle Schools, and refresher courses in advanced airport drug interdiction and chemical field testing. Law enforcement officials from other Andean countries also participated in the training courses, which contributes to regional cooperation in drug investigations and interdiction.

      Peru's law enforcement organizations conducted joint operations with neighboring countries, and participated in drug enforcement strategy conferences to address drug trafficking along its borders, such as the joint chemical diversion—Operation Seis Fronteras. This multilateral initiative is conducted at various stages during the year to combat the diversion of controlled chemicals to illicit markets where these chemicals are utilized. At the September 2008 evaluation conference, participants chose Peru as the host country for Phase XI of Seis Fronteras in 2009.

      The Cooperating Nation Information Exchange System (CNIES) Agreement signed in 2005 between the USG and the GOP enables the USG and other cooperating nations to share intelligence concerning trafficking of drugs by air. CNIES has been implemented in Air Force of Peru (FAP) locations in Lima, Pucallpa, and Iquitos.

      The Military Assistance and Advisory Group (MAAG) coordinated and conducted CNIES training for FAP personnel and shifted radar assets in response to intelligence indicating potential trafficking by air. FAP conducted joint training exercises with Brazil and Colombia. Since 2005 the FAP Joint Anti-Drug C-26 Air Squadron, supported by NAS, has conducted CN reconnaissance and airlift east of the Andes. The C-26 Forward Looking INFRA-RED (FLIR) was used to map suspected clandestine runways in Peru and update the status of known airstrips. The FAP C-26s provide critical overhead real time coverage for eradication workers, eradication police, and army personnel in the field. The installation in 2008 of a visual spectrum mapping camera in the C-26 program will provide imagery of coca fields to aid in planning eradication operations in the UHV (Upper Huallaga Valley)."
    • The U.S. Department of Defense 2007 Section 1209 Report to Congress on Foreign-Assitance Related Programs Carried out by the Department of Defense reports that Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru will do the following:
      "Projects support USSOUTHCOM TSC goal to shape the environment by promoting democracy, regional prosperity, and stability."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 New Horizons Peru leaves behind quality of life projects, goodwill reports that Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru will do the following:
      "After three months of construction, medical missions and bonding with the people of Peru, U.S. servicemembers here completed their mission of providing humanitarian aid to the underprivileged.

      Since June 1, a rotating task force of 950 active duty, Reservists and Guardsmen from the Air Force, Marines, Army and Navy built three medical clinics, two school houses, a fresh water well and carried out nine medical missions that provided free medical care to the Peruvian people.

      The New Horizons construction crews worked hard at providing their best work for the Peruvians while finishing two weeks ahead of schedule. The 820th Rapid Engineer Deployable Heavy Operational Repair Squadron Engineer (RED HORSE) squadron from Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., was not only the lead agency for the task force, but the RED HORSE Airmen also led the construction of a clinic and a school house in Yanama, a village with a population of almost 8,000, and a clinic in San Cristobal, a town of 9,000.

      Marine Wing Support Squadron 472 from Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Willow Grove, Pa., supported the New Horizons mission by constructing a clinic and schoolhouse in Yanamilla, which is home to more than 6,000 Peruvians.

      Sailors, or "Seabees," from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 74 from Gulfport, Miss., constructed a well in the village of Asangaro, which will bring fresh water to the town of 1,200.

      The facilities are long-term quality-of-life projects, but the medical missions provided much needed care for the people of Ayacucho. Medical teams from the Air Force and Navy Reserves treated 12,414 Peruvian patients in nine villages. The teams provided general medical care and diagnosis, dental check-ups and extractions, eye exams, pharmaceutical prescriptions and public health lessons.

      The Reservists came from all around the United States for the medical missions. Air Force medical teams primarily from the 452nd Medical Group from March Air Reserve Base, Calif., and the 433rd MDG from Lackland AFB, Texas, treated patients at the villages Yanamilla, San Cristobal, Chiara, Carmen Alto, Mollepata and Quinua. The Navy medical team from Operational Health Support Unit-Great Lakes, Ill., one of only two Reserve Field Units in the entire Navy, treated patients in San Juan Bautista, Cobadonga and Tambillo. The leftover medical supplies from the medical missions have been stocked in the newly constructed medical clinics or donated to Ayacucho´s Ministry of Health to continue to help the Peruvian people.

      New Horizons ensured the medical clinics and schoolhouses were ready for immediate and long-term use. The clinics are ready for doctors to begin treating patients thanks to a $320,000 donation of medical supplies collected and donated by the Volunteers for Inter-American Development Assistance. The schoolhouses have desks, books, airplane science kits and backpacks with school supplies. The backpacks were donated by the Give A Kid A Backpack Foundation, as well as the Church of Latter-Day Saints, the science kits from Agilent Technologies, and the books were provided by the U.S. Embassy, the Tucson Rotary Club Reading Seed, and Airmen from Davis-Monthan AFB, Ariz. The desks were purchased by the task force with funds from the Military Assistance Advisory Group at the U.S. Embassy in Lima.

      In addition to the scheduled projects, task force members found additional ways to reach out to the Peruvian people. The 820th RED HORSE Squadron services section organized a field trip to the local museum and zoo for the base camp´s school children."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 New Horizons brings medical care to 12,414 Peruvians says this about Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "After three months of performing nine medical missions, New Horizons medical readiness training exercises have come to a close with a total of 12,414 Peruvians treated by Air Force and Navy medical reservists.

      From June 21 to Aug. 7, 86 service members provided free medical care to nine villages in the Ayacucho region of Peru as part of New Horizons - Peru 2008."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 U.S. Troops Provide Medical Care to 2,000 Peruvians contains this description of Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "With only half their medical team and three less days to see patients, the final medical readiness training exercises for New Horizons-Peru 2008 still provided medical care to more than 2,000 Peruvians.

      A 19-man team from the 433rd Medical Group out of Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, treated the patients in the Ayacucho region, Aug. 1-7, as part of New Horizons. New Horizons is a U.S. long-term U.S. Southern Command sponsored program to bring humanitarian assistance to countries in Latin and Caribbean nations.

      The 433rd MDG´s team was made up of doctors, a dentist and optometrist, dental technicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacy technicians, and an administrator. The Airmen provided general medical care and diagnosis, dentistry, optometry, pharmaceutical needs and public health education. The team treated patients in Mollepata, Carmen Alto and Quinua over the course of six days."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 IAAFA comes to JTF-Bravo, first time in 19 years classes held in C.A. reports that aid to Peru will do the following:
      "For the first time in 19 years, Inter-American Air Forces Academy instructors provided Air Force professional military education on Central American soil.

      The IAAFA staff set up shop here and began instructing the Air Force Noncommissioned Officer Academy PME curriculum to 24 NCOs from 10 Latin American nations' air forces.

      Airmen from Chile, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay attended the academy.

      Joint Task Force-Bravo is hosting IAAFA by providing the infrastructure needed to provide support for the staff and students.

      The two instructors and one administrator from Lackland provided the students with professional military education curriculum mirroring the Air Force NCO Academy and Squadron Officer School courses."
    • According to the U.S. Department of Defense 2007 Fiscal Year 2007 DoD Foreign Counterdrug Activity Report, Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "NATION: Peru

      PROJECT/BASE SUPPORT EFFORT: A&E design for riverine base infrastructure improvements in Pichari for the Peruvian Navy.

      PROJECT CODE: 9201

      FUNDING ($K): $88K

      DESCRIPTION: Provides design for a forward operating site in the Apurimac Valley in support of Peruvian Army and National Police operations. Project is the initial phase of Plan VRAE, which is a Govemment of Peru plan to assume greater govemment control over the Apurimac and Ene river valleys."
    • According to the U.S. Southern Command 2008 U.S. Sailors Provide Free Medical Care In Peru, Humanitarian and Civic Assistance will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "Thirty Sailors from the U.S. Navy are working during 10 days to treat an estimated 4,000 to 6,000 Peruvian patients as part of the second phase of New Horizons - Peru 2008 Medical Readiness Training Exercises, July 21 to 31.

      The Peruvian people will have the opportunity to receive basic medical care including diagnosis, pharmacy services, dental exams and optical services.

      During the first two days of the exercise, the OHSU team has found the most common ailments are rotted teeth, stomach worms, and a basic need for glasses, which the medical team is prepared to care for thanks to donations of prescription glasses from the Texas Lions´ Club.

      On the first day of their medical mission, the team treated 404 patients, but by the second day, outpatient numbers ballooned to 599.

      Previously, Air Force medics carried out three-day medical missions in the towns of Yanamilla, San Cristobal and Chiara in late June. More than 4,800 Peruvians received free medical attention over the course of those nine days."
    • According to the U.S. Southern Command 2008 Marines make back-to-school, doctors visits better for Peruvian people, Humanitarian and Civic Assistance will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "Marines from the Marine Wing Support Squadron 472 Detachments Minus out of Willard Grove, Pa., Alpha out of Wyoming, Pa., and Bravo out of Chicopee, Mass., are nearing the completion of a schoolhouse in San Jose and medical clinic in Yanamilla, in the Ayacucho region, as part of New Horizons - Peru 2008. New Horizons is an annual U.S. Southern Command-sponsored program to bring humanitarian assistance to Latin and Caribbean nations.

      Since June 1, more than 150 Marines have worked on the clinic and schoolhouse. In what was supposed to take two and a half months to complete, the Marines are scheduled to finish their projects two weeks early.

      Once completed, the school will have two classrooms, a library, latrines and electricity. The medical clinic will have five patient rooms, a storage room, a lobby, a restroom with running water, doctor´s quarters, windows, fluorescent lights, ceiling fans, and electricity.

      Although it was not part of their original plans, the Marines took it upon themselves to build an outside retaining wall in to provide long-term stability for the clinic.

      After the sites were chosen for the schoolhouse and clinic, local contractors laid a concrete slab as foundations for the two buildings in May. By early June, the MWSS 472 began building the infrastructure with concrete blocks and reinforced them with vertical rebars for structural integrity. Local contractors will install the roof before the MWSS 472 returns to work on the plumbing, carpentry, electrical work and a painting."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 Air Force Reserve medics treat 4,800 Peruvians during New Horizons-Peru 2008 contains this description of Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "U.S. Air Force Reserve medical personnel cared for more than 4,860 Peruvians during the first round of medical missions here for New Horizons - Peru 2008, a U.S. and Peruvian humanitarian mission focused on providing relief to underprivileged Peruvians.

      The U.S. Air Force Reserve medical team, working alongside their Peruvian counterparts, treated a number of ailments, including those unique to the South American region. In addition to the medical relief provided through New Horizons, a number of other humanitarian efforts are also in progress, which includes the construction of much needed medical clinics, schools and water wells to improve the quality-of-life for people living in the poorest regions of Ayacucho, Peru.

      The New Horizons Air Force Reserve medical team provided care in dentistry, general medicine, internal medicine, optometry, as well as public health lessons for three days at three separate sites - San Jose, San Cristobal and Chiara. The team also provided more than $40,000 in pharmaceutical drugs for their Peruvian patients.

      Some of the most prevalent medical conditions found within Peruvian communities included eyesight deficiencies, eye infections, skin diseases and upper respiratory conditions."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 Seabees Drill for Water During Humanitarian Mission in Peru says this about Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "Eighteen U.S. Navy Seabees here are mid-way through the completion of a construction project in support of New Horizons - Peru 2008, a humanitarian effort focused on bringing vital quality-of-life projects to the people of the Ayacucho region.

      Once completed, the water well construction project will provide much needed drinking water to Peruvians in the Huanta province. In addition, the New Horizons mission will offer expert medical care and vertical construction projects intended to strengthen the bonds of friendship between Peru and the U.S. through teamwork, mutual respect and lasting facilities to assist underserved communities.

      The Seabees, a team of construction engineers deployed from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 74 in Gulfport, Miss., are scheduled to construct two wells, one in Azangaro and one in Luricocha, each costing approximately $50,000. As a contingency, the Seabees have also identified a reserve well site if water is not found at the two projected sites.

      The engineers will drill more than 100 feet below the surface at each site in order to extract drinking water for the more than 200 people in the local area who are affected by a yearly drought usually occuring between August and October.

      The well construction is scheduled to continue through Aug. 10. Over the three-month duration of the U.S. and Peruvian humanitarian mission, more than 990 U.S. servicemembers are scheduled to contribute more than 240,000 man-hours to the mission. New Horizons Peru-2008, scheduled to run through Aug. 31, will also include the construction of three clinics and two schools."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 UNITAS Pacific Exercise Concludes off Coast of Peru reports that Exercises aid to Peru will do the following:
      "The maritime exercise UNITAS Pacific 2008 concluded off the coast of Peru July 1 after navies from seven countries participated in anti-submarine warfare exercises against live submarine targets, anti-aircraft warfare events, gunnery exercises, and maritime interception operations, among others.

      Under the leadership of the Peruvian Navy, seven maritime nations came together for UNITAS 49-08 Pacific Phase for nearly two weeks to carry out a complex and challenging exercise designed to unite respective navies in friendship, mutual cooperation and a commitment to regional security. Participants in this year’s UNITAS include Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and the United States, with observers from Argentina and Mexico.

      The annual UNITAS exercise strengthens relationships with partner countries by providing activities during the in-port phase on a sailor-to-sailor level such as sporting events, community relations projects, and social activities that truly foster a “persona” relationship amongst the partner nations.

      Operationally, multinational sailors collectively working together to plan, develop and execute the complex events and scenarios also greatly contributing to an ever-expanding relationship between the partner nations."
    • According to the U.S. Southern Command 2008 USS Boxer Concludes Latin-American Humanitarian Mission, Humanitarian and Civic Assistance will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "USS Boxer returned to port yesterday after a two-month humanitarian and civic assistance mission to Latin America.

      During the deployment, Boxer visited Guatemala, El Salvador and Peru as part of the Pacific phase of Continuing Promise 2008.

      On April 28, the Boxer crew left San Diego accompanied by medical professionals from 25 different commands from around the world. In addition to the augmented medical team, personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service and the nongovernmental organization Project Hope accompanied the crew on the two-month humanitarian mission.

      Also accompanying the Boxer crew were 60 Seabees from Navy Seabee Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 303, who performed a variety of construction projects in the three countries. Their work included plumbing and electrical work, as well as roof repairs and upgrades.

      The medical professionals aboard Boxer saw more than 14,000 patients, completed 127 surgeries, dispensed 40,000 medications and saw nearly 4,000 optometry patients, distributing about 3,500 pairs of eyeglasses. They also completed 14,000 dental procedures and 66 repairs to biomedical equipment in the various clinics and hospitals where they worked, the captain said.

      A veterinarian team saw about 2,900 animals, he added.

      The Boxer crew also provided valuable training, such as CPR, nutrition, basic sanitation techniques, and first aid to 18,000 students in 123 classes, and took time to educate patients standing in line for medical treatment."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 Pan-American UNITAS Naval Force Renovates Peruvian School says this about Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "Two dozen Sailors from guided-missile Destroyer USS Forrest Sherman (DDG-98), guided-missile Destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) and guided-missile Frigate USS Kauffman (FFG 59) joined members of the Chilean, Colombian, Ecuadorian and Peruvian navies to refurbish a public school in the countryside of Peru June 22.

      This multinational force, including the three United States ships assigned to Destroyer Squadron 40 (DESRON 40), collaborated on the project before getting underway for the 2008 UNITAS Pacific Phase (UNITAS PAC) operation. UNITAS is an annual series of exercises - hosted this year by Peru in the port city of Callao, near Lima - that involves warships and military observers from North, Central and South American nations.

      The Jose Andres Razuri Estevez School, whose 50 faculty and staff serve 1,500 students of all ages from the surrounding neighborhood in Callao’s mountainous northern district of Ventanilla. The Sailors spent six hours repainting the exterior walls of three classroom buildings and replacing several burnt-out and missing fluorescent light bulbs.

      Upon receiving a hearty welcome from a large group of the school’s younger pupils, the Forrest Sherman, Farragut and Kauffman crewmembers unloaded three pallets, weighing approximately 1,500 pounds, of toys, sporting goods, and first aid items; all donated through the Chief of Naval Operations’ Project Handclasp."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 U.S. Coast Guard, Navy Train Alongside South American Sailors contains this description of Exercises aid to Peru:
      "The Coast Guard International Training Division conducted a seminar to exchange knowledge with Navies from Ecuador, Chile and Peru on hand-to-hand combat and Vehicle Boarding Search and Seizure (VBSS) during UNITAS Pacific Phase 49-08."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 U.S. Troops Begin Medical Mission in Peru says this about Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "Continuing in their effort to provide relief to underprivileged Peruvians, U.S. service members here Monday kicked off the medical mission of New Horizons - Peru 2008, a U.S. and Peruvian humanitarian initiative scheduled through Aug. 31.

      The humanitarian medical mission, currently staffed by 35 U.S. Air Force medics, will provide free medical care to people living in the poorest regions of Ayacucho, Peru. At the same time, the Task Force New Horizons team is currently constructing much needed medical clinics, schools and waters wells during the three-month mission.

      The New Horizons - Peru Air Force medical team is providing dentistry, general medicine, internal medicine, optometry, as well as public health lessons for three days at three separate sites - Yanamilla, San Cristobal and Chiara. The team will also provide more than $40,000 in pharmaceutical drugs for their Peruvian patients. To defuse the two-way language barrier, the medical team deployed 17 medical personnel fluent in Spanish to aid doctors in diagnosing health issues and providing quality medical care.

      During the three-month humanitarian mission, U.S. Air Force, Army and Navy medical personnel, operating on a rotational schedule, will lead nine, three-day medical operations and are scheduled to treat up to 750 patients per day and up to 20,000 patients over the duration of the mission.

      While there are Airmen from various Air Force units participating in this rotation of the medical missions, the majority of the medical staff come from the 152nd Medical Group and the 163rd Medical Group from March Air Reserve Base, Calif., along with the 79th Medical Wing from Andrews Air Force Base, Md."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 UNITAS Pacific Exercise Begins in Peru says this about Exercises aid to Peru:
      "UNITAS 49-08, an annual multinational exercise conducted to enhance interoperability and mutual cooperation between navies, began off the coast of Callao, Peru on June 21.

      UNITAS 49-08, hosted by Peru, brings together nations with common interests in the Americas, and includes Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and the United States. Mexico is also participating in UNITAS as an observer.

      UNITAS, now in its 49th consecutive year, strengthens relationships between partner nations through at-sea operations under numerous maritime scenarios.

      Capt. Rodelio Laco, Destroyer Squadron 40 Commodore, said that that this type of exercise increases proficiency and interoperability, but also builds trust between partner nations.

      Participating in this year’s UNITAS Pacific Phase from the United States are staff elements from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, Destroyer Squadron 40, USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98), USS Farragut (DDG 99), USS Kauffman (FFG 59), U.S. Coast Guard International Training Division and personnel from the U.S. Marine Corps.

      UNITAS provides unique training opportunities at sea, a challenging and uncertain environment, which incorporates event driven scenarios to provide the maximum opportunity to improve a better working environment between the Navies.

      While there is not a specific threat that the exercise is designed to counter, the goal is to train forces from participating nations in maritime operations such as Electronic Warfare, Anti-Air Warfare and Air Defense, Anti-Submarine Warfare, Anti-Surface Warfare, and Maritime Interdiction Operations."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 U.S, Peruvian Navy Complete in ASW Exercise says this about Exercises aid to Peru:
      "Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 40 and assigned units guided-missile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG-99) and USS Forrest Sherman (DDG-98), along with guided-missile frigate USS Kauffman (FFG-59) joined forces with the Peruvian Navy for a six day Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) training exercise off the coast of Lima, Peru, which ended June 18th.

      The exercise, Silent Forces Exercise 2008 (SIFOREX) consisted of 4 days of intense, structured ASW practice, followed by an 18-hour “scenario phase,” an unscripted event in which units simulated a real-world ASW situation.

      The U.S. ships, joined by the Peruvian BAP Villavisencio (FM-52) and BAP Montero (FM 53) were tasked with finding the small, quiet Peruvian diesel submarines, BAP Chipana (SS-34) and BAP Antofagasta (SS-32)."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 Continuing Promise Completes Work in Peru, Boxer Heads Home contains this description of Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "Peruvian officials bid farewell to USS Boxer (LHD 4), June 15, during a closing ceremony in the town of Barranca, marking the end of the Pacific phase of Continuing Promise (CP) 2008.

      During the 6-day operation in Peru, Boxer’s embarked military units worked side-by-side with partner-nation military and civilian professionals to provide medical, dental, optometry and veterinary care along with renovation work at two schools.

      Medical specialists from Boxer, Fleet Surgical Team (FST) 5, and the U.S. Public Health Service worked together with Peruvian medical professionals to conduct more than 4,000 dental exams and procedures, nearly 1,000 optometry exams in addition to giving out 900 pairs of eye glasses. The team also provided nearly 3,000 patients primary medical care and dispensed more than 11,000 medications at several sites in the area.

      While anchored off the coast, FST 5 performed 22 surgeries on Peruvian citizens aboard Boxer.

      Seabees assigned to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 303 and Navy Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5 teamed up to complete renovation projects at two schools. The work included major plumbing and electrical upgrades, roof replacement, and replacing windows in addition to painting and landscaping."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 Continuing Promise Completes Medical Operations in Peru contains this description of Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "Sailors embarked aboard USS Boxer (LHD 4), completed the last day of medical operations at Guillermo Enrique Billinghurst school in Barranca, Peru, June 15 in support of Continuing Promise (CP) 2008.

      During one week of operations at the school in Peru, they cared for more than 800 medical patients, 125 dental patients, 200 optometry patients and distributed more than 2,500 medical prescriptions each day."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 Continuing Promise Reinforces Peru’s Preventative Medicine Program says this about Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "Continuing Promise (CP) 2008’s Preventative Medicine Team held a public health and sanitation seminar for partner-nation citizens from Juara, Peru, June 12, in support of USS Boxer’s (LHD 4) humanitarian civic assistance (HCA) mission.

      The team held the seminar with the assistance of Huara’s Chief of Medicine, Dr. Edgar Jara-Salas, at the Juara municipal center for the benefit of the more than 40 local health service providers, public health officials, restaurant owners and food handlers in attendance.

      The seminar began with instruction on sanitation techniques for food preparation, cooking temperature, utensil disinfection and pest control. By imparting these techniques, the team hopes to help the local citizens prevent food-borne illnesses such as Salmonella, E-Coli, Botchulism and Tuberculosis.

      The next topic of the lesson focused on water contamination. The training discussed the ways citizens could sterilize their water supply and steps the city officials could take to ensure the health and safety of people in the region.

      The last topic of the day was about insect-borne diseases and ways for the citizens to control the pest population and protect themselves from exposure to these illnesses."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 Continuing Promise Seabees Begin School Renovation in Peru contains this description of Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "Seabees from Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 303, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5 and Sailors from USS Boxer (LHD 4) began renovations at Peru’s Luis Fabio Xammer Jurado School, June 11, as part of Continuing Promise (CP) 2008.

      The Seabees’ goal is to repair and install plumbing for two bathroom facilities, replace a section of the roof, install new lighting, repair electrical outlets and replace ceiling fans and windows. Most of the work focuses around a six-classroom section of the school that has not seen repairs in about 15 years.

      A total of 65 Seabees, Boxer Sailors and Peruvians worked together tackling the tasks at the site. Thirty Boxer Sailors were on site as part of a Sailor-Assistance Project, which includes painting interior and exterior walls of the school’s classrooms in addition to providing landscaping services to the school grounds."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 U.S., Peruvian Navies Kick Off Anti-Submarine Warfare Exercise says this about Exercises aid to Peru:
      "U.S. Navy forces teamed up with their Peruvian Navy counterparts this week to begin the bilateral anti-submarine warfare (ASW) exercise, Silent Forces Exercise (SIFOREX) 2008.

      The exercise, led by Destroyer Squadron 40 (DESRON 40) and hosted by the Peruvian Submarine force in Callao, Peru, will involve guided-missile Destroyers USS Forrest Sherman (DDG-98), USS Farragut (DDG 99), guided-missile Frigate USS Kauffman (FFG-59), two SH-60B helicopters, and four Peruvian Type 209 diesel submarines, training together over a six day period beginning June 12.

      SIFOREX, which focuses exclusively on Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW), is the longest such exercise in which the US units will participate this year. Over the six-day period, Peruvian Naval surface units, including frigates BAP Villavicencio (FM-52), BAP Montero (FM-53), and amphibious landing ship tank BAP Pisco (DT-142) will team up with the US Ships to practice ASW against four Peruvian diesel submarines—BAP Antofagasta, BAP Arica, BAP Pisagua, and BAP Chipana (SS-31, 32, 33, and 34)."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 Continuing Promise Begins Medical Work in Peru says this about Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "Medical professionals embarked aboard USS Boxer (LHD 4) opened the doors of Peru’s Salon Parochial medical site, June 10, to provide healthcare during the Peruvian phase of Continuing Promise (CP) 2008.

      CP’s doctors and medical professionals spent the day at the church site at Huacho, Peru which was converted to a make-shift medical clinic for the visit. The crew worked with Peruvian medical professionals and interpreters to provide services from several fields.

      Treatments provided by the optometrists include routine eye exams and screenings for surgery in addition to giving out prescription glasses to those in need.

      This was the first of three days at the site. Patients receiving other healthcare services in just the first day included more than 500 medical patients, 129 dental patients in addition to more than 1,000 prescribed medications given out by the pharmacy."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 USS Boxer Begins Humanitarian Mission in Peru contains this description of Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "CP’s medical contingent, led by the embarked Fleet Surgical Team (FST) 5, will spend six work days alongside local medical providers in Huacho at Peru’s Salon Parochial Church and at Billinghurst School in Barranca providing primary medical care to more than 2,500 Peruvian citizens.

      The team will also spend six days at Peru’s Huacho Regional Hospital performing repairs to bio-medical hospital equipment and holding education and training sessions for the hospital staff, while also sharing ideas and experiences on best practices for long-term public health solutions.

      While anchored off the coastline, Boxer’s medical facilities will host approximately 25 surgical patients over the six-day period. Surgeries will include cyst and gall bladder removal and minor hernia repair.

      The embarked Navy Seabee Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 303 will join local civil engineers for structure renovations at two local schools.

      At Peru’s Luis Fabio Xammer Jurado school, CBMU 303 will provide plumbing repairs, provide running water to the facility, replace a section of the roof and install electrical outlets and ceiling fans throughout the compound.

      At Peru’s Guillermo Billinghurst school, the team will provide electrical, plumbing and roofing repairs in addition to new windows, doors and locks."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 U.S. Troops Begin Humanitarian Mission in Peru contains this description of Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "U.S. Air Force, Army, Marine and Navy service members arrived here Sunday to kick off New Horizons Peru, a U.S. Southern Command-sponsored humanitarian event that will benefit thousands of Peruvians in the Ayacucho area.

      One hundred and thirty-nine members traveled to Ayacucho, an Andean region located in southern Peru, over the weekend to join task force members who arrived throughout late April and May to establish the base camp located outside of Huamanga, Peru.

      The humanitarian mission, scheduled to run through Aug. 31, is an opportunity for the more than 990 U.S. servicemembers and their Peruvian counterparts to assist underprivileged Peruvian communities with expert medical care and robust construction projects while strengthening the bonds of friendship through teamwork and mutual respect.

      The task force is scheduled to construct two schools, three clinics and two water wells. Each new clinic will have the capacity to serve 5,000 Peruvians, and the new schools will have the capacity to seat 120 students. Each new well drilled will provide fresh water for approximately 700 Peruvian citizens.

      More than 15, 000 Peruvians are expected to be cared for by three military medical teams, who will perform three separate medical missions. The teams will offer dentistry, dermatology, gynecology, internal medicine, optometry and pediatrics.

      The New Horizons project will cost approximately $12 million U.S. dollars; including planning, transportation and logistics costs. Three million dollars will be spent on local Peruvian contractors, construction materials, food and other expenses. Additionally, engineers, doctors, nurses, and other support personnel will perform 240,000 man hours to support the humanitarian mission.

      Airmen from the 820th Rapid Engineer Deployable Heavy Operations Repair Squadron Engineer (RED HORSE) Squadron will lead the New Horizons projects with the help of Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, who will contribute their skills in construction, base support and medical operations."
    • The U.S. Southern Command 2008 Boxer Deploys to Latin America for Continuing Promise 2008 says this about Humanitarian and Civic Assistance aid to Peru:
      "USS Boxer (LHD 4) along with various embarked units and non-governmental organizations (NGO) departed Naval Base San Diego April 28 in route to Latin America nations for the Pacific Phase of Continuing Promise (CP) 2008.

      CP is an equal partnership mission designed to combine partner nation and U.S. relief capabilities to demonstrate the lasting bonds and shared interests among neighbors.

      Specific locations for the ship’s relief operations include Guatemala, El Salvador and Peru. The deployment is scheduled to last through June.

      The Humanitarian Civic Assistance (HCA) mission provides partner nations in the U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) area of focus a mobile, flexible and rapidly responsive medical and engineering capability for a number of missions and training opportunities in Central and South America. This is Boxer’s first deployment since returning from the Western Pacific in May of 2007.

      The Pacific Phase of CP is one of two HCA deployments planned for the USSOUTHCOM area of focus for 2008. The second CP deployment will be conducted by USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) in the Caribbean. The deployments are modeled in part on last year’s USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) deployment to the region that delivered substantial medical and dental support to a large number of people in remote locations. Boxer’s deployment is planned with a more robust capability for engineering operations ashore.

      Wasp-class amphibious assault ships like Boxer are designed with a variety of expeditionary mission capabilities, including rapid, projected humanitarian assistance worldwide. It also has the physical capacity to transport large amounts of medical and engineering supplies and equipment to most locations around the globe.

      Boxer’s CP deployment has been coordinated through Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 5 with partner nations in the region and planned hand-in-hand with a variety of governmental and NGOs to creatively address the level and scope of care that will be needed to support regional medical needs. A key objective of this deployment is to address regional health service support requirements and promote clinical information sharing across the region.

      “We are partnering with our neighbors to provide construction capabilities ashore, basic primary health care, dentistry, environmental health care, optometry, biomedical repair, training and even veterinary care,” said Commander of PHIBRON 5, Commodore Peter K. Dallman. “We are also planning to provide a limited number of surgeries on board the ship which is a unique capability that Boxer brings.”

      The embarked Fleet Surgical Team (FST) 5, will work with Latin American medical teams and NGOs in treatment, training and infrastructure support across the host countries.

      Navy Seabee Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 303 will support Boxer and FST 5’s medical mission by bringing robust construction capabilities, civic action repairs and minor construction projects to nations in the region.

      “The variety of training and capabilities Continuing Promise will take into the region clearly demonstrates our nation’s commitment to fostering cooperative partnerships,” said Dallman. “This is a diverse mission that demands a diverse ship and crew. The same flexibility that makes Boxer an effective warship also makes it an extraordinarily effective platform for performing humanitarian assistance missions.”

      “America is a country interested in freedom – our own personal freedom and everyone else’s freedom,” added McCloskey. “We’re a country that’s willing to reach out and help with no strings attached. I want to thank these nations for partnering with us.”

      Embarked units and organizations aboard Boxer for CP include PHIBRON 5, FST 5, CBMU 303, HM 14, HMM 764, TACRON 11, Helicopter Sea Combat Support Squadron 23, Assault Craft Unit 1, Beach Master Unit 1 and other military, government and NGOs."
    • According to the U.S. Southern Command 2008 Seabees begin construction in Trinidad & Tobago for humanitarian exercise, Humanitarian and Civic Assistance will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 74 began construction in Trinidad and Tobago Mar. 25 on a community clinic, the first of several engineering assistance projects planned for New Horizons/Beyond the Horizons (NH/BTH) 2008.

      NH/BTH is a joint engineer, medical and humanitarian civil assistance exercise. This exercise combines training opportunities for U.S. military teams with their civilian counter-parts in a real-world situation with valuable contributions to the communities in Central and South America and the Caribbean. The U.S. training teams include members of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force. The teams work alongside the host nation’s government agencies during the assistance projects.

      Twenty Seabees from Gulfport, Miss. traveled to Trinidad to construct a clinic and do minor repairs. Their first project is a medical clinic at the St. Mary’s Children’s Home.

      NH/BTH 2008 will travel to Honduras, Peru, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago. The engineering projects will include constructing schools and health clinics, making road improvements, and digging water wells. The medical training team will conduct routine surgery and treatments not normally available to the communities.

      U.S. Southern Command sponsored 20 building projects in four nations during NH 2007, including building classrooms, medical clinics, improving rural roads, and dug water wells."
    • According to the U.S. Southern Command 2008 USS Farragut delivers support for Partnership of Americas, Exercises will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "USS Farragut (DDG 99) onloaded eight pallets of Project Handclasp supplies April 3 for donation to several Latin American partner nations during the ship´s deployment for Partnership of the Americas (POA) 2008.

      POA is an annual U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) operation under the operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (NAVSO), SOUTHCOM´s Naval component command. POA focuses on interoperability and theater security cooperation events, at sea and on shore. U.S. maritime forces work jointly with partner nation governmental forces throughout the Caribbean, and Central and South America to develop the relationships needed to ensure maritime security in the region.

      Project Handclasp donations, such as the pallets of toys and medical and hygiene supplies Farragut is carrying, are part of POA 2008, promoting goodwill in the region.

      "Over the last several years, Project Handclasp has become a more prominent part of our mission as we visit and work with our partner nations," said Cmdr. Lewis Preddy, NAVSO Project Handclasp coordinator. "Officers and Sailors onboard deploying ships are loading up with as much of the donated material as they can carry, knowing that during these visits, they can help people who are truly in need."

      Project Handclasp is a Navy sponsored program which collects and distributes a variety of items donated by companies, groups, and individuals. The donations are then transported world-wide by military vessels to regions in need. For the SOUTHCOM area of focus, Project Handclasp supplies are stored at Naval Station Mayport. When ships such as Farragut deploy to the region, they take with them as many pallets as they can to distribute the items to the various places they visit, including Chile, Panama, Peru, and many other partner nations.

      For POA 2008, Farragut, homeported at Naval Station Mayport, will join Carrier Strike Group 8, USS George Washington (CVN 73), Carrier Air Wing 17, USS Kauffman (FFG 59) out of Norfolk; and Destroyer Squadron 40, also based in Mayport. USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98), based in Norfolk, will join up later in the deployment, which is scheduled to last six months."
    • The Department of State 2008 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report says this about aid to Peru:
      "Bilateral Cooperation. The USG continues to support the GOP’s CN operations in the main drug source zones of the UHV and the VRAE, including eradication and interdiction. In 2007 the USG provided assistance to the Basic Training Academies, pre-Academies, and the Advanced Officer Training School. A PNP Canine Training Program was implemented at Santa Lucia with support of U.S. Customs. The canine teams are being trained to detect improvised explosive devices in open fields where eradication and helicopter operations take place. They will also support mobile road interdiction units to detect precursor chemicals, drugs, and money transiting through the source zones. The overarching goal of all these programs is to assist the GOP in increasing state presence and security and to increase operational effectiveness in coca zones. In 2007, the USG also provided maritime interdiction and law enforcement training to the Peruvian Navy and Coast Guard.

      Regional Aerial Interdiction Initiative Program (RAII). In 2005, the GOP and USG signed the Cooperating Nation Information Exchange System (CNIES) Agreement. This enables the USG and other cooperating nations to share intelligence concerning aerial drug trafficking. In 2007, the USG provided CNIES training for Air Force of Peru (FAP) personnel; assisted the FAP establish radar coverage in areas suspected of being aerial trafficking routes; and conducted RAII Joint training exercises with Brazil and Colombia. The FAP C-26s provide critical overhead real time coverage for eradication workers, eradication police, and army personnel in the field through the Forward Looking INFRA-RED Radar (FLIR) also used to map suspected clandestine runways in Peru.

      The Road Ahead. The USG and GOP CN efforts will continue to focus on the core commitments to interdiction, eradication and alternative development, supported by USG aviation assets to reduce net coca cultivation and cocaine production substantially. This will be facilitated in the maritime transit zone by an agreement on Operational Procedures expected to take effect early in 2008. The GOP’s 2007-11 CN strategy reflects this emphasis on control and interdiction of precursor chemicals, drug seizures, reduction in coca cultivation, enforcement of money-laundering laws, reduction of drug use and improvement of economic conditions to reduce dependency on coca cultivation.

      As an integral part of the of the CN strategy, effective interdiction is dependent on the GOP’s ability to put a sufficient number of trained police personnel into the coca-growing regions. The GOP will continue to strengthen CN police presence east of the Andes by training 3,200 new police cadets by early 2009, thereby helping improve security and stem drug flows at air and seaports. Basic and specialized courses will continue at the three PNP Basic Training Academies and a new canine training site will be constructed at two additional locations. Specialized US-based training, i.e. pilot, aircrew and maintenance training, will also be necessary to enhance the capacity of the PNP and further the nationalization of the aviation support program.

      USG CN efforts also require the continuation of the Alternative Development Program, which directly supports the interdiction and eradication programs by providing options to coca cultivation and discouraging replanting, and sustaining eradication gains. The USG will work with NGOs, universities and the media to sustain an counternarcotics and education campaign and to expand presence and influence in coca-growing regions. Continued strong political will and the commitment of CN resources by the GOP are fundamental to their success."
    • According to the Department of State 2009 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations, the U.S. government will fund the following activities in Peru:
      "The United States will strengthen infrastructure and provide training for Government of Peru (GOP) institutions in coca-producing zones. Programs will focus on eradication, interdiction, and alternative development. Assistance also will help the GOP enforce money laundering laws, reduce drug use and improve economic conditions to reduce dependency on coca cultivation. Moreover, funds will be allocated to help the GOP improve its capability to participate in peacekeeping operations. Through quality military education, U.S. programs will improve professionalism in the military and encourage civilian control, respect for human rights, military justice reform, and better management of defense resources."
    • The Department of State 2009 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations says this about International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement aid to Peru:
      "Highlights: To support efforts to eliminate the illicit drug industry, including subversive groups working with drug traffickers; eradicate coca in new zones where it has spread; maintain training for anti-drug units; improve controls at ports and airports; and prevent major trafficking organizations from regaining a foothold."