Country Snapshot:

Honduras

Area in square km: 112,090
Defense expenditure as percentage of GDP (2010): 1.13%
Defense expenditure in dollars (2010): 17,194,128
Per capita GDP in dollars (2009): 4,100
Population (2010): 7,989,415
Size of armed forces (2010): 8,566
Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index ranking (2010): 134 (out of 178)
U.S. military personnel present (2009): 416

U.S. Aid to Honduras, All Programs, 2010-2015

Advanced Search

Show aid and sales between
and

by



Grant military and police aid to Honduras, All Programs, 2010-2015

Aid Program201020112012201320142015Program Total
Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance2,357,0006,260,0006,147,0006,147,0006,147,00027,058,000
Foreign Military Financing1,514,000998,0001,000,0002,848,0002,848,0003,100,00012,308,000
Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance2,240,0002,089,0002,089,0002,089,0008,507,000
International Military Education and Training777,000765,000774,000626,000626,000750,0004,318,000
Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program175,045367,466237,271237,271237,2711,254,324
Service Academies143,438312,25571,08771,08771,087668,954
Non-Security Assistance - Unified Command148,974148,974
Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority35,08235,08235,08235,082140,328
Aviation Leadership Program39,27031,05331,05331,053132,429
Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies34,50050,6004,7604,7604,76099,380
Misc Dept of State / Dept of Defense Non-Security Assistance2,5002,500
Global Peace Operations Initiative0
TOTAL5,152,45711,067,67310,389,25312,089,25312,089,2533,850,00054,637,889

All amounts in U.S. dollars. Numbers in italics are estimates, usually based on the closest year for which data are available.

Grant economic and social aid to Honduras, All Programs, 2010-2015

Aid Program201020112012201320142015Program Total
Development Assistance37,491,00042,266,00046,266,00044,428,00044,428,00044,326,000259,205,000
Child Survival and Health12,000,00011,988,0009,000,0003,578,0003,578,00040,144,000
Defense Department Humanitarian Assistance1,470,000198,0252,975,5792,975,5792,975,57910,594,762
Millennium Challenge3,500,0003,500,000
TOTAL54,461,00054,452,02558,241,57950,981,57950,981,57944,326,000313,443,762

All amounts in U.S. dollars. Numbers in italics are estimates, usually based on the closest year for which data are available.

All Grant Aid to Honduras, All Programs, 2010-2015

201020112012201320142015TOTAL
TOTAL59,613,45765,519,69868,630,83263,070,83263,070,83248,176,000368,081,651

Military and Police Trainees from Honduras, All Programs, 2010-2015

Aid Program201020112012Program Total
International Military Education and Training94193172459
Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies45760112
Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance11252359
Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program1311244
Non-Security Assistance - Unified Command3838
Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority3030
Global Peace Operations Initiative1313
Foreign Military Sales88
Foreign Military Financing88
Service Academies2417
Aviation Leadership Program112
TOTAL191299290780

U.S. Institutions that Trained Personnel from Honduras, All Programs, 2010-2015 (Max. 20 Shown)

Institution2010Total
N/A9525
Inter-American Air Forces Academy1616
Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation1010
Defense Language Institute English Language Center44
Air Force Academy22
United States Military Academy22
National Defense University22
Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School (NAVSCIATTS)11
Army Command and General Staff College11
TOTAL6363

Arms and Equipment Sold to Honduras, All Programs, 2010-2015

Program20102011Program Total
Direct Commercial Sales651,8431,390,675,9581,391,327,801
Foreign Military Sales117,000544,000661,000
TOTAL768,8431,391,219,9581,391,988,801

All amounts in U.S. dollars.

Official Descriptions of Aid to Honduras

American Forces Press Service, 2012

Document: SOUTHCOM, partners prepare to respond to natural disasters

Program: Humanitarian Assistance, Humanitarian and Civic Assistance

SOUTHCOM is collaborating with regional partners to increase their ability to prepare for and respond to natural disasters. Fraser described a three-part effort through SOUTHCOM's humanitarian assistance program, disaster preparedness projects and annual humanitarian assistance exercises.

Last year, those efforts included building disaster-response warehouses, wells, potable water systems and emergency operations centers, he said. In fiscal year 2011, SOUTHCOM also conducted 169 projects designed to increase disaster preparedness in Central America, South America and the Caribbean.

In addition, the command supports the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency, a regional effort to increase disaster resilience and response capabilities among the 18 Caribbean nations involved.

A new project SOUTHCOM sponsored in the wake of the Haiti earthquake involves forward-staged kits that provide disaster-response teams with essential services, including potable water, hybrid renewable power, communications and situational awareness.

"Past experience has demonstrated that one of the biggest challenges in providing an effective response is the ability to accurately assess the situation on the ground after communications go down and transportation infrastructure has been damaged or destroyed," Fraser noted in his commander's blog.

Pre-positioned Expeditionary Assistance Kits, or PEAKS, developed in partnership with the National Defense University, "enable decision makers to gain a better understanding of how best to deploy relief efforts," he said.

The kits underwent a joint capability technology demonstration last year at Soto Cono Air Base, Honduras, less than a year after the program's inception, Fraser said. Joint Task Force-Bravo in Honduras, SOUTHCOM's main expeditionary organization, and members of Honduras' military and civil-relief agencies, put the kits to the test under realistic field conditions.

Meanwhile, Fraser emphasized the importance of training to ensure the SOUTHCOM staff is prepared to support USAID, the lead federal agency for international disaster response, if called upon. This includes a joint operations course it hosts, with classes presented by USAID.

Department of State, 2011

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

With input from the United States and UNDP, the Government of Honduras presented an Integrated Policy for Social Harmony and Citizen Safety on September 7, 2011. The document outlines three focal points: violence prevention with an emphasis on human rights; police capacity building; and community and business involvement in localized security plans.

The United States provided assistance to Honduras for citizen security, counternarcotics, law enforcement, and the rule of law initiatives that build the capacity of Honduran law enforcement, military, development, and justice sector institutions. The United States focused on building partnerships between governments, civil society, the private sector, and the international community.

Among other items, United States program activities included provision of technical assistance, training, equipment, and logistics support for counternarcotics units, such as provision of cell phones for vetted units; training and equipment to combat gang activities; technical assistance and equipment to improve prison management; support for the Honduran police investigative school; and mentoring by U.S. advisors for improved prosecution of crimes.

The United States counters the inroads of gangs and drug traffickers including a mix of policy initiatives, municipal crime prevention efforts, and community services for youth at risk. For example, the United States established 25 Outreach Centers in urban high-crime neighborhoods. The centers are safe places to play and learn vocational skills; 400 local volunteers mentor 7,500 youth and children. Honduras managed its activities in close cooperation with the United States through a cabinet-level Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI) Bilateral Task Force, co-chaired by the Ambassador and the President of Honduras, which convened quarterly.

U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Defense, 2009

Document: Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010

Honduras is a close partner of the United States in Central America, with traditionally strong mil-mil ties. International Military Education and Training (IMET)-funded training is geared towards Professional Military Education (PME) courses that encourage continued improvement in civil-military relations, as well as improvement in the democratic climate and regional integration/stability. Training at all levels, from Non-Commissioned Officer (NCO) professional development up to Command and Staff and War Colleges, as well as courses on civil-military relations and participation in the Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) program, helps reinforce the notion of civilian control of the military and promotes the principles of human rights. Following the Lobo government's removal of the Defense Minister and senior Honduran military officials linked to the coup and the de facto regime, the United States has started to re-engage with the Honduran military and provide military assistance. Our assistance to, and reengagement with the Honduran military is being undertaken in a deliberate and focused manner to ensure that the promotion of civilian control over an apolitical military and respect by the military for human rights and constitutional order in Honduras. Our assistance and engagement focuses on military professionalization and transformation, countering illicit trafficking and combating terrorism, and assisting the military to improve its capacity to conduct humanitarian assistance/disaster relief missions and participate in peacekeeping operations.

Training in international peacekeeping will allow the Honduran armed forces to more fully develop expertise in this area and to participate in future Peacekeeping Operations (PKO). Honduras is also one of the members of the Conferencia de Fuerzas Armadas Centroamericanas (CFAC) PKO battalion, primarily funded through Global Peace Operations Initiative (GPOI). This key initiative will provide new peacekeepers and peacekeeping units to deploy in support of global PKOs.

Because of its geographic location along illicit trafficking routes, Honduras has become a transshipment point for narcotics entering the United States. Training in counternarcotics operations, resource management, logistics and equipment maintenance, and participation in exercises with U.S. forces provides opportunities needed to professionalize and modernize the Honduran military and encourage its continued cooperation with U.S. Counternarcotics (CN) efforts. Honduras is a partner in the Enduring Friendship (EF) initiative, which seeks to increase control over the waterways of the Caribbean by building maritime security capabilities for partner nations. EF supports the President's Western Hemisphere Strategy, the Proliferation Security Initiative, and the Command's Theater Security Cooperation Strategy.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the United States welcomes participation from Honduras at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses. These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations, and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Honduras.

U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Defense, 2008

Document: Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2008 and 2009

Honduras is a democratic country and a close partner of the United States in Central America, with traditionally strong mil- mil ties. International Military Education and Training (IMET)-funded training is geared towards Professional Military Education (PME) courses that encourage continued improvement in civil-military relations, as well as improvement in the democratic climate and regional integration/stability. Training at all levels, from Non-Commissioned Officer (NCO) professional development up to Command and Staff and War Colleges, as well as courses on civil-military relations and participation in the Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) program, helps reinforce the notion of civilian control of the military and promotes the principles of human rights.

Training in international peacekeeping will allow the Honduran armed forces to more fully develop expertise in this area and to participate in future Peacekeeping Operations (PKO). Honduras is also one of the members of the Conferencia de Fuerzas Armadas Centroamericanas (CFAC) PKO battalion, primarily funded through Global Peace Operations Initiative (GPOI). This key initiative will provide new peacekeepers and peacekeeping units to deploy in support of global PKOs.

Because of its geographic location along illicit trafficking routes, Honduras has become a transshipment point for narcotics entering the United States. Training in counternarcotics operations, resource management, logistics and equipment maintenance, and participation in exercises with U.S. forces provides opportunities needed to professionalize and modernize the Honduran military and encourage its continued cooperation with U.S. Counternarcotics (CN) efforts. Honduras is a partner in the Enduring Friendship (EF) initiative, which seeks to increase control over the waterways of the Caribbean by building maritime security capabilities for partner nations. EF supports the President's Western Hemisphere Strategy, the Proliferation Security Initiative, and the Command's Theater Security Cooperation Strategy.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the United States welcomes participation from Honduras at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses. These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations, and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Honduras.

U.S. Department of State, 2008

Document: 2008 End-Use Monitoring Report

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

TEGUCIGALPA

Background

EUM Program Coordinator
Gregory Morrison, Tel: 504-236-9320 ext. 4394, morrisongrstate.gov

Inventory System
To identify and track donated equipment, post enters every item or service into the NAS office Access database, identifying its location, value, recipient, donation date, and full description.

Staff EUM Monitoring Responsibilities
Lourdes Guillen, NAS Training Specialist, is responsible for conducting on-site inspections, communicating with the different recipient agencies to be aware of any problem of achievement, and preparing the EUM report. Cynthia Licona, Admin Assistant, provides support when needed.

Other U.S. Agency Assistance
The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) conducts reviews to verify the condition and use of resources provided to the Vetted unit.

Counterpart Agencies
The following Directorate and units from the Honduran National Police (HNP) are recipients of USG-provided assets:
National Direction of Special Services Investigation (DNSEI)
National Direction of Criminal Investigation (DNIC)
National Direction of Special Preventive Service (DNSEP)
National Direction of Preventive Police (DNPP)
Joint Information Communication Center (CEINCO)
Division Against Abuse Trafficking, and Sexual Exploitation of Internal Affairs (IA)

The following offices at the Public Ministry (PM) are also recipients of USG- provided assets:
Organized Crime Unit (OCU)
Human Rights Prosecution Office
Unit for Causes of Foreign Citizens

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections
During 2008, six counterpart sites and six cities were visited. A total of 662 items were subject to inspection. Sixty percent (60%) of the donated items were physically inspected. On-site inspections are conducted at different check point locations, border crossings, and police headquarters units to monitor donations. Three scheduled and five unscheduled inspections were performed.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status
Discussions were held with host government officials to check on the status of INL-funded resources at the following counterpart sites: DNSEI Tegucigalpa Headquarters, DNSEI north western region. The communications equipment donated for the National Automated Case Management Information System (NACMIS) was verified with the officer-in-charge. About forty (40) percent of donated items were monitored using secondary methods.

Status-Commodities

Vehicles
Two Chevrolet pickups and one Chevrolet Blazer were donated to DSEI Tegucigalpa headquarters in 2003, one Chevrolet van in 2004, and one Jeep Cherokee in 2006. They are being used to support different units of the Police Directorate in their regular day-to-day work.

The Special Vetted Unit project maintains possession of three Ford Ranger pickups and one Chevrolet pickup donated in 2005. They are used to carry out monitoring, surveillance, and seizures. Two are not in working condition, and two are in fair condition. At the end of 2008, a donation letter for the transfer of two Ford Exployers was signed. Vehicles will be in the possession of the GOH once the process of transfer of ownership is completed.

One vehicle was donated to the Police Intelligence Project in 2005. This vehicle is used by members of the Polygraph Unit that conducts polygraph tests in different locations nationwide. The vehicles are in good condition.

Eight motorcycles were donated to the Border Control Interdiction Unit (DNSEI) in 2004. Five were assigned to the headquarters in Tegucigalpa and three to the Guasaule border crossing and the Pavana checkpoint. Motorcycles are used to support different units of the Police Directorate, and transport Frontier Police personnel within different checkpoints. One was stolen while on duty; two are not in working condition; and five are in fair condition.

Border Control Interdiction (DNSEI)
Pickup
2
SUV
1
Van
1
SUV
2
Motorcycle
7

Special Vetted Unit
Ford Ranger
3
Chevrolet Pickup
1
Ford Exployer
2

Vessels
Four boats donated to the Border Control/Interdiction (DNSEI) in 2003 are irreparable and need to be removed from inventory.

Communications Equipment
In 2006, communications equipment devices (e.g. dual bands, Tripp lutes, catalyst switches, patch panels) were donated to the HNP as part of the National Automated Case Management Information System (NACMIS) project. Phase II of the plan called "interconnectivity of Information/systems-remote Access" began in 2007 and was completed in 2008 with the installation, configuration, and testing of all devices and data transmission equipment that are part of the project expansion. Additional switches, and another 13 units of the Department of the Ministry of Security located nationwide were connected. NACMIS is used by different units of the Department of the Ministry of Security and the main investigations to access criminal files, arrest warrants, stolen vehicles, and weapons registration among others.

Four portable radios were provided to the Panama Checkpoint (DNSEI) in 2005. Radios were not working due to flaws in the antenna of the company that provides the service. Six portable radios were provided in 2005 to the Guassaule Border Crossing (DNSEI), Radios were working properly and being used to coordinate efforts to interdict and report smuggling of goods and people from Nicaragua. Six portable radios were donated to DNSEI in 2008; two were assigned to el Amarillo Border Crossing; and four to the Pavana checkpoint. Out of these four, two are not working and the rest are in good condition. They are being used for the police officers on duty during shifts.

Twenty-five radios, including antennas and three base consoles were provided to DNSEP; and were assigned to the National Penitentiary located in Tamaa; ten to the prison in San Pedro Sula, and five to the prison in Juticalpa. All radios are in excellent condition and are used for the prison guards to be in permanent communications within the prisons.

Communications Equipment
Thirteen desktop computers and three printers were provided to the Organized Crime Unit (OCU) in 2005. Two computers were destroyed in a fire two years ago, and the rest of the equipment is in fair condition. Four desktop computers, four printers, and one scanner were provided to the Human Rights Prosecution Office in 2006. This equipment is used to carry out its administrative work. The equipment is in good condition.

DNIC received two desktop computers, two printers, one scanner, three internal hard drives, and four Dell modules for Power Edge in 2006, and two Dell servers, and one software ISA server in 2008. The equipment is being used to increase the storage capability of information. Equipment donated in 2006 is in good condition, and the one donated in 2008 is in excellent condition.

The TIP Unit at DNSEI was provided with fifteen desktop computers, four laptops, fifteen printers, four scanners, three printers, and three copy machines in 2005; four printers in 2006; four wireless cards and one wireless router in 2007. The equipment is used to investigate TIP cases. The status of the equipment donated in 2005 shows that one laptop is missing; all printers are no longer functioning and rest is in good condition. Computer equipment donated in 2006 and 2007 are also in good condition. Two desktop computers, with sound amplification systems donated to DARESI in 2006 are in fair condition and are used to keep records of TIP cases and conduct training. The Preventive Police Office located in Bay Ireland was provided with two digital cameras and one video camera in 2008. These cameras are used for surveillance. The equipment is in excellent condition.

One laptop, two desktops and one printer were provided to the Pavana Checkpoint in 2006; three digital cameras, three camcorders and three digital media recorders were provided in 2008. The equipment is used to keep a better control of vehicles and people passing through this important checkpoint. The condition of the equipment donated in 2006 is good and the status of the equipment donated in 2008 is excellent. One desktop computer and one printer were donated to the Guasaule Border Crossing in 2006. This equipment is used to keep records; its condition is good. El Amatillo Border Crossing was provided with two desktop computers, one laptop and two laptop batteries in 2007. The equipment has the NACMIS installed and is being used to verify information. The status of this equipment is good. Border crossings and checkpoints located in the northwestern region received two laptops, five desktops, seven printers, nine DVD camcorders, nine digital cameras, two digital media records, and thee binoculars in 2008. The equipment is used for border control and interdiction operations. This equipment is in excellent condition.

During 2006, the polygraph unit at CEINCIO was provided with three MP3 players, four laptops with OEM software, two printers, one fax, and one scanner. The equipment is used to conduct polygraph tests at the request of different units of the National Honduran Police. Equipment is in good condition. CEINCO received two voice recorders, two camcorders, one digital cameo, and three USB' in 2006; two laptops iBase Designer software, Analyst's Notebook, one tower sever, three digital cameras, one multimedia projector, one projection screen and one DVD player were donated in 2007. The equipment is used to collect and analyze information related to organized crime, especially drug trafficking. All equipment is working properly and is in good condition.

Four desktop computers, four printers, four scanners, four digital cameras, and one router were provided to the Joint Task Force in 2008. This task force is formed by different units of the Honduran National Police. It is located at the International Airport. The equipment is used for registration control of suspect passengers and is in excellent condition.

Miscellaneous Equipment
The Ion scanner transferred to the DEA in 2007 has not been repaired.

A metal detector was donated to the DNSEP in 2008. It is located In the Juticlpa Prison. It is used for inspection of visitors. The machine is in excellent condition.

The following additional equipment was provided to DNSEP in 2008: one water pump, mattresses, footlockers were provided to the Central Penal Sanpedrano; one water pump, mattress, footlocker, and tactical gloves were provided to the Juticalpa prison; one water pump mattress, foolockers and tactical gloves were provided to the Penitenciaria Marco Aurelio Goto. The equipment was provided to improve the living conditions of the prison guards.

Status-Services

Construction Projects
A vehicle inspection ramp at the Pavana checkpoint was built in 2007. This ramp is being used by the Frontier Police to thoroughly inspect the undercarriage of the vehicles.

Communication towers were completed in the following locations:
Parana
Puerto Cortes
El Durazno

Demand Reduction Services
Combat TIP, through training, sensitizing government officials and other stockholders about Trafficking-in-Persons, particularly of adult women international Organization for Migration (IOM) is building capacity to assist victims of trafficking funded with a grant. Through a grant, Catholic Relief Services (CRS) is raising awareness about human trafficking prevention in key border and urban areas of Honduras.

A grant was implemented with Federacion de Organizaciones ara el Desarrollo de Honduras to promote academic tutoring, formation of civil and ethical values, skills and community service among youth that are or have been gang members.

Other Professional Services
A review and reform of the curriculum of the National Police Academy, improves the professionalism of the police through specialized courses.

Program Impact

Communications Equipment
The installation of NACMIS in more police stations around the country has connected HNP units in real time with main offices of the DNIC. Most of the kidnappings solved by the police in the North Region of Honduras were achieved with the information achieved from NACMIS. The first day NACMIS was installed in one of the police posts covering the main exit roads of Tegucigalpa, four individuals that had arrest warrants were captured. Over 23 million records can be accessed for criminal investigations.

Computer Equipment
Computer equipment donated to CEINCO and its Polygraph Unit assisted them in conducting 471 polygraph tests on members of the HNP and applicants to the National Police Academy in 2008. The equipment provided to the Joint Task Force located in Toncont International Airport led to verification of intelligence. Two million dollars in cash was seized as a result. Laptops provided to the different border crossings and checkpoints have the NASMIS installed and are used daily in road operations leading to the arrest of many individuals that have arrests warrants. With the equipment provided to DATESI, 17, 200 people including police prosecutors, judges and children from schools were trained against abuse, trafficking, and sexual exploitation in 2008.

Vehicles
The Vetted Unit vehicles were used in surveillance and monitoring of several people, which helped collect intelligence information, resulting in significant seizures of drugs and chemical precursors.

Construction Services
At the vehicle inspection ramp located in Pavana, an average of 70 vehicles per week are checked. One of the most recent results was the seizure of $26,000 that was found in the left door panel of a pickup. Without the communication towers, information sharing in real time would not be possible.

Demand Reduction Services
A Protocol for Repatriation of children and adolescent victims vulnerable to Trafficking in Persons was presented. The National Police, the Public Ministry, the Direction of Migration and Civil Society are taking steps forward to combat TIP.

Professional Services
A Police Academy Adviser developed a diagnosis of the General Direction of Police Education. Advice was provided to all directors of the different police training centers, and a standardization curriculum was proposed. Furthermore, 351 Honduran police officers were trained in specialized areas, such as crime scene investigation, police ethics, crisis management, organized crime and drug trafficking, police intervention, operational planning and domestic violence.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Unmonitored resources
Due to staff shortages, not all items donated in prior years could be inspected in 2008. Some items are being used by law enforcement in the field. Communication with the different recipient agencies is constant and any problem or achievement is immediately reported.

Lack of Use of Commodities
While conducting a visit to Penitenciaria Nacional Marco Aurelio Soto, mattresses donated for the prison guards were not being used because the windows of the barracks had no glass, and rain frequently flooded the entire room. The NAS spoke with the prison authorities who pledged to make the necessary arrangements. Subsequent exterior inspections show that glass was installed in the window.

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities
The lack of a budget to maintain and repair vehicles and equipment such as computers and printers continues to be a problem for the HNP. In many cases, equipment is being used in remote, undeveloped tropical locations which accelerate deterioration. Electrical supply is often poor, causing premature wear and tear on electrical devices. Such conditions are unavoidable and out of post's control. Representatives in the field express great appreciation for the donations but post needs to secure buy-in from the leadership and ensure they make the hard budgeting decisions needed to maintain the donations.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs The USG focus in Honduras is to address key challenges to security and law enforcement that affect both Honduras and the United States such as interdiction of drugs flowing through Honduras by air, sea or land, and the lack of public security because of gang-related and other organized crime. Bilateral Cooperation. In 2009, there was improved communication and coordination between U.S. law enforcement and intelligence entities (DEA and JIATF-S), and Honduran military and National Police elements reacting to narcotics air and maritime shipments. The USG funded construction of the Naval Base in Barra de Caratasca in 2009 and is scheduled to begin construction of a naval facility on the island of Guanaja (as soon as the political situation allows). A marked improvement in Honduran expertise using the Cooperating Nations Information Exchange System (CNIES), particularly on the part of the Honduran Navy, accounted for a great deal of the enhanced response. Additionally, the enhancement of a steady state response capability through the U.S. Southern Command, JIATF-S, and Joint Task Force Bravo Central Skies II program added a more timely and robust interdiction capability for the Honduran Tactical Response Team (TRT), which worked closely with the DEA. However, since the June 28 coup, the interdiction success rate decreased considerably as a result of the reassignment of security forces by the de facto regime to counter political unrest. Cooperation with Honduras via the bilateral maritime agreement remained strong in 2009. Under the agreement, the U.S. Coast Guard interdicted four Honduran flagged vessels, detained 24 suspected smugglers, and removed over 4.3 metric tons of cocaine. Drug trafficking organizations utilized Honduran flagged vessels in the transit zone to smuggle contraband, and several interdictions in countries along the transit zones involved Honduran crewmembers. The bilateral agreement with Honduras is a key element in the ability of USG interdiction assets to effectively deter drug trafficking organizations in the Western Caribbean.

U.S. Department of State, 2010

Document: Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Program and Budget Guide, Fiscal Year 2010

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators Enhance the abilities of the Government of Honduras (GOH) law enforcement agencies to detect and intercept shipments and detain traffickers.

  • Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs and contraband seized.
  • Increased number of arrests of drug traffickers and money launderers.
Improve GOH ability to prevent gang crime through improved policing.
  • Decreased gang-related crime.
Reform management of prisons to separate out youthful offenders and prevent prison-based crime.
  • Consistent implementation of prison management reforms and procedures.
Program Justification Honduras's geographic location makes it a transit point for increased narcotics trafficking through Central America and Mexico to the United States. While Honduras is increasing the number of police, and revamping its academy with U.S. assistance, it still does not have adequate police resources, and existing forces are inadequately trained and equipped. This contributes to Honduras's inability to interdict the transshipment of drugs or to address the increase in violence fueled by gangs. Honduras also requires country-specific assistance to anti-gang units to complement the regional training provided under the regional gangs program. Honduras's two major cities are wracked by gang-related violence, and authorities only marginally control prisons where gang members are incarcerated. Program Accomplishments In 2008 the GOH seized 6.5 metric tons (MT) of cocaine, including seizures made from Honduran vessels in international waters by the U.S. Coast Guard. The GOH also seized 2 kilograms (kg) of crack cocaine, 19.6 kg of heroin, over 3 MT of processed marijuana, 3.5 million pseudoephedrine pills, and over five tons of precursors (sodium sulphate and soda ash). An additional 13 MT of pseudoephedrine were seized in the United States en route to Honduras to be diverted to Mexican drug cartels. In conjunction with these seizures 721 people were arrested. This represents an increase in seizures and arrests over 2007. In 2008, authorities also seized $4.3 million in cash and $6.7 million in total assets as a result of joint operations with the USG. As part of a plan to improve the National Police, the force added 2,000 police officers. Honduras is implementing a number of the curriculum reform recommendations for the police academy made by an INL-funded consultant, leveraging funding from other sources. While there is still much to do, Honduras is also taking steps to control gang-related violence by identifying training and prevention programs, including work with corrections institutions and instituting a system of citizen roundtables to address security issues in communities. FY 2010 Program Interdiction This project will increase the capabilities of the police to interdict drugs, arms and other contraband at Honduran borders by providing additional radios for improved communications at border crossings and ports of entry, including airports and to establish communication links to the under-patrolled eastern portion of Honduras. The project will also fund improvements to stationary inspection facilities and additional mobile housing trailers to enhance police presence at crossings and checkpoints, as well as additional training for the inspection units. As the majority of the trafficking occurs in isolated areas, we will provide support for training, transportation and inspection equipment, such as computers, computers, crime reporting software, and cameras. The project will also fund computer equipment and software for the funding to the Police Intelligence Center (CEINCO) to increase the volume, speed and accuracy of intake, processing, and dissemination of criminal data to provide real time information and analysis to law enforcement units throughout Honduras and to communicate with partner centers in the region. With the passage of the Organic Police Reform Law, police officers will be subject to polygraph exams and funds will support training and equipment to qualify officers to administer polygraph exams. Funds will also continue training for prosecutors in investigation and procedures in an effort to raise conviction rates for criminals engaged in violent crimes. Gangs The program will support Honduras-specific equipment, training and prevention activities in conjunction with the Regional Gangs program and Merida activities, such as the FBI-assisted anti gang units. Honduras is ramping up in-country activities by hosting an assistant to the regional program and a regional prisons training advisor based in Tegucigalpa. A prevention/community policing program is being established on the outskirts of San Pedro 304 FY 2010 INL Program and Budget Guide Sula. Specific areas of funding are investigative equipment for police, including additional mobile stations to acquire fingerprints for the regional system; equipment such as radios and key control systems for corrections officers in gang-controlled prisons; and providing office supplies, computers and support for a telephone tip line for the new community policing program. Public security is also increasingly threatened by kidnappings for ransom, usually by gang members. Project funds will provide technical assistance to the police for investigations and prevention activities related to kidnapping.

U.S. Southern Command, 2009

Document: U.S. Army Leads Multinational Peacekeeping Exercise in Guatemala

Program: Exercises

The U.S. Army is working hand-in-hand with the Central American Armed Forces Conference to enhance stability and cooperation throughout the region with their annual Peace Keeping Operations Exercise here.

The current three-week-long exercise consists of various training venues and culminates with a final command-post exercise Aug. 15-17 where students will get a chance to put into practice all the information and skills they learned during the annual Peace Keeping Operations Exercise

This is the third and final phase of annual exercises designed specifically for this region.

The conference, known as CFAC, is comprised of The Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Honduras and was established approximately a decade ago.

This annual exercise equips CFAC troops with the knowledge and tools to effectively execute peacekeeping missions and respond to natural disasters, within United Nations standards, throughout the region.

During this 16-day phase, a class consisting of 86 students representing the various countries, learn everything from convoy and security operations to medical evacuation and public affairs procedures all within United Nations guidelines.

The exercise took approximately 3 months of coordination and planning and the team is already looking to plan future exercises, said Kempf. “Next year, the focus country will be Chile, and in 2011, it will be in Brazil.”

The overall goal is to enhance interoperability and improve security and cooperation of the people in the region

U.S. Southern Command, 2009

Document: Honduras-based U.S. Army Helicopters Deploy to Nicaragua in Support of Humanitarian Mission

Program: Humanitarian and Civic Assistance

The mission of the Joint Task Force-Bravo helicopters will be to transport patients, some from remote areas, to sites in the vicinity of Corinto to receive free medical care and surgical screenings from Comfort’s medical personnel. The helicopters are scheduled to remain in Nicaragua for the duration of the two-week mission.
...
To date, the Continuing Promise teams have treated nearly 70,000 patients, provided health care education to thousands of people and immunized thousands of animals.

U.S. Southern Command, 2009

Document: U.S., Honduran Military Members Conduct Combined Jump Training

Program: Exercises

Nearly 200 U.S. Army and Honduran paratroopers and 10 U.S. Air Force aircrew members teamed up to complete combined jump training over the drop zone here May 16.

For the U.S. Soldiers and Airmen, it was an opportunity to train side-by-side with a partner nation and learn about their methods and procedures. For the majority of the Honduran "paracaidistas" -- or paratroopers -- the effort marked their first jump and the completion of a final prerequisite before they graduate from jump school.

More >>

Grant Aid Table Sources:

  • Honduras Foreign Military Financing 2010; - U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Foreign Military Sales, Foreign Military Construction Sales and Other Security Cooperation Historical Facts As of September 30, 2010 (Washington: DSCA, 2011) (Link to source).
  • Honduras International Military Education and Training 2010; - United States, Department of State, FY 2012 Executive Budget Summary Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: Department of State, February 2011) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Misc Dept of State / Dept of Defense Non-Security Assistance 2010; - Estimate based on closest available year.
  • Honduras ; - Clare Ribando Seelke, Liana Sun Wyler, June S. Beittel, Mark P. Sullivan, 'Latin America and the Caribbean: Illicit Drug Trafficking and U.S. Counterdrug Programs' (Washington: U.S. Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, May 12, 2011): 33-4 (Link to source).
  • Honduras Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2010; Honduras Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2010; Honduras Non-Security Assistance - Unified Command 2010; Honduras Service Academies 2010; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011 (Washington: February 2012) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Foreign Military Financing 2011; Honduras International Military Education and Training 2011; - United States, Department of State, FY 2013 Executive Budget Summary - Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: February 13, 2012) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2011; Honduras Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance 2011; - U.S. Department of Defense, Section 1209 and Section 1203(b) Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: Department of Defense, October 2012): (Link to source).
  • Honduras Foreign Military Financing 2012; Honduras International Military Education and Training 2012; - United States, Department of State, FY 2014 Executive Budget Summary - Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: April 10, 2013) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2012; Honduras Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance 2012; - U.S. Department of Defense, Section 1209 of the NDAA for FY2008 (Public Law 110-181) Report to Congress on Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Year 2012 (Washington: Department of Defense, May 2013): (Link to source).
  • Honduras Aviation Leadership Program 2011; Honduras Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2011; Honduras Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2011; Honduras Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority 2011; Honduras Service Academies 2011; Honduras Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority 2012; Honduras Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority 2013; Honduras Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority 2014; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2012 (Washington: December 2012) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Foreign Military Financing 2013; - United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) <(Link to source).
  • Honduras Aviation Leadership Program 2012; Honduras Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2012; Honduras Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2012; Honduras Global Peace Operations Initiative 2012; Honduras Service Academies 2012; Honduras Aviation Leadership Program 2013; Honduras Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2013; Honduras Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2013; Honduras Global Peace Operations Initiative 2013; Honduras Service Academies 2013; Honduras Aviation Leadership Program 2014; Honduras Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2014; Honduras Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2014; Honduras Global Peace Operations Initiative 2014; Honduras Service Academies 2014; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013 (Washington: October 2013) (Link to source).
  • Honduras International Military Education and Training 2013; Honduras Foreign Military Financing 2015; Honduras International Military Education and Training 2015; - United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2013; Honduras Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance 2013; Honduras Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2014; Honduras Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance 2014; -
  • Honduras Foreign Military Financing 2014; Honduras International Military Education and Training 2014; - Based on 2013 actual figures due to 2014 continuing resolution. United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) (Link to source).

Economic Aid Table Sources:

  • Honduras Child Survival and Health 2010; Honduras Development Assistance 2010; - United States, Department of State, FY 2012 Executive Budget Summary Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: Department of State, February 2011) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Defense Department Humanitarian Assistance 2010; - U.S. Department of Defense, Section 1209 and Section 1203b Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Years 2008, 2009, and 2010 Washington: Department of Defense, April 2012 (Link to source).
  • Honduras Millennium Challenge 2010; - United States, Millennium Challenge Corporation, Honduras: Compact-Eligible Country Report (Washington: MCC, November 2007) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Defense Department Humanitarian Assistance 2011; Honduras Defense Department Humanitarian Assistance 2012; - U.S. Department of Defense, Section 1209 and Section 1203(b) Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: Department of Defense, October 2012): (Link to source).
  • Honduras Child Survival and Health 2011; Honduras Development Assistance 2011; - United States, Department of State, FY 2013 Executive Budget Summary - Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: February 13, 2012) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Child Survival and Health 2012; Honduras Development Assistance 2012; - United States, Department of State, FY 2014 Executive Budget Summary - Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: April 10, 2013) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Defense Department Humanitarian Assistance 2013; Honduras Defense Department Humanitarian Assistance 2014; -
  • Honduras Child Survival and Health 2013; Honduras Development Assistance 2013; Honduras Development Assistance 2015; - United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Child Survival and Health 2014; Honduras Development Assistance 2014; - Based on 2013 actual figures due to 2014 continuing resolution. United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) (Link to source).

Trainees Table Sources:

  • Honduras Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2010; Honduras Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2010; Honduras Global Peace Operations Initiative 2010; Honduras International Military Education and Training 2010; Honduras Non-Security Assistance - Unified Command 2010; Honduras Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2010; Honduras Service Academies 2010; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011 (Washington: February 2012) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Aviation Leadership Program 2011; Honduras Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2011; Honduras Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2011; Honduras Foreign Military Financing 2011; Honduras International Military Education and Training 2011; Honduras Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2011; Honduras Section 1206 Train and Equip Authority 2011; Honduras Service Academies 2011; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2012 (Washington: December 2012) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Aviation Leadership Program 2012; Honduras Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2012; Honduras Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2012; Honduras Foreign Military Sales 2012; Honduras Global Peace Operations Initiative 2012; Honduras International Military Education and Training 2012; Honduras Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2012; Honduras Service Academies 2012; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013 (Washington: October 2013) (Link to source).

Sales Table Sources:

  • Honduras Direct Commercial Sales 2010; - United States, Department of State, Report by the Department of State Pursuant to Sec. 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act (Washington:2011) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Foreign Military Sales 2010; - United States, Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency,Excess Defense Articles authorized and furnished to foreign countries under Part II, Chapter 2, Section 516 of the FAA [22 U.S.C.? 2321(j)](Washington: 2011) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Direct Commercial Sales 2011; - U.S. Department of State, Report by the Department of State Pursuant to Section 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, As Amended (Washington: Department of State, June 2012) (Link to source).
  • Honduras Foreign Military Sales 2011; - Department of Defense, DSCA Security Assistance Sales: Detailed Deliveries for Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: DSCA, 2012) (Link to source).

Deployments Table Sources:

  • Honduras ; -