Country Snapshot:

Ecuador

Area in square km: 283,561
Defense expenditure as percentage of GDP (2010): 3.48%
Defense expenditure in dollars (2010): 2,156,832,116
Per capita GDP in dollars (2009): 7,600
Population (2010): 14,790,608
Size of armed forces (2010): 37,184
Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index ranking (2010): 127 (out of 178)
U.S. military personnel present (2009): 26

U.S. Aid to Ecuador, All Programs, 2010-2015

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Grant military and police aid to Ecuador, All Programs, 2010-2015

Aid Program201020112012201320142015Program Total
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement3,250,0004,300,0004,300,0004,302,8674,302,86720,455,734
Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance10,057,0004,974,0001,649,0001,649,0001,649,00019,978,000
Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance1,656,0001,300,0002,333,4372,333,4372,333,4379,956,311
Foreign Military Financing500,000499,000450,000427,000427,0002,303,000
Service Academies215,562693,266449,552449,552449,5522,257,484
International Military Education and Training375,000400,000281,000340,000340,000360,0002,096,000
Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program35,00062,53983,67983,67983,679348,576
Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies129,860145,3501,0761,0761,076278,438
Excess Defense Articles5,8345,834
Global Peace Operations Initiative0
TOTAL16,224,25612,374,1559,547,7449,586,6119,586,611360,00057,679,377

All amounts in U.S. dollars. Numbers in italics are estimates, usually based on the closest year for which data are available.

Grant economic and social aid to Ecuador, All Programs, 2010-2015

Aid Program20102011201220132014Program Total
Development Assistance24,783,00017,270,00016,420,00013,376,00013,376,00085,225,000
Section 1207 Security and Stabilization Assistance15,800,00015,800,000
Defense Department Humanitarian Assistance3,634,4283,634,428
International Narcotics Control Economic Aid100,000200,000200,000200,133200,133900,266
TOTAL44,317,42817,470,00016,620,00013,576,13313,576,133105,559,694

All amounts in U.S. dollars. Numbers in italics are estimates, usually based on the closest year for which data are available.

All Grant Aid to Ecuador, All Programs, 2010-2015

201020112012201320142015TOTAL
TOTAL60,541,68429,844,15526,167,74423,162,74423,162,744360,000163,239,071

Military and Police Trainees from Ecuador, All Programs, 2010-2015

Aid Program201020112012Program Total
Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance125136102363
International Military Education and Training722821121
Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies3437980
Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program272736
Service Academies991432
Global Peace Operations Initiative77
Foreign Military Sales4116
Non-Security Assistance - Unified Command0
TOTAL271213161645

U.S. Institutions that Trained Personnel from Ecuador, All Programs, 2010-2015 (Max. 20 Shown)

Institution2010Total
Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation9696
Inter-American Air Forces Academy7474
Coast Guard International Training Detachment2727
Air Force Academy66
Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies66
Army Aviation Center55
INFANTRY SCHOOL33
USATC33
Army Aviation Logistics School33
Defense Language Institute English Language Center22
Coast Guard Maritime Law Enforcement Academy22
Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies22
Coast Guard International Training Center11
Coast Guard COMLANTAREA11
Security Assistance Training Management OFC11
Army National Guard Warrior Training Center11
Naval Staff College11
TOTAL234234

Arms and Equipment Sold to Ecuador, All Programs, 2010-2015

Program20102011Program Total
Direct Commercial Sales14,196,29224,568,38538,764,677
Foreign Military Sales3,482,0001,377,0004,859,000
TOTAL17,678,29225,945,38543,623,677

All amounts in U.S. dollars.

Official Descriptions of Aid to Ecuador

U.S. Department of Defense, 2012

Document: Section 1209 and Section 1203(b) Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Years 2008, 2009, and 2010

Program: Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance

In Ecuador, the riverine program is maintaining impressive 80% operational readiness rates for their boats and making significant seizures within the Sucumbios province.

U.S. Department of State, 2012

Document: International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2012 Program and Budget Guide

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

Program Overview

Ecuador is a major transit country for illicit drugs trafficked from Colombia and Peru to the United States, as well as a source of chemical precursors diverted for illicit narcotics manufacturing. Transit of illicit drugs is a major concern; therefore, the preponderance of U.S. counternarcotics assistance for Ecuador targets interdiction efforts. Counternarcotics cooperation continues to be one of the strongest pillars of the U.S. bilateral relationship with Ecuador. The U.S. remains committed to help Ecuador build a sustainable framework to counter the threat of drug trafficking and other transnational crimes.

Program Goals and Objectives

U.S. counternarcotics assistance is provided to improve the institutional capabilities of Ecuador’s police, military, and judicial sectors in support of the host government's efforts to effectively combat narcotics trafficking, money laundering, and other transnational crimes. These program objectives support Embassy Quito's foremost Mission Strategic and Resource Plan Goal for FY 2012 to disrupt narcotics trafficking and other transnational crimes. The objectives and goals also reflect INL's FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR), Counternarcotics, and Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: Strengthen police capabilities to disrupt the movement of illicit drugs transiting through Ecuador, and on to the United States, and dismantle narcotics trafficking organizations operating in Ecuador.

Objective 2: Build law enforcement capabilities to conduct criminal and financial investigations, resulting in arrest and prosecution of narcotics trafficking and transnational criminal organization leadership.

Objective 3: Support and strengthen military mobility, communications, and operational capabilities to effectively disrupt narcotics trafficking along Ecuador's northern border with Colombia.

FY 2012 Program

Counternarcotics

- Interdiction: Funds will support the Counternarcotics Police Directorate (DNA) port and canine operations; mobile anti-narcotics units including modernization of detection equipment; provision of communications equipment; vehicle acquisition and maintenance; as well provide a port security advisor from U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Funding will also support improving the prosecution of criminal cases, particularly those related to narcotics trafficking and money laundering, as well as provide assistance for the implementation of the code of criminal procedures. Support for the military will build capacity to protect national territory against narcotics traffickers in areas of limited police presence, particularly along the northern border with Colombia.

- Demand Reduction: Funds will provide informational materials and sponsor drug prevention and demand reduction public events to increase public awareness of the dangers of drug abuse. Funds will also support drug awareness projects operated by the Government of Ecuador (GOE).

Transnational Crime

- Money Laundering and Chemical Control: Funds will provide training, equipment, and technical assistance to help the GOE more effectively combat money laundering. Funds will support financial investigative and chemical control police units and also the Financial Intelligence Unit.

Department of State, 2011

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

The United States supports Ecuador's efforts to strengthen institutional capacity. U.S. counternarcotics assistance improves the professional capabilities, equipment, and integrity of Ecuador's police, military, and judicial agencies, enabling them to more effectively combat criminal organizations involved in narcotics trafficking and money laundering.

Along Ecuador's northern border region endemic poverty, isolation, and proximity to FARC-controlled Colombian territory combine to make the region unstable. Recognizing this, the U.S. continues to support programs that improve good governance and create opportunities for licit activities in areas along the northern border. In 2011, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) support financed 42 infrastructure projects that benefited some 34,500 people; helped generate jobs and increased the average incomes of nearly 6,200 families by strengthening value chains in cacao, coffee, and other products; and strengthened 21 local governments in the northern border. The United States also supports Ecuadorian police and military presence in the northern border region and police presence in other strategically important locations throughout the country. In 2011, Ecuador opened a $2 million U.S.-funded police facility which will increase the police presence along the southern border, an area with significant criminal activity.

The DNA remains the primary recipient of U.S. counternarcotics assistance, which includes the provision of vehicles, equipment, and training, as well as the construction of installations at ports and border areas. The DNA includes special nationwide units, such as the Mobile Anti-Narcotics Teams, a drug detection canine program, and a money laundering unit. In 2011, the U.S. continued to provide support to the military to facilitate their mobility and communications for narcotics interdiction activities along the northern border.

Ecuador is an active participant in the U.S. Coast Guard-sponsored Multilateral Counterdrug Summit, which also includes Panama, Peru, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Mexico. The goal of these summits is to identify and implement cooperative measures to combat maritime drug trafficking. Also in 2011, the U.S Coast Guard conducted one mobile training team and two resident courses in law enforcement, search and rescue, port security and professional development.

Meanwhile, the United States supports prevention programs in coordination with the Ministry of Education, CONSEP, and other governmental entities that address drug abuse awareness.

U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Defense, 2009

Document: Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010

Ecuador's democracy historically has been burdened by presidential and institutional instability. President Rafael Correa, Ecuador's eighth president in ten years, was elected in November 2006 promising rapid and fundamental reform. He remains popular and a new constitution that he championed won over 60 percent of the vote in a November 2008 national referendum. However, over the past year, due to declining exports, energy rationing and the worldwide economic downturn, Correa's popularity began to decline significantly.

Ecuador's military had a great deal of independence and political influence in the past, but its senior leaders are increasingly becoming politicized by the administration of President Rafael Correa. Additionally, under new regulations imposed by Correa's government, the Armed Forces have lost some independent funding sources which increase its dependence on the budget process and reduce its fiscal and political independence.

The emphasis for the United States Military Group in training is centered on logistics and maintenance. The Ecuadorian Armed Forces cannot maintain their current fleet of vehicles, ships and aircraft. New equipment acquisitions frequently do not take into account the long term costs of equipment maintenance, spare parts, special equipment and specialized training. Additional training focuses on munitions handling, storage and destruction, peace operations, the rule of law and discipline in military operations, Junior Officer Professional development, and technical training on US procedures for operations, military planning processes and maintenance. Another principal training focus is to further Ecuador's security and patrolling capabilities to enforce their sovereignty against the threat from illegal armed groups, like the FARC, which operate in Ecuador and to aid in the fight against illegal narcotics and weapons trafficking. The United States continues to develop military relations with Ecuador in the face of an extremely challenging internal political climate.

Ecuador is designated as a major drug-transiting country and much of our bilateral cooperation focuses on Counternarcotics (CN) operations, officer training, resource management, logistics, equipment maintenance, and providing training needed to professionalize and modernize Ecuador's military. Significant training efforts in counterdrug operations have also been conducted, as Ecuador has received $1.3 M in section 1004 counterdrug funding for 2009. Joint exercises with U.S. forces contributed to continued cooperation with US CN efforts.

In November 1999, Ecuador and the United States concluded a ten-year agreement for access to, and use of, the Manta Cooperative Security Location, Ecuador, as a support base for US aircraft monitoring drug trafficking flights through the region. The agreement terminated in September 2009.

Ecuador began its association with the Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) in FY 2005, receiving $58,000 in CTFP invitational courses. It received over $562,000 in CTFP in FY 2007, no funding in 2008, but then $98,000 again in 2009. Using CTFP for two mobile training teams, Ecuador received disaster planning training for 35 students and international homeland defense training for 30 students. They were also able to send an officer to the US for the Legal Aspects and Countering Terrorism course. Attendance at these and similar courses will allow Ecuadorians to analyze and plan for global threats and their various manifestations; recognize global terrorism mechanisms, including the modes, means, roots, and psychology of transnational terrorism; and evaluate the means to counter this threat within and outside Ecuador.

International Military Education and Training (IMET) funds support Ecuadorian military participation in Professional Military Education (PME) training at U.S. military colleges and school enhancing the understanding by host nation on civil control of the military, strategy, and human rights. As a means of strengthening defense ties, the United States welcomes participation from Ecuador at CHDS executive courses. These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations, and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. Expanded IMET (E-IMET) courses and funding enabled increased emphasis on human rights instruction and civil military operations. All of the IMET courses allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts in Ecuador. For FY2009, Ecuador received $342,000 in IMET funding.

U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Defense, 2008

Document: Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2008 and 2009

Ecuador's democracy historically has been burdened by presidential and institutional instability. President Rafael Correa, Ecuador's eighth president in ten years, was elected in November 2006 promising rapid and fundamental reform. He remains popular and a new constitution that he championed won over 60 percent of the vote in a November 2008 national referendum.

Ecuador's military has a great deal of independence and political influence, and it has some funding sources of its own which reduce its dependence on the budget process. The Ecuadorian military played a controversial role in the January 2000 political crisis, but has since reaffirmed its commitment to civilian control.

Training in peace operations, the rule of law and discipline in military operations, Non-Commissioned Officer (NCO) professional development, technical training in U.S. procedures for maintenance and operations, as well as participation at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS), help reinforce the principles of civilian control of the military and strengthen the principles of human rights, and the capabilities of the host nation to enforce their sovereignty and support counterterrorism and counternarcotics efforts. The United States has matured but currently challenging bilateral relations with Ecuador.

Ecuador is designated as a major drug-transiting country and much of our bilateral cooperation focuses on counternarcotics (CN) operations, officer training, resource management, logistics, equipment maintenance, and providing training needed to professionalize and modernize Ecuador's military. Significant training efforts in counterdrug operations have also been conducted, as Ecuador has received $1.4 MM in section 1004 counterdrug funding historically. Joint exercises with U.S. forces contributed to continued cooperation with U.S. CN efforts. In November 1999, Ecuador and the United States concluded a ten-year agreement for access to, and use of, the Manta Cooperative Security Location, Ecuador, as a support base for U.S. aircraft monitoring drug trafficking flights through the region. The agreement terminates in November 2009 and the Correa administration has officially given notice that while the agreement will not be renewed, Ecuador may be open to non-DOD led alternatives to continue counter-narcotics surveillance flights.

Ecuador began its association with the Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) in FY 2005, receiving $58,000 in CTFP invitational courses. It received over $350,000 in CTFP in FY 2007. Ecuador sent three students to port security training, a student to the Naval Command and General Staff College and the Air War College, and two students to the National Defense University's (NDU) Counterterrorism Fellows Program. The NDU program offers selected foreign officials graduate accredited courses from NDU's School for Senior National Security Executive Education (SNSEE). Counterterrorism (CT) Fellows participate in these seminars and also attend elective courses alongside American counterparts from the military services, DoD, other Executive Branch agencies, and relevant congressional staffs. SNSEE brings a broad strategic perspective to these inter-service, interagency, and international deliberations. Attendance at these and similar courses will allow Ecuadorians to analyze global threats and their various manifestations; recognize global terrorism mechanisms, including the modes, means, roots, and psychology of transnational terrorism; and evaluate the means to counter this threat within and outside Ecuador. Unfortunately, Ecuador received no funds from CTFP in FY 2008, and only $35,000 in FY09, making it difficult to maintain our level of engagement.

International Military Education and Training (IMET) funds support Ecuadorian military participation in Professional Military Education (PME) training at U.S. military colleges and school enhancing the understanding by host nation on civil control of the military, strategy, and human rights. As a means of strengthening defense ties, the United States welcomes participation from Ecuador at CHDS executive courses. These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations, and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts in Ecuador.

U.S. Department of State, 2011

Document: Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Program and Budget Guide, Fiscal Year 2011

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

Program Overview

Ecuador is a major transit country for illicit drugs trafficked from Colombia and Peru to the United States, as well as a source of chemical precursors diverted for illicit narcotics manufacturing. With transit of illicit drugs a major concern -- the lion's share of U.S. counternarcotics assistance for Ecuador targets interdiction efforts. Counternarcotics cooperation continues to be one of the strongest pillars of the U.S. bilateral relationship with Ecuador. The U.S. remains committed to help Ecuador build a sustainable framework to counter the threat of drug trafficking and other transnational crimes.

Program Goals and Objectives

U.S. counternarcotics assistance is provided to improve the institutional capabilities of Ecuador"s police, military, and judicial sectors in support of the host government's efforts to effectively combat narcotics trafficking, money laundering, and other transnational crimes. These program objectives support Embassy Quito's foremost Mission Strategic Goal for FY 2011: promoting regional stability, disruption of narcotics trafficking and other transnational crimes. The objectives and goals also reflect INL's FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals -- criminal justice sector capacity building, counternarcotics, and transnational crime.


Objective 1: Strengthen police capabilities to significantly disrupt the movement of illicit drugs transiting through Ecuador, and on to the United States, and dismantle narcotics trafficking organizations operating in Ecuador.

Objective 2: Build law enforcement capabilities to conduct criminal and financial investigations, resulting in arrest and prosecution of narcotics trafficking and transnational criminal organization leadership.

Objective 3: Support and strengthen military mobility, communications, and operational capabilities to effectively disrupt narcotics trafficking along Ecuador's northern border with Colombia.

FY 2011 Program


Interdiction: Funds will support the Counternarcotics Police Directorate (DNA) port and canine operations; mobile anti-narcotics units; including modernization of detection equipment; provision of communications equipment; vehicle acquisition and maintenance; as well providing a port security advisor from U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Funding will also support improving the prosecution of criminal cases, particularly those related to narcotics trafficking and money laundering, as well as provide assistance for the implementation of the code of criminal procedures. INL support for the military will build capacity to protect national territory against narcotics traffickers in areas of limited police presence. This is an ongoing project.

Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction: Funds will provide informational materials and sponsor drug prevention and demand reduction public events to increase public awareness of the dangers of drug abuse. Funds will also support drug awareness projects operated by the GOE. This is an ongoing project

Money Laundering and Chemical Control: Funds will provide training, equipment, and technical assistance to help the GOE more effectively combat money laundering. Funds will support financial investigative and chemical control police units and also the Financial Intelligence Unit. This is an ongoing project.

U.S. Department of State, 2009

Document: 2009 End-Use Monitoring Report

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

QUITO

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

NAS Director, Drew Schyfletowski, Tel. 593-2 398-5311, dshufletowski@state.gov



Staff Member Responsibilities

The NAS Deputy Director supervises the implementation and planning of End Use Monitoring and resolves problems that might arise during the inventory. The NAS Program specialist coordinates the inventory. The NAS Inventory Specialist and Mobility Assistant conduct the physical inventory verification. In addition, the POC for post's Military group End Use Monitoring activities is the Logistics NCO. The NAS CBP adviser located at the U.S. Consulate in Guayaquil provides monitoring and spot checks of equipment and vehicles during his site visits.

Inventory System

NAS Ecuador uses two types of databases to record and track the distribution of all resources provided to host government agencies and to maintain and retrieve End Use Monitoring information. The NAS Inventory Assistant uses an Access database on a laptop computer to monitor all of NAS's donated resources. The NAS Mobility Assistant uses an Excel database to monitor NAS' donated vehicles.

The MILGP maintains an Excel data base to record all military deliveries. The database includes information such as description, location, recipient, and condition of donated items. Deliveries to Ecuadorian Military Units are recorded on hand receipts signed by/for the unit commanders. The MILGP monitors all of these items annually and records updates to the items by location, use and condition of equipment. USMILGP provides the Ecuadorian Armed Forces a copy of the excel data base kept by USMILGP as a tool for the Armed Forces to upkeep their records.

Staff Member Responsibilities



The NAS Deputy Director coordinates all of the activities regarding End Use Monitoring. He works closely with the NAS FSN-10 Program Specialist, Monica Villacreces, who assists in the coordination of EUM activities. She assists with the implementation and direction of the monitoring and works closely with the FSN-8 Mobility Assistant, who conducts the mobility inventory, FSN Project/Engineering, who provides the inventory of the facilities, and FSN Inventory Assistant, who conducts the physical, on-site inventory verifications.

Other USG Agency Assistance

The USMILGP conducts regular reviews and monitoring of NAS-donated resources to their military counterparts.

Counterpart Agencies

Ecuadorian Anti-Drug National Police (ENP-DNA)
Sensitive Investigative Unit (SIU)


Directorate of Police Intelligence Unit (DGI)
Money Laundering Unit (ULA)
Customs Bulk Cash Smuggling Group (GELA)
National Directorate for Crime Against Children and Human Trafficking (DINAPEN)
Attorney General's Office
Transnational Crime Unit
Judicial Police (PJ)
DNA's Unit for Investigation of Ports and Airports (SIPA)
Anti-drug Police Canine Units


Police Intervention and Rescue Group (GIR)
Special Mobile (GEMA)
Ecuadorian Military (ECUMIL)

Receipt

The issuing of NAS donated resources is done through a receiving and inspection report (DS-127/OF-127). The receiving agency inspects the items and takes receipt of them by signing the receiving and inspection report. A signed memorandum by the NAS and the Ecuadorian counterpart is also used to document some transfers. The MILGP also maintains a separate receipt documenting the transfer of equipment to military units, which provides a duplicate copy from the NAS report and signatory responsibility of the end user at at each ECUMIL Command, Directorate or Unit.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections



The NAS performed 118 scheduled and 6 unscheduled inspections at 132 locations. The number of donated items personally inspected was 95%.

Construction Projects

01/07/2009- Guayaquil
01/14/2009- Mascarillas
01/21/2009- Guayaquil
01/29/2009- Guayaquil


02/02/2009- Lago Agrio
02/05/2009- Guayaquil
02/10/2009- Mascarillas
03/03/2009- Mascarillas
03/12/2009- Lago Agrio
03/12/2009- Sucumbios Province
04/20/2009- Guayaquil
04/22/2009- Lago Agrio
04/29/2009- Sucumbios Province


04/30/2009- Mascarillas
06/15/2009- Mascarillas
07/07/2009- Sucumbios Province
07/07/2009- Sucumbios Province
06/16/2009- Guayaquil
06/06/2009- Guayaquil
09/10/2009- Sucumbios Province
09/14/2009- Guayaquil
09/15/2009- San Lorenzo


10/01/2009- Atuntaqui
10/22/2009- Guayaquil
11/12/2009- Catamayo
12/26/2009- SanLorenzo

Mobility Program

There were 6 scheduled and 3 unscheduled inspections performed.

01/27/2009- Baeza


03/11/2009- Quito
04/16/2009- Machula
05/20/2009- Quito
07/24/2009- Ibara
08/26/2009- Guayaquil
09/15/2009- Quito
10/21/2009- Quito
11/23/2009- Tuican



Two hundred twenty-four (224) vehicles and motorcycles were personally inspected at Quito, Guayaquil, Ibarra, Baeza, Tulcan, and Machala by the NAS Military Assistant. In addition, NAS personnel, such as the NAS Inventory Assistant, CBP Advisor, NAS Program Specialist, NAS engineer, and other NAS personnel, conducted spot checks and monitoring of about 186 additional vehicles and motorcycles through visits to many other locations throughout the country, including Loja, Ydel, Cuenca, Azogues, Manta, Portoviejo, Esmeraldas, San Lorenza, Lago Agrio, coca, Tena, Latacunga, Ambato and Riobamba.

The NAS Mobility Program has 20 vehicles and 143 motorcycles, so the percentage of vehicles and motorcycles monitored during 2009 was 99%. For all vehicles, the NAS mobility assistant maintained contact with the supply personnel at each location to determine the proper use of the vehicles and motorcycles.

Military Projects

01/11/2009- De Amazonas
01/12/2009- De Amazonas
01/13/2009- De Amazonas
01/14/2009- De Amazonas


02/03/2009- De Amazonas
02/04/2009- Tulcan
02/11/2009- Tulcan
02/10/2009- Tulcan
02/12/2009- De Amazonas
02/13/2009- Lago Agrio
03/10/2009- De Amazonas
03/17/2009- De Amazonas
03/19/2009- DeAmazonas


03/26/2009- Lago Agrio
04/06/2009- De Amazonas
04/07/2009- De Amzaonas
04/08/2009- DeAmazonas
06/02/2009- Lago Agrio
06/03/2009- Lago Agrio
08/11/2009- Manta
08/12/2009- Manta
08/13/2009- Manta


09/02/2009- Ibarra
09/08/2009- Lago Agrio
09/09/2009- Lago Agrio
09/10/2009- Lao Agrio
09/15/2009- Manta
09/16/2009- Manta
09/17/2009- Manta
09/24/2009- San Lorenzo
10/06/2009- De Amazonas


10/07/2009- De Amazonas
12/01/2009- De Amazonas
12/02/2009- DeAmazonas

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resources

Secondary methods of End Use Monitoring were used for two (2) DNA units located in the Galapagos. There was no physical inspection of NAS resources in the Galapagos this year.

The MILGP sends their inventory list to the Ecuadorian Military Joint Command requesting input on the location, use and condition of each item. In addition, the MILGP often has personnel on-site to monitor the equipment donated to the military units.

The NAS and MILGP hold permanent discussions on the use and location of deliveries during formal meetings, official memos, and via phone with the Ecuadorian police and military operational levels throughout the year. Secondary methods were used 5% of the time.



Status-Commodities

Vehicles

The NAS Mobility Program had 233 vehicles and 137 motorcycles delivered to the DNA. The Mobility Program is in charge of the expenses of maintenance and fuel for these vehicles. The NAS provided the fuel for these vehicles until December 30, 2009. Beginning in 2010, the mobility program will only provide maintenance for these vehicles. The fleet is divided between automobiles, pickups, vans and SUV's trucks. The DNA has different branch offices such as their canine center, unit headquarters; specialized anti-narcotics police units, intelligence units, etc. Vehicles are distributed to these units depending on the needs of each office. The vehicles are used for different duties by the Antinarcotics Ecuadorian Police branch agencies. The pickups are used for operations to control drug distribution in each city. Sedans are used in undercover operations. Some are painted like taxis. The canine units use the pickups and trucks in the transportation and logistics of the canines.





































DNA Quito
Nissan Sentra 3
Chevrolet Aveo emotion 2
Hyundai Getz 1
Mitsubishi Montero sport 3
Ford Explorer 1
Ford Ranger pickup 2
Ford F-350 1
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 6
Chevrolet DMAX pickup
Toyota Hilux pickup 6
Nissan Urvan van 1
Hyundai Hi 2
Hyubdai county 1
Ford E-350 1
International 3800 bus 1
Hino dutro truck 1

























JPA Pichincha
Volkswagon GOL 5
Nissan Sentra 1
Skoda Fabia 2
Ford explorer SUV 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 3
Mazsa B2200 pickup 2
Nissan Urvan Van 1
Hyundai county bus 1
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1
Honda XL200 motorcycles 9
Chevrolet DMAX 1













CAC Quito
Volkswagon GOL 1
Nissan Frontier Pickup 4
Hyundai H100 van 1
Honda Motorcycles 3
Hino Dutro truck 1

Backscatter Van -Quito


Nissan Sentra
1


Toyota Hilux
1


Mercedes Van
1



Backscatter Van -Guayaquil


Nissan Frontier
1


Toyota Hilux
1


Mercedes sprinter
1



















JPA Guayas


Nissen Sentra 2
Chevrolet Dmax pickup 2
Nissan Frontier pickup 5
Mazda B2200 pickup 1
Nissan Urvan van 1
Daihatsu Delta truck 1
Chevrolet NPR 1
Honda XL200 motorcycles 7



Gema Baeza
Nissan Frontier Pickup

5
Chevrolet Dmax pickup

2
Toyota Hilux pickup

1
Mazda B2600 pickup

1
Toyota Hiace van

1
Hyundai county bus

1
Hino Dutro truck

1
Honda motorcycle

2











GEMA Y Del Jobo
Ford Ranger pickup 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 3
Toyota Hilux pickup 1
Honda motorcycles 1



GEMA San Lorenzo
Chevrolet LUV pickup

2
Chevrolet LUV D/Max Pickup

1
Toyota Hilux pickup

1
Honda motorcycles

2




GEMA San Jeronimo
Chevrolet LUV pickup

1
Nissan Frontier pickup

2
Toyota Hilux pickup

1
Motorcycle Honda XR250

2























SIPA Guayas
Nissan Sentra 2
Chevrolet LUV pickup 2
Nissan Frontier pickup 2
Mazda B2600 pickup 1
Chrolet LUV D/MAX pickup 1
Toyota Hilus pickup 1
Honda XL200 motorcycles 3
Skoda Fabia 1
Aveo Emotion 2
Hyundai Gets 1









JPA Azuay
Chevrolet LUV 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 1
Honda motorcycles 3



























JPA Carchi
Volkswagon GOL 1
Nissan Sentra 1
Ford Ranger Pickup 5
Nissan Frontier pickup 3
Mazda B2600 pickup 1
Toyota Hilux pickup 1
Nissan Urvan van 1
Daihatsu Delta Truck 2
Hyundai Gets 1
Motorcycle CB250 1
Motorcycle XR250 1
Motorcycle XL200 3










UCA Manta
Motorcycle XL200 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 2
Toyota Hilus pickup 1

JPA Imbabura


Volkswagon GOL
1


Nissan Sentra
2


Hyundai Accent
1


Nissan Frontier pickup
2


Motorcycles
3


SIPA Quiyo


Volkswagon GOL
1


Chevrolet Corsa Evoluation
2


Nissan Sentra
3


Skoda Fabia
1


Hyundai Accent
1


Hyundai Getz
1


Nissan Frontier pickup
1


Chevrolet DMAX
1


Honda motorcycle
6


GEMA Guayaquil


Chevrolet LUV
1


Honda Motorcycle
1


JPA Tungurahua


Volkswagon GOL
1


Nissan Frontier pickup
1


Honda motorcycles XL200
3


JPA Loja


Nissan Frontier
2


Chevrolet LUV
1


Chevrolet LUV D/Max
1


Motorcycles
4


JPA Imbabura


Volkswagon GOL
1


Nissan Sentra
2


Hyundai Accent
1


Nissan Frontier
2


Motorcycles
5


JPA Tungurahua


Volkswagon GOL
1


Nissan Frontier Pickup
1


Honda Motorcycle
3



JPA Loja


Nissan Frontier pickup
2


Chevrolet LUV
1


Chevrolet LUV D/MAX
1


Motorcycles
4


JPA Esmeraldas


Chevrolet LUV
1


Nissan Frontier pickup
2


JA Cotopaxi


Nissan frontier pickup
1


Skoda Fabia
1


Motorcycle
4


USA Carchi


Chevrolet LUV pickup
1


Nissan Frontier
1


Toyota Hilux
1


Motorcycle
1


UCA San Lorenzo


Nissan Frontier
1


JPA Galapagos


Nissan Frontier pickup
1


Honda motor cycle XL200
2


JPA Chimborazo


Nisssan Frontir pickup
1


Honda Motorcycle
3


SJP Santo Domingo


Chevrolet LUV pickup
1


Honda motorcycle XL200
2


JPA El Oro


Chevrolet LUV pickup
1


Toyota Hilux pickup
1


Honda motorcycles XL200
3


Nissan Frontier
1


UCA Machala


Honda motorcycle XL1200
2


Nissan Frontier pickup
2



JPA Chimborzo


Nissan Frontier pickup
2


Motorcycle
3


UCAMS (Canine Unit)


Nissan Frontier pickup
2


Chevrolet LUV D/MAX pickup
1


Mazda pickup
1


Honda Motorcycle
1


JPA Santa Elena


Nissan Frontier pickup
1


Motorcycle
1


JBA Bolivar


Nissan Frontier pickup
1


Honda motorcycle XL200
1


JBA Sucumbios JPA Sucumbios


Nissan Frontier pickup
3


Chevrolet LUV D/MAX pickup
1


Mazda pickup
2


Hino Dutra truck
1


Honda motorcycle
3


JPA Orellana


Nissan Frontier pickup
1


Honda motorcycle
5


DGI Quito


Volkswagen GoL
2


Chevrolet Aveo Emotion
2


Hyundai Van
2


Motorcycles
4



JPA Pastaza


Nissan Frontier pickup
1



SIU


Ford Explorer SUV
1


Chevrolet Rodeo SUV
1


Chevrolet LUV
1


Hyundai Van
1


Hilux pickup
1


Chevrolet Corsa
2


Volkswagon GOL
1


Volkswagon Golf
1


Nissan Sentra
8


Chevrolet DMAX pickup
1


Mazda Pickup
2


Nissan Frontier
4


Toyota Forerunner SUV
1


Toyota runner SUV
1


Toyota Hiace van
2


Motorcycle
14



JPA Esmeraldas


Mazda pickup
1


Ford Ranger
1


Nissan Frontier Pickup
1


Honda Motorcycle
2



SLPA Manta


Mazda pickup
1


Honda motorcycle
3


Hyundai Getz
1


Nisan Frontier
1



JPA Canar


Nissan Frontier pickup
1


Honda motorcycle
2



JPA Manabi


Nissan Frontier pickup
2


Honda motorcycle
3


Hyundai accent
1



Giace (Money Laundering)


Chevrolet LUV D/Max
1


Honda motorcycle
2


Hyundai Accent
1



PJ Quito


Nissan Frontier pickup
2


Motorcycle
1



Aeropolitical Santo Domingo


Nissan Frontier pickup
1


Ford Ranger pickup
2




COAC Quito


Volkswagon GOL
2


Chevrolet LUV pickup
1


Hyundai Hido
2


Honda motorcycle
4



Judicial Police Unit


Pickup Truck
1


Motorcycle
1





SAP Aeropolitical Unit


Pickup truck
3



DGI Unit


Volkswagon GOL
2


Pickup
1


Van
2


Aveo emotion sedan
2


Motorcycle
4


Ford Explorer SUV
1


Chevrolet Rodeo UV
1


Hyundai Van
1




The Ecuador Military program has 270 vehicles and 143 motorcycles. 

Miscellaneous Equipment

Three body scan ray machines were donated to the ENP/DNA. One Hazmet ID system was donated to the DEA sponsored Special Investigative Unit. Ten ion scanners were donated to the Ecuadorian Military. Six identify IR's detectors were donated to the DNA. Forty sets of scuba gear with compressors (2) were donated to the DNA/GEMA. Fifteen CT-30 contraband inspection kits were donated to the DNA. Two chromatographers were donated to the PJ. Nineteen sets of individual equipment (clothing, footwear, eye protection, police related items and communication accessories) were donated to the money laundering/human trafficking unit. One hundred thirteen thousand dollars (113,000) of computer equipment (17 PC's, 4 servers, 17 hard drives, 2 UPS', 6 printers, 1 scanner,. 10 CCTV cameras, 4 INFOCUS projectors, 2 security bundles, 2 switches, 2 routers, and miscellaneous software) donated to the Financial Intelligence Unit. Living room furniture donated to the DNA/UCA Quito Airport (2 sofas, 1 loveseat, and 4 chairs); 96 bedding sets, 68 bunk beds, 5 living room furniture sets, 2 dining room furniture sets, 3 UPS'155 mattresses, 97cookers, 3 office furniture sets, 45 air conditoners, 245 reflective vests, 35 helmets, 5 televisions, 7 DVD players, 2 pressure washers, 3 binoculars, 1 security surveillance equipment, 2 projectors. All of these items have been donated to the DNA units around the country.

Canine Program

Ninety-nine (99) NAS donated dogs are in the DNA inventory, 30 of which are newly acquired; 45 are in the Pichincha; 23 in Guayas, 2 in Sucumbios, 4 in Imbabura; 3 in Manta; 10 in tulan; 1 in Latacunga; 3 in Esmeraldas; 7 in Mcahala; 1 inY del Jobo.



Thirty (30) dog canines were bought and donated to the Canine Training Center in 2009. The dogs were entered into the next canine guide training course and will then be re-assigned to their next post along with their handlers upon completion of the course. 

Vessels

Four Boston Whalers were donated to the Ecuadorian Military through the USMILGP. Five Zodiac boats w/engines (2 each) are located at the Port of Guayaquil until training is completed. Afterwards, the boats will be sent to different ports of Machala, Guayaquil, Esmeraldas, and Mana.











Ecuadorian Military
25-foot Boston Whaler 4
Zodiac Boat 470 10
Zodiac boat 550 1
Pukina (refurbished) boats 15

Five Zodiac boats are used for port operations along the near coastal waters.

Weapons

The NAS had previously contributed weapons to the Ecuadorian National Police Anti- Drug Units. There is still a deficiency in weapons and ammunition within the DNA. However, the majority of the police units have a stock of weapons to issue to personnel for use during operations.



ENP/DNA
Pietro Beretta

43
Sig-Sauer

700
Colt AR-15

500

Status-Services

Demand Reduction



The NAS has supported training and prevention activities by producing a best practices video series for police investigators and by producing and disseminating, in cooperation with PAS, a musical audio CD dealing with prevention of drugs and TIP to be used in prevention campaigns with Ecuadorian youth, particularly high school students. So far, 1000 students have been reached through this initiative.

Within the NAS, ABA Justice Penal Ecuador (JPE) Program, judges and prosecutors around the country participate in training sessions on oral litigation skills for improving the prosecutorial procedures. The NAS, in cooperation with the Council of the Judiciary and the Universidad Tecnica de Loja, supported the development of a web based case tracking system. Activities for training police investigators have reached 186 investigators with a basic training course for a total coverage of 2,100 police investigators so far. A selected group of investigators have been trained on investigation techniques including crime scene protection and in workshops discussing the perpetrators' modus operandi. In addition, with NAS support, an evaluation system devoted to determining the level of understanding the investigators have attained on the legal framework ruling their operations, with 4,500 investigators evaluated so far.

ABA has trained Ecuadorian criminal justice operators in the investigation and prosecution of serious offences and criminal organizations. They have supported criminal justice operators, scholars and lawyers in discussing the impact of new constitution in the prosecution and ruling of crimes; discussing and elaborating urgent reforms to the Crimean Procedures code needed for the transitional period and discussing long-run comprehensive reforms to the Criminal Justice System.

The United National office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) completed a NAS funded grant to support drug prevention and demand reduction programs titled “Integrated Drug Abuse Prevention in Urban communities in Manta, Loja, Ambata, Esmeraldas, Ibarra, and Santa Cruz.

Construction Projects

The facilities donated to the Police are used by the Antinarcotics Police Unit for canine units, mobile units, and Special Forces that control the drug traffic. The remodeled and constructed buildings are used for offices and barracks for the Antinarcotics Police personnel to live and to have a safe area.



The donated buildings are in good condition for their normal operations, except for the following police units that need small improvements at maintenance levels: integrated police check point in San Geronimo, police check point in La Y del Jobo, and Carchi antinarcotics police headquarters in Tulcan. To improve the maintenance, post is developing a maintenance contract for the equipment.

Inspections of the following construction projects completed in 2009 were performed:

Troops Barracks, dining room and kitchen for CICC DNI -100%
Maintenance work for Airport canine unit, Mana-100%
Cover of parking area for GEMA group, Baeza -100%
Adaptation of kennels for the canine center at Quito airport Remodeling offices and troop barracks for canine unit at port Guayaquil -100%
Enlargement of Troop barracks for the Canine Training Center, Quito -100%


Metallic Divisions and Ceiling for the DNA warehouse, Quito -100%
Roof change from kennels area to the canine center, Quito -100%
Construction of fence and cover for kennels at Manta-100%
Remodeling facilities of Pichincha headquarters anti-drug police, Quito-100%
Removing an installation of new doors for JPAP -100%
Improvement of Fiscals office for JPAP, Quito -100%
Installation of electrical system for computers at JPAP offices, Quito -100%
Remodeling of office for the Judicial Police -100%
Adaptation of barracks and construction of kennels for the anti-narcotics police- 100%


Construction of water tank and installation of one 2 HP pump, Baeza-100%
Training rooms for dogs at the canine training center, Quito-100%
New water supply for GEMA group in Baeza-100%
Diesel tank for generator at San Jeronimo police checkpoint -100%
Parking area national police at San Lorenzo -100%
Remodeling of kennels for the Canine Training Center, Quito -100%
Construction of warehouses for CONSEP Guayaquil-100%
Enlargement of GEMA police checkpoint in Baeza -100%
Construction of kennels for the Police Canine Unit, San Domingo -100%


Remodeling of officers dormitories at the Canine Training Center, Quito -100%
Construction of kennels for the canine unit at the airport, Guayaquil-100%
Renovation of roof for the DNA headquarters, Quito -100%
Remodeling of office and dormitories and the canine unit, Santo Domingo-100%
Installation of ceramic tiles and ceiling for instruction room in Cema Baeza - 100%
Remodeling maintenance workshop for BAL 72, Quito-100%
Remodeling workshop for tactical vehicles for Ecuadorian Navy, Esmeraldas- 100%
Adaptation of a maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles for BI 39 BGalo Molina, Tulcan -100%
Adaptation of a maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles of BI 39 Galo Molina, Tulcan -100%


Provision and installation of one 30KVA transformer for the maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles at GFE-25 Esmeraldas-100%
Enlargement of the workshop and construction of parking area for vehicles for the Ecuadorian van, San Lorenzo -100%
Design and construction of one tactical tower for Ecuadorian Army Maldonado, Carchi
Construction of shelters for the ECU Army Esmeraldes-100%
Construction of workshop for tactical vehicles-100%
Maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles for Yahuachi
Ibarra Police port inspection facilities in Puerto Bolivar-el Oro
Area police control base in Santo Domingo de los Colorados-100%
Carchi Antinarcotics Police Headquarters in Tulcan-100%


Police port inspection facilities in Esmeraldas -100%
Construction of barracks and office for Canine Training Center, Quito -100%
Construction of barracks and offices for Canine Airport Unit, Guayaquil -100%
Construction of military base, Sucumbios-100%
Construction and remodeling of Villa military base, Sucumbios -100%
Construction of Barracks and remodeling of offices for SIP Unit-Guayaquil-100%
Remodeling of Anti-Narcotics headquarters barracks in La Saiba-Guayaquil-100%
Remodeling of Canine Unit in Mascarillas-100%
Enlarge of Fence for the Canine Training Center-100%


Enlargment of Barracks for Tobar Donoso Military Base-100%
Construction of the Anti-Narcotics Police Facilities of Guayaquil Port-100%
Remodeling and Maintenance of SanLorenzo Police base-100%
Perimeter Fence and additional works, Lago Agrio-100%
GYE Port Inspection Remodeling, Guayaquil-100%
Port Inspection, Manta- 100%
Helipad construction, San Lorenzo-100%
Police Base Camp, San Lorenzo-100%
Ecuadorian Navy helipad Esmeraldes-100%


Construction of a pier for the Ecuadorian Navy San Lorenzo -100%
Police Base Camp, San Lorenzo-100%
Remodeling facilities of Pichincha headquarters anti-drug police JPAP-Quito- 100%
Extension of two tension network for the maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles for Gala Molina, tulcan-100%
Design and built C-130 working enlargement for FAE-Quito-100%
Remodeling of barracks for the recognition unit in division 1V-100%
Construction of barracks for the 31st wing-100%
Integrated Police check point in Imbabura-100%
Police port inspection facilities in Puerto Bolivar el Oro-100%


Integrated Police Check Point in La Y del Jobo-100%

Program Impact

Communications Equipment

Harris radio products donated to the Ecuadorian Military's 4th Division enabled the unit to better communicate with subordinate units throughout the Sucumbios and Orellana provinces. This allows the units to streamline decision-making process and more rapidly execute missions or changes to missions already taking. Additionally, the formal and informal classes/instructions provided by Harris instructors were absolutely invaluable to the ECUMIL.

Construction Projects



The projects have enabled the anti-narcotics police to locate strategic locations throughout the country. In addition, the projects have improved the standard of living of the anti-narcotics police personnel which has helped to rejuvenate police morale. The work and office area for the police has improved dramatically, thereby increasing the performance of the police. Increased technology in the facilities has also facilitated a responsive force; these new and renovated facilities also provided the police a stronger and more visible presence throughout the country.

Vessels

The Riverine program, run by the Ecuadorian Military along the northern border, has increased the patrolling capacity of the Ecuadorian military along the rivers. This has been accomplished with a growing program that consists of 10 Zodiacs, Boston Whalers and 15 refurbished jet boat piranhas.

Laboratory Equipment

The NAS donated equipment to the Forensic Laboratory for use in analyzing chemicals and drugs in an efficient manner to expedite the resolution of drug cases. The laboratories are equipped with gas chromatographers, Hazmat IDs and identity IR equipment.

Vehicles



The mobility program supports over 90% of the Anti-Narcotics Police vehicles, vans, trucks, and motorcycles. This program is absolutely critical to maintaining the operation.

Surveillance Equipment

Body scans, Hazxmet IDs, ion scanners, identifier IR equipment are critical to the detection and interdiction of illicit narcotics transiting Ecuador.

Military Projects

The renovated facilities in COCA for the Recognition Unit and the new barracks for the 31st Wing in Lago Agrio have improved the military's counternarcotics operational capacity along the northern border with Colombia. In addition, it has increased the standard of living of the military personnel which now have a place to rest and to recover from their field operations.



Vessels

The Riverine program, run by the Ecuadorian Military along the Northern Border, in conjunction with the US Military Group, has increased the patrolling capacity of the Ecuadorian Military along the rivers in the northern border region. This has been accomplished with the growing program that currently consists of 16 Zodiacs, 7 Boston Whalers, and 15 refurbished jet propulsion boats (piranhas).

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

USG assistance is crucial to the counternarcotics program of the Ecuadorian National Police. The central funding received from the National Police by the Anti-Drug Program covers only salaries and basic administrative expenses, aside from 30 vehicles procured for DNA by the ENP in 2006. The NAS provides almost all logistical equipment, operational and mobility support to the Ecuadorian National Police Anti-Drug Directorate.

Drug seizures and arrest statistics for the calendar 2009 are (metric tons)

Seizures



Coca base- 941.21 (kilograms)
Cocaine HCL- 31.96 (MT) in land seizures
Coca HCL- 0.64 (MT) in maritime seizures
Cocaine total- 43.54 (MT)
Heroin- 148.68 (kilograms)
Cannabis- 2.80 (MT)

Drug Laboratories- 7



Arrests- 3,959

Unmonitored Resources

During inspection, equipment has often been signed out by police for day-to-day operations for use in other operational capacities. Therefore, a 100% inspection was not always possible during the scheduled and unscheduled visits. However, these items were inspected by verification of issued hand receipts by each local police logistics/supply officer.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

If the NAS identifies any deficiency in the use of a commodity, the NAS immediately notifies the unit commander and supply officer for corrective action and, if warranted, to the National Director and Deputy Director of the Anti-Narcotics Police, or associated head of the Agency receiving the commodities.



Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

The NAS has noticed some common problems associated with the brake and clutch systems for vehicles used by the police. The main reason for this is the difficult road conditions used by these vehicles. The NAS will continue to monitor this situation and be attentive to all maintenance needs of NAS-funded vehicles, especially with police units that consistently use their vehicles on poor road conditions. In addition, some of these locations did not have adequate maintenance shops with qualified work and spare parts to provide good services. The NAS mobility assistance is assisting in these areas, including basic mechanics and preventive maintenance guidelines.

U.S. Department of State, 2008

Document: 2008 End-Use Monitoring Report

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

QUITO

Background

EUM Program Coodinator

NAS Director, John Haynes, Tel. 593-2 9205-2601, haynesjd@state.gov

Staff Member Responsibilities
The NAS Deputy Director supervises the implementation and planning of the End Use Monitoring and resolves problems that might arise during the inventory. The POC for post's Military Group is MSGT Roberto Caceres, Logistics NCO.

Inventory System
NAS Ecuador uses two types of databases to record and track the distribution of all resources provided to host government agencies and to maintain and retrieve End Use Monitoring information. The NAS Inventory Assistant uses an Access database on a laptop computer to monitor all of NAS's donated resources. The NAS Mobility Assistant uses an Excel database to monitor NAS' donated vehicles.

The MILGP maintains an Excel data base to record all military deliveries. The database includes information such as description, location, recipient, and condition of donated items. Deliveries to Ecuadorian Military Units are recorded on hand receipts signed by/for the unit commanders. The MILGP monitors all of these items annually and records updates to the items by location, use and condition of equipment.

Staff Member Responsibilities
The NAS Deputy Director coordinates all of the activities regarding End Use Monitoring. He works closely with the NAS FSN-10 Program Specialist, Monica Vilacreces, who assists in the coordination of EUM activities. She assists with the implementation and direction of the monitoring and works closely with the FSN-8 Mobility Assistant, Galo Defaz, who conducts the mobility inventory, FSN Project /Engineering, Mario Narvaez, who provides the inventory of the facilities, and FSN Inventory Assistant, Nelson Estrella, who conducts the physical, on-site inventory verifications.

Other USG Agency Assistance
The USMILGP conducts regular reviews and monitoring of NAS-donated resources to their military counterparts.

Counterpart Agencies
Ecuadorian Anti-Drug National Police (ENP-DNA) Sensitive Investigative Unit (SIU) Anti-Smuggling Unit (Migration Control, formerly COAC) Ecuadorian Military (ECUMIL)
Ecuadatorian Judicial Police (JPA)

Receipt
The issuing of NAS donated resources is done through a receiving and inspection report. The receiving agency inspects the items and takes receipt of them by signing the receiving and inspection report. A signed memorandum by the NAS and the Ecuadorian counterpart is also used to document some transfers. The MILGP also maintains a separate receipt documenting the transfer of equipment to military units.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections
The NAS performed 20 scheduled and 6 unscheduled inspections at 18 locations. The number of donated items personally inspected was 95%.
A total of 9,000 items were subject to inspection. Ninety-five percent (95%) of those items were personally inspected.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status
Secondary methods of End Use Monitoring were used for the Anti-Drug National Police (DNA) units (2) located in the Galapagos and Cotopaxi areas. There was insufficient time and opportunity for a physical inspection of NAS resources in these areas this year.

The MILGP sends their inventory list to the Ecuadorian Military Joint Command requesting input on the location, use and condition of each item. In addition, the MILGP often has personnel on-site to monitor the equipment donated to the military units. In addition to comparison of records, the MILGP holds permanent discussions on the use, location, and condition of deliveries during formal meetings with the Ecuadorian military units.

DNA officials contacted the units in the Galapagos and Cotopaxi areas and compared the existing NAS inventory with their inventory. No discrepancies were noted according to DNA officials. The percentage of commodities monitored by secondary methods was 5%.

Status-Commodities

Vehicles
The NAS Mobility Program had 233 vehicles and 131 motorcycles delivered as endowment to DNA. The Mobility Program is in charge of the expenses of maintenance and fuel for these vehicles. The vehicles are divided between automobiles, pickups, vans, SUVs, trucks. The DNA has different branch offices such as the canine centers, intelligence units, etc. Vehicles are distributed to units depending on the duties of each branch office. All of the vehicles are used for different duties by the Antinarcotics Ecuadorian Police branch agencies. The pickups are used for operations to control drug distribution in each city. Sedans are used in undercover operations. Some are painted like taxis. The canine units use the pickups and trucks in the transportation and logistics of the canines.

The NAS Mobility program has 2 backscatter vans. One of the vans is located in the coastal area in the south of the country and the other one along the Northern Border. The fleet is in good condition. Due to a vacancy in the Mobility Assistant position, there was a two-month gap where only emergency maintenance was provided. Due to the arrival of the new Mobility Assistant, the NAS is providing fuel maintenance and fuel services to the NAS donated vehicles. Some vehicles, which are located at towns with poor road conditions, suffered more deterioration than vehicles located in the cities. The NAS Mobility Program has BPAs with maintenance shops, tire vendors, and gas stations in almost all the provinces to maintain the vehicles in good working condition.

DNA Quito

Nissan Sentra 2
Chevrolet Corsa 2
Evoulution
Volkswagon GOL 5
Mitsubishi Montero sport 3
Ford Explorer SUV 1
Ford Ranger 1
Ford F-350 1
Chevrolet LUV pickup 2
Nissan Frontier pickup 11 Chevrolet DMAX pickup 4 Toyota Hilux pickup 6
Nissan Urvan van 1
Toyota Hiace van 1
Chevrolet NPR bus 1
Hyundai country bus 1
International 3800 bus 1
Ford E-350 bus 1
Hino Dutro truck 1

JPA Pichincha

Volkswagon GOL 5
Nissan Sentra 1
Skoda Fabia 2
Ford explorer SUV 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 3
Mazsa B2200 pickup 3
Nissan Urvan Van 1
Hyundai county bus 1
Honda XL200 motorcycles 9
Volkswagon GOL

CAC Quito
1
Nissan Frontier Pickup 4
Chevrolet Dmax pickup 1
Toyota Hilux pickup 1
Hino Dutro truck 1
Honda Motorcycles 4

UIAP Quito
Nissan Sentra 2
Skoda Fabia 2
Chevrolet DMax pickup 1
Honda XL200 motorcycles 5

JPA Guayas
Nissan Sentra 4
Volkswagon GOL 4
Chevrolet Dmax pickup 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 4
Mazda B2200 pickup 1
Nissan Urvan van 1
Daihatsu Delta truck 1
Hino Dutro truck 1
Honda XL200 motorcycles 7

Gema Baeza
Nissan Frontier Pickup 3 Chevrolet Dmax pickup 1
Toyota Hilux pickup 1
Mazda B2600 pickup 1
Toyota Hiace van 1
Hyundai county bus 1
Hino Dutro truck 1
Honda motorcycle 1

GEMA Y Del Jobo
Ford Ranger pickup 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 3
Toyota Hilux pickup 1
Honda motorcycles 2

GEMA San Lorenzo
Chevrolet LUV pickup 2
Chevrolet LUV D/Max Pickup 1
Toyota Hilux pickup 1
Honda motorcycles 2

GEMA San Jeronimo
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1 Nissan Frontier pickup 2
Toyota Hilux pickup 1

SIPA Guayas
Nissan Sentra 2 Chevrolet LUV pickup 2
Nissan Frontier pickup 2
Mazda B2600 pickup 1
Chrolet LUV D/MAX 1 pickup
Toyota Hilus pickup 1
Honda XL200 motorcycles 3

JPA Azuay
Volkswagon GOL 2 Nissan Frontier pickup 1
Honda motorcycles 3

JPA Carchi
Volkswagon GOL 2 Nissan Sentra 2
Ford Ranger Pickup 5
Nissan Frontier pickup 3
Mazda B2600 pickup 1
Toyota Hilux pickup 1
Nissan Urvan van 1
Daihatsu Delta Truck 2
Nissan Frontier pickup 11 Motorcycle CB250 1 Motorcycle XR250 1
Motorcycle XL200 3

UCA Manta
Volkswagon GOL 1 Nissan Frontier pickup 2
Toyota Hilus pickup 1

JPA Imbabura
Volkswagon GOL 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 2
Honda motorcycles XL200 4
Daytona motorcycles GY200 1
Traxx motorcycle GY150 1

DNA
Sedans 44
Pickups 153
SUV 5
trucks 7
Buses 6
Vans 8
Backscatter vans 2
Motorcycles 131

SIU
Sedans 17
Pickups 12
SUV 9
Van 1

JPA Tungurahua
Volkswagon GOL 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 1
Honda motorcycles XL200 3

JPA Loja
Nissan Sentra 1
Volkswagon GOL 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 2
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1
Chevrolet LUV D/Max pickup 1
Honda motorcycles 4

JPA Cotopaxi
Skoda Fabia 1 Nissan Frontier pickup 1
Honda motorcycles XL200 4

JPA Esmeraldas
Ford Ranger pickup 1
Nissan Frontier pickup 1
Chevrolet LUV D/max 1
Honda motorcycles 3

UCAG Puerto Maritimo
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1 Nissan Frontier pickup 3
Mazda B2200 pickup 1
Toyota Hilux pickup 1
Honda motorcycle XL200 4

GEMA Guayaquil
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1 Honda motor cycle XR250 1

UCA Puerto Esmeraldas
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1

SJPA Santo Domingo
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1 Honda motor cycle XL200 1

JPA Cotopaxi
Skoda Fabia 1 Nissan Frontier pickup 1
Honda motorcycles XL200 4

SJP Santo Domingo
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1 Honda motorcycle XL200 1

JPA El Oro
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1 Toyota Hilux pickup 1
Honda motorcycles XL200 3

UCA Machala
Honda motorcycle XL1200 3

UCA San Loenzo
Nissan Frontier pickup 1

JPA Pastaza
Nissan Frontier pickup 1 Honda motorcycle XL200 3

GEMA Tulcan
Mazda pickup 1 Toyota Hilux pickup 1

JPA Esmeraldas
Mazda pickup 1

SLPA Manta
Mazda pickup 1 Honda motorcycle 3

UCA Tulcan
Nissan Frontier pickup 1 Toyota Hilus pickup 1
Honda motorcycle 1

JPA Napo
Nissan /frontier pickup 1 Honda motorcycle 3

UCA Mascarillas
Nissan Frontier pickup 1 Honda motorcycle 1

UCA Santo Domingo
Nissan Frontier pickup 1

JPA Galapagos
Nissan Frontier pickup 1 Honda motorcycle 2

JPA Santo Domingo
Nissan Frontier pickup 1 Honda motorcycle 2

JPA Chimborazo
Nissan Frontier pickup 1 Honda motorcycle 3

SIPA Manabi
Nissan Frontier pickup 1

UCA El Oro
Nissan Frontier pickup 1 Honda motorcycle 3

UCA Cotopaxi
Nissan Frontier pickup 1

JPA Santa Elena
Nissan Frontier pickup 1 Honda motorcycle 2

JPA Los Rios
Nissan /Frontier pickup 1 Honda motorcycle 2

JPA Morona
Chevrolet LUV D/MAX 1 pickup
Honda motorcycle 2
Giace Chevrolet LUV D/Max 1 pickup

JPA Zamora
Honda motorcycle 3

UIES
Chevrolet Corsa 1
Ford Ranger pickup 1

PJ Quito
Nissan Frontier pickup 2
Ford Ranger pickup 1
Ford Exployer SUV 1
Honda motorcycle 1

Aeropolitical Santo Domingo
Nissan Frontier pickup 1
Ford Ranger pickup 2

COAC Quito
Volkswagon GOL 2
Chevrolet LUV pickup 1
Hyundai Hido 2
Honda motorcycle 4

Miscellaneous Equipment
One body scan X-ray machine was donated to the ENP/DNA. It is located at the Guayaquil Airport. One Hazmat ID system was donated to the DEA sponsored Special Investigative Unit. Ten IO scanners were donated to the Ecuadorian Military. Six Identity IRs detectors were donated to the DNA. Forty sets of scuba gear with compressors (2) were donated to the DNA/GEMA. Fifteen CT- 30 Contraband Inspection kits were donated to the DNA. Two chromatographers were donated to the PJ. Nineteen sets of individual equipment (clothing, footwear, eye protection, and police related items and communications accessories) were donated to the COAC. Computer equipment (17 PCs, 4 servers, 17 hard drives, 2 UPS, 6 printers, 1 scanner, 10 CCTV cameras, 4 INFOCUS projectors, 2 security bundles, 2 switches, 2 routers, and miscellaneous software) were donated to the FIU. Living room furniture was donated to the DNA/UCA Quito Airport (2 sofas, one loveseat, and 4 chairs). Fifteen air conditioning systems were donated to the SPA unit in Guayaquil.

Canine Program
Nineteen (19) canines were bought for both the ENP and the USMILGP. They are located in Quito. They were used for drug detection at different units around the country. Eighty-three (83) NAS donated dogs are in the DNA inventory; nineteen (19) of which are newly acquired. Thirty-eight are in Pichincha; 15 in Guayas; one in San Jeronimo; one in Sucumbíos; six in Imbabura; five in Manta; one in Baeza; four in Tulcan; two in San Lorenzo; one in Esmeraldas; 7 in Machala; two in Ydel Jobo.

Vessels
Four Boston Whalers were donated to the Ecuadorian Military through the USMILGP. Five Zodiac boats w/engines (2 each) were donated to the ENP/DNA/GEMA. They are located at Y del Jobo/GEMA and used for post operations along the coastal areas.

Ecuadorian Military
25-foot Boston Whaler
7
Zodiac Boat 470
10
Jet piranhas
15

Weapons
The NAS had previously contributed weapons to the Ecuadorian National Police Anti- Drug Units. There is still a deficiency in weapons and ammunition within the DNA. However, the majority of the police units have a stock of weapons to issue to personnel for use during operations.

ENP/DNA
Pietro Beretta
43
Sig-Sauer
700
Colt AR-15
1

Status- Services

Demand Reduction
The USG has made several attempts to provide training and equipment to the GOE in the fight against TIP. Unfortunately, these attempts have been unsuccessful at this time. The GOE is moving forward with setting up a TIP unit that will answer directly to the Ministry of Government. The unit won't have any funding from the GOE until 2010. This new TIP unit would focus on TIP in general; not only on crime news against women and children. DINAPEN is the current GOE law enforcement agency investigating TIP cases as they relate to children and women. Most, if not all, of the training has been provided by IOM. The GOE is moving forward in training prosecutors in TIP. The GOE has sent their top TIP prosecutor to Vienna for training on the fight against TIP.

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) signed a grant with the National Council for the Control of Drugs (CONSEP) to integrate drug abuse prevention in urban communities in Manta, Loja, Ambato, Esmeraldas, Ibarra and Santa Cruz.

Construction Projects

The facilities donated to the Police are used by the Antinarcotics Police Unit for canine units, mobile units, and Special Forces that control the drug's traffic. The remodeled and constructed buildings are used for offices and barracks for the antinarcotics police personnel to live and to have a safe area.

The donated buildings are in good condition for their normal operations, except for the following police units that need small improvements at maintenance levels: integrated police check point in San Geronimo, police check point in La Y del Jobo, and Carchi antinarcotics police headquarters in Tulcan. To improve the maintenance, post is developing a maintenance contract for the equipment.

Inspections of the following construction projects completed in 2008 were performed:

Troops Barracks, dining room and kitchen for CICC DNI
Maintenance work for Airport canine unit, Mana
Cover of parking area for GEMA group, Baeza
Adaptation of kennels for the canine center at Quito airport Remodeling offices
and troop barracks for canine unit at port Guayaquil
Enlargement of Troop barracks for the canine training center, Quito
Metallic Divisions and Ceiling for the DNA warehouse, Quito
Roof change from kennels area to the canine center, Quito
Construction of fence and cover for kennels at Manta
Remodeling facilities of Pichincha headquarters anti-drug police, Quito
Removing an installation of new doors for JPAP Improvement of Fiscals office for JPAP, Quito
Installation of electrical system for computers at JPAP offices, Quito
Remodeling of office for the Judicial Police Adaptation of barracks and construction of kennels for the anti-narcotics police
Construction of water tank and installation of one 2 HP pump, Baeza
Training rooms for dogs at the canine training center, Quito
New water supply for GEMA group in Baeza
Diesel tank for generator at San Jeronimo police checkpoint
Parking area national police at San Lorenzo
Remodeling of kennels for the Canine Training Center, Quito
Construction of warehouses for CONSEP Guayaquil Enlargement of GEMA police checkpoint in Baeza
Construction of kennels for the Police Canine Unit, San Domingo

Remodeling of officers dormitories at the Canine Training Center, Quito
Construction of kennels for the canine unit at the airport, Guayaquil
Renovation of roof for the DNA headquarters, Quito
Remodeling of office and dormitories and the canine unit, Santo Domingo
Installation of ceramic tiles and ceiling for instruction room in Cema Baeza
Remodeling maintenance workshop for BAL 72, Quito
Remodeling workshop for tactical vehicles for Ecuadorian Navy, Esmeraldas
Adaptation of a maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles for BI 39 BGalo
Molina, Tulcan Adaptation of a maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles of BI 39 Galo Molina,
Tulcan Provision and installation of one 30KVA transformer for the maintenance
workshop for tactical vehicles at GFE-25 Esmeraldas Enlargement of the workshop and construction of parking area for vehicles for
The Ecuadorian van, San Lorenzo
Design and construction of one tactical tower for Ecuadorian army Maldonado,
Carchi Construction of shelters for the ECU army Esmeraldes
Construction of workshop for tactical vehicles
Maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles for Yahuachi
Ibarra Police port inspection facilities in Puerto Bolivar-el Oro
Area police control base in Santo Domingo de los Colorados
Carchi antinarcotics polio headquarters in Tulcan
Police port inspection facilities in Esmeraldas
Construction of barracks and office for Canine Training Center, Quito
Construction of barracks and offices for Canine Airport Unit, Guayaquil
Construction military base, Sucumbios
Construction and remodeling of Villa military base, Sucumbíos

Program Impact

Drug seizures and arrest statistics for the calendar 2008 are (metric tons)

Seizures

Cocaine hydrochloride 21.82
Coca Base/paste .65
Cocaine total 22.47
Heroin .18
Cannabis .74

Drug Laboratories 2.00

Arrests 3,034.00

Communications Equipment
Harris radio products donated to the Ecuadorian Miliary's 4th Division enabled the unit to better communicate with subordinate units throughout the Sucumbíos and Orellana provinces. This enhanced communications allowed the unit to streamline the decision-making process and more rapidly execute missions or changes to missions already taking place. Additionally, the formal and informal classes/instructions provided by Harris instructors were absolutely invaluable to the ECUMIL.

Construction Projects
The projects have improved the standard of living of the anti-narcotics police personnel which has helped to rejuvenate the police's motivation. In addition, the work and office area for the police has improved dramatically, thereby increasing the performance of the police. Increased technology in the facilities has also facilitated a responsive force; these new and renovated facilities also provided the police a stronger and more visible presence.

Construction of the vehicle repair and wash facilities has significantly improved the maintenance capabilities of the unit. The new installations provide a sheltered, all-weather maintenance area that allows the unit to better service their vehicles day or night under adverse weather conditions. The wash facility better enables the unit to maintain the cleanliness of vehicles which thereby enables the unit to easily identify leaks, damaged parts or to other maintenance issues.

Vessels
The Riverine program, run by the Ecuadorian Military along the northern border, has increased the patrolling capacity of the Ecuadorian military along the rivers. This has been accomplished with a growing program that consists of 10 Zodiacs, Boston Whalers and 15 refurbished jet boat piranhas.

Laboratory Equipment
The NAS donated equipment to the Forensic Laboratory for use in analyzing chemicals and drugs in an efficient manner to expedite the resolution of drug cases. The laboratories are equipped with gas chromatographers.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Unmonitored Resources
Although the NAS has a complete inventory of the vehicle fleet, the Mobility Assistant has monitored only a small percentage of them because he began two months ago. However, these items were inspected by verification of hand receipt by each local logistics/supply officer.

Due to the vacancy in the Mobility Assistant position, the NAS Inventory Assistant conducted inventories of the vehicle and motorcycle fleet.

The Mobility Assistant will make one monitoring trip a month in 2009. Post anticipates that 75% of vehicles will be monitored during the calendar year,

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities
The NAS has identified a couple of cases of misuse of vehicles resulting in vehicular accidents. The NAS has sent a number of social memorandums detailing these incidents; a request for a review of police policies regarding this misuse has been sent to the National Director of the Anti-Narcotics Police. The NAS has also held formal meetings with DNA officials, including the National Director, to discuss these accidents. The NAS will continue to closely monitor any future vehicular accidents. The DNA has acknowledged that they are aware of this issue and are working to rectify the situation.

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities
There are some maintenance issues with police units in towns which are located at large distances from larger cities. For this reason, the NAS donated vehicles in these towns often have to travel at least two hours for maintenance or repair of these vehicles. This year, the newly hired NAS Mobility Assistant will personally inspect these vehicles and search for quality maintenance shops at closer locations. If no local shops are identified, the NAS Mobility Assistant will provide basic servicing supplies such as oil and filters.

Department of Defense, 2009

Document: FY2009 Section 1022(a) Report

Program: Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance

NATION: Ecuador PROJECT SUPPORT EFFORT: Upgrades to forward operating sites along Ecuador's northern border with Colombia. Sites are at Chical, Maladonado, and Trufino and support Task Force I operations directed at CN activity on the northern border, as well as eliminating a safe haven for the FARC and other illegal armed groups (IAGs). PROJECT CODE: 9201 FUNDING ($K): $270K DESCRIPTION: Projects provide minor upgrades to Ecuadorian military facilities on the northern border. Upgrades include electrical and plumbing improvements to barracks and operational facilities designed to improve quality of life and operational readiness. PROJECT TASKS: Upgrade utilities at Chical, Maldonado, and Trufino. Repair roof and floors for the operations center at Chical. Install repeater and rework electrical grid at Trufino.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs Policy Initiatives. U.S. counternarcotics assistance is provided to improve the professional capabilities, equipment, and integrity of Ecuador?s police, military, and judicial agencies to enable them to combat more effectively criminal organizations involved in narcotics trafficking and money laundering. A priority has been to support Ecuadorian police and military presence in the northern border region proximate to Colombia, and police presence in other strategically important locations throughout the country. USG supported programs also address increased awareness of the dangers of drug abuse. Bilateral Cooperation. The DNA remains the primary recipient of U.S.-provided counternarcotics assistance, including vehicles, equipment, and training. The DNA which contributed significantly to the continued record level of land-based seizures includes special nation-wide units, such as the Mobile Anti- Narcotics Teams (GEMA) and a drug detection canine program. The U.S. also increased support to DNA?s money laundering unit to combat money laundering organizations operating in Ecuador. In 2009, the U.S. continued to provide support to the military to facilitate their mobility and communications during operations along the Northern Border, and to Ecuadorian Navy elements to better mobilize, equip, and train for narcotics interdiction activities. In 2009 the U.S. Coast Guard, in cooperation with Ecuadorian authorities, removed over 7.8 metric tons of cocaine, seized two vessels, and detained14 smugglers through the use of Maritime Operational Procedures. Ecuador is an active participant in the Multilateral Counterdrug Summit, in which the U.S. participates, along with Panama, Colombia, and Mexico to facilitate regional counternarcotics interoperability. Work on judicial sector reform continued in 2009 although changes to the structure of judicial institutions as required under the new Constitution, which went into effect in October 2008, created some uncertainty regarding the process of criminal cases. A major USG-funded training program continued to train prosecutors, judges, and judicial police throughout the country to more effectively investigate and prosecute criminal cases. In cooperation with the Judicial Council (formerly the National Judicial Council), the U.S. supported nationwide implementation of an automated database of all criminal cases. However, in February implementation was suspended by a political decision of the Judicial Council, as supported by the Ministry of Justice. Once fully implemented this database would enhance management and transparency of the adjudication of criminal cases to address problems of delay and corruption. The U.S. provided technical assistance to support continued implementation of the Financial Intelligence Unit and provided training and equipment to police investigative units. Training assistance programs encompassed anti-money laundering, financial crimes, and maritime law enforcement

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Grant Aid Table Sources:

  • Ecuador Excess Defense Articles 2010; - United States, Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Excess Defense Articles online database (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Foreign Military Financing 2010; - U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Foreign Military Sales, Foreign Military Construction Sales and Other Security Cooperation Historical Facts As of September 30, 2010 (Washington: DSCA, 2011) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador International Military Education and Training 2010; - United States, Department of State, FY 2012 Executive Budget Summary Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: Department of State, February 2011) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2010; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2012 (Washington: Department of State, 2011) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador ; - Clare Ribando Seelke, Liana Sun Wyler, June S. Beittel, Mark P. Sullivan, 'Latin America and the Caribbean: Illicit Drug Trafficking and U.S. Counterdrug Programs' (Washington: U.S. Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, May 12, 2011): 33-4 (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance 2010; - U.S. Department of Defense, Section 1209 and Section 1203(b) Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Years 2008, 2009, and 2010 (Washington: Department of Defense, April 2012) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2010; Ecuador Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2010; Ecuador Service Academies 2010; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011 (Washington: February 2012) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2011; Ecuador Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2011; Ecuador Service Academies 2011; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2012 (Washington: December 2012) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Foreign Military Financing 2011; Ecuador International Military Education and Training 2011; - United States, Department of State, FY 2013 Executive Budget Summary - Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: February 13, 2012) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2011; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2013 (Washington: Department of State, 2012) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2011; Ecuador Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance 2011; - U.S. Department of Defense, Section 1209 and Section 1203(b) Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: Department of Defense, October 2012): (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Foreign Military Financing 2012; Ecuador International Military Education and Training 2012; Ecuador International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2012; - United States, Department of State, FY 2014 Executive Budget Summary - Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: April 10, 2013) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2012; Ecuador Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance 2012; - U.S. Department of Defense, Section 1209 of the NDAA for FY2008 (Public Law 110-181) Report to Congress on Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Year 2012 (Washington: Department of Defense, May 2013): (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Foreign Military Financing 2013; - United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) <(Link to source).
  • Ecuador International Military Education and Training 2013; Ecuador International Military Education and Training 2015; - United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2013; Ecuador Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance 2013; Ecuador Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2014; Ecuador Section 1033 Counter-Drug Assistance 2014; -
  • Ecuador Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2012; Ecuador Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2012; Ecuador Global Peace Operations Initiative 2012; Ecuador Service Academies 2012; Ecuador Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2013; Ecuador Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2013; Ecuador Global Peace Operations Initiative 2013; Ecuador Service Academies 2013; Ecuador Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2014; Ecuador Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2014; Ecuador Global Peace Operations Initiative 2014; Ecuador Service Academies 2014; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013 (Washington: October 2013) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Foreign Military Financing 2014; Ecuador International Military Education and Training 2014; - Based on 2013 actual figures due to 2014 continuing resolution. United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2013; Ecuador International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2014; - Estimate derived using totals from: United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) (Link to source).

Economic Aid Table Sources:

  • Ecuador Defense Department Humanitarian Assistance 2010; - U.S. Department of Defense, Section 1209 and Section 1203b Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Years 2008, 2009, and 2010 Washington: Department of Defense, April 2012 (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Development Assistance 2010; - United States, Department of State, FY 2012 Executive Budget Summary Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: Department of State, February 2011) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2010; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2012 (Washington: Department of State, 2011) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador ; - U.S. Department of Defense, Section 1209 and Section 1203(b) Report to Congress On Foreign-Assistance Related Programs for Fiscal Years 2008, 2009, and 2010 (Washington: Department of Defense, April 2012) (Link to source). (Report says ``Supports the Government of Ecuador's (GOE) efforts to establish a presence in previously ungoverned areas in the Northern Border Region (NBR), while providing security and development opportunities to the local populace.``)
  • Ecuador Development Assistance 2011; - United States, Department of State, FY 2013 Executive Budget Summary - Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: February 13, 2012) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2011; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2013 (Washington: Department of State, 2012) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Development Assistance 2012; Ecuador International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2012; - United States, Department of State, FY 2014 Executive Budget Summary - Function 150 and Other International Programs (Washington: April 10, 2013) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Development Assistance 2013; - United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Development Assistance 2014; - Based on 2013 actual figures due to 2014 continuing resolution. United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2013; Ecuador International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2014; - Estimate derived using totals from: United States, Department of State, FY 2015 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, March 4, 2014) (Link to source).

Trainees Table Sources:

  • Ecuador Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2010; Ecuador Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2010; Ecuador Foreign Military Sales 2010; Ecuador Global Peace Operations Initiative 2010; Ecuador International Military Education and Training 2010; Ecuador Non-Security Assistance - Unified Command 2010; Ecuador Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2010; Ecuador Service Academies 2010; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011 (Washington: February 2012) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2011; Ecuador Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2011; Ecuador Foreign Military Sales 2011; Ecuador International Military Education and Training 2011; Ecuador Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2011; Ecuador Service Academies 2011; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2012 (Washington: December 2012) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2012; Ecuador Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2012; Ecuador Foreign Military Sales 2012; Ecuador Global Peace Operations Initiative 2012; Ecuador International Military Education and Training 2012; Ecuador Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2012; Ecuador Service Academies 2012; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013 (Washington: October 2013) (Link to source).

Sales Table Sources:

  • Ecuador Direct Commercial Sales 2010; - United States, Department of State, Report by the Department of State Pursuant to Sec. 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act (Washington:2011) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Foreign Military Sales 2010; - United States, Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency,Excess Defense Articles authorized and furnished to foreign countries under Part II, Chapter 2, Section 516 of the FAA [22 U.S.C.? 2321(j)](Washington: 2011) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Direct Commercial Sales 2011; - U.S. Department of State, Report by the Department of State Pursuant to Section 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, As Amended (Washington: Department of State, June 2012) (Link to source).
  • Ecuador Foreign Military Sales 2011; - Department of Defense, DSCA Security Assistance Sales: Detailed Deliveries for Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: DSCA, 2012) (Link to source).

Deployments Table Sources:

  • Ecuador ; -