U.S. Aid to Colombia, All Programs, 2006-2011

Grant military and police aid to Colombia, All Programs, 2006-2011

Aid Program 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Program Total
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 350,248,000 386,869,000 223,124,500 228,239,000 199,950,000 168,413,708 1,556,844,208
Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 132,980,000 112,046,000 112,046,000 112,046,000 112,046,000 112,046,000 693,210,000
Foreign Military Financing 89,100,000 85,500,000 52,570,000 53,000,000 55,000,000 51,500,000 386,670,000
Department of Defense Military Construction 46,000,000 46,000,000
NADR – Anti-Terrorism Assistance 5,176,000 3,395,000 3,288,000 2,750,000 4,395,000 4,395,000 23,399,000
Excess Defense Articles 137,000 9,569,000 110,849 9,816,849
Non-Security Assistance – Unified Command 1,609,148 1,609,148 1,609,148 1,609,148 1,609,148 1,609,148 9,654,888
International Military Education and Training 1,673,000 1,646,000 1,421,000 1,400,000 1,695,000 1,695,000 9,530,000
NADR – Humanitarian Demining 300,000 691,000 400,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 5,391,000
NADR – Conventional Weapons Destruction 691,000 427,000 400,000 1,518,000
Service Academies 227,725 227,725 227,725 227,725 227,725 227,725 1,366,350
Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 222,659 222,659 222,659 222,659 222,659 222,659 1,335,954
Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 96,750 96,750 96,750 96,750 96,750 96,750 580,500
Aviation Leadership Program 59,383 59,383 59,383 59,383 59,383 59,383 356,298
NADR – Counter-Terrorism Financing 100,000 100,000 200,000
Asia-Pacific Center 2,388 2,388 2,388 2,388 2,388 2,388 14,328
TOTAL 581,832,053 602,625,053 395,205,402 400,453,053 423,404,053 342,367,761 2,745,887,375

All amounts in U.S. dollars. Numbers in italics are estimates, usually based on the closest year for which data are available.

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Grant economic and social aid to Colombia, All Programs, 2006-2011All Grant Aid to Colombia, All Programs, 2006-2011Military and Police Trainees from Colombia, All Programs, 2006-2011U.S. Institutions that Trained Personnel from Colombia, All Programs, 2006-2011 (Max. 20 Shown)Arms and Equipment Sold to Colombia, All Programs, 2006-2011Deployments and Operations in Colombia, All Programs, 2006-2011

Official Descriptions of Aid to Colombia

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Program: International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs Policy Initiatives. U.S. counternarcotics and rule of law programs in Colombia focus on disrupting the illicit drug trade, strengthening institutions and transferring additional operational and financial responsibilities to the GOC in a sustained manner. We will continue to support Colombian efforts to consolidate security and social assistance in several key priority areas, further develop the capabilities of rural police, promote the demobilization of former combatants and concentrate eradication resources in those areas where coca growth is the heaviest. Bilateral Cooperation. Colombia is a valued partner in the fight against illegal drugs. After the successes of Plan Colombia, the U.S. is maintaining a reduced but strong counternarcotics assistance program to solidify these gains. The adoption of new tactics by narcotics traffickers, including shifting coca cultivation and cocaine production to new, remote areas, and expanding cultivation into areas off-limits to the spray program, has enabled them to continue to produce and export cocaine in large quantities. In response, Colombia adjusted its approach to focus on establishing a sustainable government presence and integrated rural development in major coca growing and FARC-controlled regions. As Colombia increases its capacity to take and hold its territory from criminal groups, drug traffickers and terrorists, the U.S. will continue to support the GOC with airlift capacity to ensure support for interdiction and eradication as well as provide training and equipment for specialized and rural police units. Continued U.S. support for Colombia?s justice sector will be important to mitigating the drug trade, as well as improving the investigation and prosecution of human rights cases. Although illicit crop eradication programs were reduced in 2009 because of U.S. and GOC funding constraints, strong aerial and manual eradication programs remained important to achieving U.S. counternarcotics goals. Aerial and manual eradication operations were closely coordinated to complement each other and optimize capabilities. Aerial eradication helped eliminate coca in remote regions and in FARC-controlled areas that were too dangerous for manual eradication, prevents the FARC and other drug trafficking organizations from receiving revenue for coca cultivation, helps improve security in remote regions because of the presence of GOC forces and keeps drugs from flooding transit zone countries like Mexico. Eradication programs that were closely linked to alternative development remain a necessary component of a larger counternarcotics effort in Colombia. In an attempt to better coordinate the multiple aspects of reestablishing security in former conflict regions, support interdiction and eradication programs and provide socio-economic development, the U.S. supported the GOC?s National Consolidation Plan. To that end, U.S. security, counternarcotics and alternative development assistance was better sequenced in several strategic zones to ensure sustained eradication, permanent government presence and alternative livelihoods for those engaged in drug cultivation. In light of growing GOC institutional capacity, the U.S. transferred operational and financial responsibility, i.e., ?nationalization,? for several counternarcotics programs to GOC control. Significant progress in nationalizing aviation programs occurred, and additional support will be turned over to local control in a sustainable fashion over the next several years. Achievements in the nationalization program in 2009 included the title transfer of 17 UH-1N helicopters in the Colombian Army Aviation program, the assumption by the Colombian National Police for both helicopter support packages that are part of the aerial eradication program and the transfer of Air Bridge Denial program to GOC control. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) training activities in 2009 included a three-week International Task Force Agent Training (ITAT) course for 14 CNP DIJIN investigators at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Georgia, with a concentration on money laundering investigations. ICE supported GOC asset forfeiture efforts to attack transnational criminal organizations and the DIJIN money laundering investigative group that performed financial analysis on targets of interest for multiple U.S. federal law enforcement agencies. In September 2009, ICE Bogota coordinated an investigation into a multi-national criminal organization dedicated of smuggling bulk cash. This joint effort ultimately resulted in the seizure of $41 million at the seaport of Buenaventura, Colombia. Additionally, ICE Bogota coordinated efforts with ICE Mexico resulting in additional seizures totaling $11 million at the seaport of Manzanillo, Mexico. ICE?s Border Enforcement Security Taskforce (BEST) teams are multi-agency teams developed as a comprehensive approach to increasing information sharing among participating agencies in identifying, disrupting and dismantling criminal organizations posing significant threats to U.S. border security. BEST teams incorporate personnel from ICE, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Attorney?s Office along with other key federal, state, local and foreign law enforcement agencies, to include Mexico, Canada, Colombia, and Argentina. ICE will post three Colombian National Police Officers in BEST units in San Diego, New York, and Miami for periods of two years. Cooperation between Colombia and the U.S. Coast Guard remains strong. The bilateral counternarcotics agreement with Colombia is utilized on a regular basis to conduct drug interdictions in the transit zone. Colombia is an active participant in the Multilateral Counterdrug Summit, which includes the participation of Panama, Mexico and Ecuador to work towards regional counternarcotics interoperability. In 2009, the bilateral agreement directly facilitated the interdiction of 7 Colombian flagged vessels. Additionally, the U.S. Coast Guard facilitated attendance for members of the Colombian Navy at the International Maritime Officer?s Course and the Chief Petty Officer Academy. Alternative Development. By September of 2009, U.S. and GOC alternative development programs had supported the cultivation of over 659,926 hectares of agricultural, forestry plantation and/or natural forest management activities and had completed approximately 1,290 social and productive infrastructure projects over the last seven years with communities that agree to remain illicit crop free. More than 439,276 families in 18 departments have benefited from these programs. Additionally, these projects have leveraged over $759 million in private and public sector funding for alternative development initiatives. Beginning in 2010, U.S. Agency for International Development-assisted alternative development programming will be aligned in large part with the GOC?s National Consolidation Plan. Support for Democracy and Judicial Reform. The U.S. is providing extensive assistance to reform and strengthen the criminal justice system and the rule of law in Colombia. The U.S. provided training and technical assistance to support the new roles of judges, prosecutors, forensic scientists, public defenders, and police investigators under the new accusatory system. This assistance focused on practical training, including crime scene management, investigation and prosecution strategy, interviewing witnesses, and courtroom proceedings. The program provided training to more than 60,000 prosecutors, judges, public defenders, criminal investigators, and forensic experts. Specialized training and assistance has also been provided to prosecutor and investigator units focusing on criminal cases in the areas of human rights, murder, sex crimes, money laundering, narcotics, corruption, intellectual property, and organized crime. Extensive forensic assistance in the areas of DNA, ballistics, false documents, courtroom testimony, and equipment and enhancement of forensic laboratories has been shared. Particular emphasis has been on the development of exhumation teams to properly exhume mass grave sites connected to investigations and confessions of paramilitary and guerilla groups, as well as to enhance DNA identification of victim remains. Assistance has also been provided for witness protection and court security. In order to increase access to justice for millions of Colombians, the U.S. assisted in refurbishing or building 45 physical court rooms in urban areas, 14 virtual court rooms in rural zones, and either refurbished or equipped 22 public defender offices. The GOC constructed with U.S. support 59 justice houses throughout Colombia that provided formal and informal justice sector services to over eight million Colombians. Military Justice. The GOC trained 48 judges and prosecutors in their Military Penal Justice Corps in 2009. This included a one-year course for eight Magistrates and ten certification exams for Military Tribunal Court Justices. The goal of this effort was to build capability for Magistrates and Prosecutors to convene military courts and adjudicate legal violations. The Rules of Engagement and Rules for the Use of Force (ROE/RUF) Initiative was a crucial part of U.S./GOC engagement. In addition, the U.S. is supporting a Colombian Military training program, which by the end of 2010, all Colombian ground troops and commanders will have received new training and support materials, reducing risk of human rights violations associated with military operations. The Colombian Military?s investigative capabilities are carried out by the Inspector General. U.S. assistance provided for the training of 90 Inspectors General (IGs) throughout the country. All U.S. engagement incorporates principles of respect for human rights and international humanitarian law.

U.S. Department of State, 2010U.S. Department of State, 2010U.S. Department of State, 2010U.S. Department of State, 2010U.S. Department of State, 2010U.S. Southern Command, 2009U.S Department of State, 2007U.S Department of State, 2007U.S. Southern Command, 2009

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Grant Aid Table Sources:

  • Colombia Asia-Pacific Center 2006; – United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007: A Report to Congress (Washington: August 2007)(Link to source).
  • Colombia Excess Defense Articles 2006; Colombia International Military Education and Training 2006; Colombia NADR – Anti-Terrorism Assistance 2006; Colombia NADR – Humanitarian Demining 2006; – United States, Department of State, FY 2008 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, February 2007) (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2006; – United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, FY 2008 Program and Budget Guide (Washington: U.S. Department of State, September 2007) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2006; – United States, Department of Defense, Office of Freedom of Information, Freedom of Information Act Request by Marina Walker Guevara, Ref: 06-F-0839 (Washington: September 26, 2006) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Aviation Leadership Program 2006; Colombia Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2006; Colombia Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2006; Colombia Non-Security Assistance – Unified Command 2006; Colombia Service Academies 2006; – United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007: A Report to Congress (Washington: August 2007) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Excess Defense Articles 2007; – United States, Department of State, FY 2009 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, February 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Foreign Military Financing 2006; Colombia Foreign Military Financing 2007; Colombia Foreign Military Financing 2008; – United States, Department of State, Report on the Uses of Foreign Military Financing, International Military Education and Training, and Peacekeeping Operations Funds (Washington: Department of State: October 27, 2009) (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Military Education and Training 2007; Colombia International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2007; – United States, Department of State, FY 2009 International Affairs (Function 150) Budget Request–Summary and Highlights (Washington: Department of State: February 4, 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2007; – (1) U.S. Department of Defense, Response to Freedom of Information Act Request submitted by the Fellowship of Reconciliation (Washington: Department of Defense, April 2008). (2) United States, Department of Defense, Section 1209 Report to Congress on Foreign-Assistance Related Programs Carried out by the Department of Defense (Washington: August 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Asia-Pacific Center 2007; Colombia Aviation Leadership Program 2007; Colombia Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2007; Colombia Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2007; Colombia Non-Security Assistance – Unified Command 2007; Colombia Service Academies 2007; Colombia Asia-Pacific Center 2008; Colombia Aviation Leadership Program 2008; Colombia Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2008; Colombia Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2008; Colombia Non-Security Assistance – Unified Command 2008; Colombia Service Academies 2008; Colombia Asia-Pacific Center 2009; Colombia Aviation Leadership Program 2009; Colombia Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2009; Colombia Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2009; Colombia Non-Security Assistance – Unified Command 2009; Colombia Service Academies 2009; Colombia Asia-Pacific Center 2010; Colombia Aviation Leadership Program 2010; Colombia Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2010; Colombia Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2010; Colombia Non-Security Assistance – Unified Command 2010; Colombia Service Academies 2010; – Estimate based on closest available year.
  • Colombia Excess Defense Articles 2008; – United States, Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency, FY 2008 Excess Defense Article authorized and furnished to foreign countries under Part II, Chapter 2, Section 516 of the FAA (Washington 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2008; – United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2010 (Washington: Department of State). (Colombia NADR – Anti-Terrorism Assistance 2007; Colombia NADR – Conventional Weapons Destruction 2007; Colombia NADR – Humanitarian Demining 2007; Colombia NADR – Conventional Weapons Destruction 2008; Colombia NADR – Conventional Weapons Destruction 2009; – United States, Department of State, Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, February 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2009; – United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2010 (Washington: Department of State) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2008; Colombia Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2009; Colombia Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2010; – Estimate based on last available year.
  • Colombia Department of Defense Military Construction 2010; – National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (H.R.2647), as approved by Congress (Washington: October 28, 2009) (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2010; – U.S. Congress, Conference Report 111-366 for H.R. 3288, Omnibus Appropriations Bill for Fiscal Year 2010, December 8, 2009 [See pages 1500 and 1501 of the PDF file] (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Military Education and Training 2008; Colombia NADR – Anti-Terrorism Assistance 2008; Colombia NADR – Anti-Terrorism Assistance 2009; Colombia NADR – Humanitarian Demining 2009; Colombia NADR – Anti-Terrorism Assistance 2010; Colombia NADR – Counter-Terrorism Financing 2010; Colombia NADR – Humanitarian Demining 2010; – United States, Department of State, FY 2010 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, May 2009) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Foreign Military Financing 2009; Colombia International Military Education and Training 2009; Colombia Foreign Military Financing 2010; Colombia International Military Education and Training 2010; Colombia Foreign Military Financing 2011; Colombia International Military Education and Training 2011; – United States, Department of State, Executive Budget Summary: Function 150 and Other International Programs, Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: Department of State, February 1, 2010) (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2011; – United States, Department of State, Executive Budget Summary: Function 150 and Other International Programs, Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: Department of State, February 1, 2010) (Link to source). Military aid estimate prorated by consulting INCLE economic to military aid ratio presented in United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2010 (Washington: Department of State) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Asia-Pacific Center 2011; Colombia Aviation Leadership Program 2011; Colombia Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2011; Colombia Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2011; Colombia NADR – Anti-Terrorism Assistance 2011; Colombia NADR – Counter-Terrorism Financing 2011; Colombia NADR – Humanitarian Demining 2011; Colombia Non-Security Assistance – Unified Command 2011; Colombia Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2011; Colombia Service Academies 2011; 

Economic Aid Table Sources:

  • Colombia International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2006; – United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, FY 2008 Program and Budget Guide (Washington: U.S. Department of State, September 2007) (Link to source).
  • Colombia PL 480 `Food for Peace` 2006; – United States, Department of State, FY 2008 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, February 2007) (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2007; – United States, Department of State, FY 2009 International Affairs (Function 150) Budget Request–Summary and Highlights (Washington: Department of State: February 4, 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia PL 480 `Food for Peace` 2007; Colombia Transition Initiatives 2007; Colombia Transition Initiatives 2008; – United States, Department of State, Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, February 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Section 1207 Security and Stabilization Assistance 2007; – (1) United States, Department of Defense, Section 1209 Report to Congress on Foreign-Assistance Related Programs Carried out by the Department of Defense (Washington: August 2008) (Link to source). (2) Nina M. Serafino, Congressional Research Service, Department of Defense �Section 1207� Security and Stabilization Assistance: A Fact Sheet (Washington: CRS, November 25, 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Economic Support Fund 2008; Colombia PL 480 `Food for Peace` 2008; – United States, Department of State, FY 2010 Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations (Washington: Department of State, May 2009) (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2008; – United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2010 (Washington: Department of State). (Colombia Section 1207 Security and Stabilization Assistance 2008; – Nina M. Serafino, Congressional Research Service, Department of Defense �Section 1207� Security and Stabilization Assistance: A Fact Sheet (Washington: CRS, November 25, 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2009; – United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2010 (Washington: Department of State) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Section 1207 Security and Stabilization Assistance 2009; Colombia Transition Initiatives 2009; 
  • Colombia International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2010; – U.S. Congress, Conference Report 111-366 for H.R. 3288, Omnibus Appropriations Bill for Fiscal Year 2010, December 8, 2009 [See pages 1500 and 1501 of the PDF file] (Link to source).
  • Colombia Economic Support Fund 2009; Colombia Economic Support Fund 2010; Colombia Migration and Refugee Assistance 2010; Colombia Economic Support Fund 2011; – United States, Department of State, Executive Budget Summary: Function 150 and Other International Programs, Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: Department of State, February 1, 2010) (Link to source).
  • Colombia International Narcotics Control Economic Aid 2011; – United States, Department of State, Executive Budget Summary: Function 150 and Other International Programs, Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: Department of State, February 1, 2010) (Link to source). Military aid estimate prorated by consulting INCLE economic to military aid ratio presented in U.S. Congress, Conference Report 111-366 for H.R. 3288, Omnibus Appropriations Bill for Fiscal Year 2010, December 8, 2009 [See pages 1500 and 1501 of the PDF file] (Link to source).

Trainees Table Sources:

  • Colombia Aviation Leadership Program 2006; Colombia Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2006; Colombia Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2006; Colombia Foreign Military Financing 2006; Colombia Foreign Military Sales 2006; Colombia International Military Education and Training 2006; Colombia International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2006; Colombia Non-Security Assistance – Unified Command 2006; Colombia Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2006; Colombia Service Academies 2006; – United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007: A Report to Congress (Washington: August 2007) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Aviation Leadership Program 2007; Colombia Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2007; Colombia Counter-Terrorism Fellowship Program 2007; Colombia Foreign Military Financing 2007; Colombia Foreign Military Sales 2007; Colombia International Military Education and Training 2007; Colombia International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 2007; Colombia Non-Security Assistance – Unified Command 2007; Colombia Section 1004 Counter-Drug Assistance 2007; Colombia Service Academies 2007; – United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2007 and 2008 (Washington: January 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Asia-Pacific Center 2008; Colombia Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies 2008; Colombia George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies 2008; – United States, Department of Defense, Regional Centers for Security Studies Fiscal Year 2008 Report (Washington: Department of Defense, February 2009) (Link to source).

Sales Table Sources:

  • Colombia Direct Commercial Sales 2006; – United States, Department of State, Report by the Department of State Pursuant to Sec. 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act (Washington: 2007) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Foreign Military Sales 2006; – United States, Department of Defense, Response to Freedom of Information Act request from Federation of American Scientists (Washington: Department of Defense, January 30, 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Direct Commercial Sales 2007; – United States, Department of State, Report by the Department of State Pursuant to Sec. 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act (Washington: May 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Foreign Military Sales 2007; – United States, Department of Defense, Response to Freedom of Information Act request from Federation of American Scientists (Washington: Department of Defense, January 30, 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Direct Commercial Sales 2008; – United States, Department of State, Report by the Department of State Pursuant to Sec. 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act (Washington: 2009) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Foreign Military Sales 2008; – United States, Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Defense Articles and Services authorized and furnished to foreign countries and international organizations under Foreign Military Sales, Chapter 2, Arms Export Control Act (Washington: January 15, 2009) (Link to source).

Deployments Table Sources:

  • Colombia Humanitarian and Civic Assistance 2006; – United States, Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Humanitarian and Civic Assistance and Humanitarian Mine Action Programs of the Department of Defense, Fiscal Year 2006, (Washington: Department of Defense, February 2007).
  • Colombia Section 124 Counter-Drug Operations 2006; – United States, Department of Defense, Office of Freedom of Information, Freedom of Information Act Request by Marina Walker Guevara, Ref: 06-F-0839 (Washington: September 26, 2006) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Humanitarian and Civic Assistance 2007; – United States, Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Humanitarian and Civic Assistance and Humanitarian Mine Action Programs of the Department of Defense, Fiscal Year 2007, (Washington: Department of Defense, February 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Humanitarian and Civic Assistance 2007; Colombia Section 124 Counter-Drug Operations 2007; – United States, Department of Defense, Section 1209 Report to Congress on Foreign-Assistance Related Programs Carried out by the Department of Defense (Washington: August 2008) (Link to source).
  • Colombia Humanitarian and Civic Assistance 2008; – United States, Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Humanitarian and Civic Assistance and Humanitarian Mine Action Programs of the Department of Defense, Fiscal Year 2008, (Washington: Department of Defense, March 1, 2009) (Link to source).